Puppet momentum, ~$100m annual sales

Growth, in terms of customers and revenue, appears to be significant. About 34,000 companies use Puppet’s software to automate data center operations, with 6,000 added last year, Kanies said. The company is approaching $100 million in annual sales and is expanding its headquarters in Portland, Ore. In January, it secured $22 million in financing from Silicon Valley Bank to fuel further expansion.

And then a stray container momentum/penetration number from Forrester:

Stroud sees promise in Puppet’s container support, despite his observation that only about 8% of companies are using containers for production workloads. “It gives current Puppetized work the ability to be containerized,” he said.

From The Register’s PuppetConf report

DellEMCWorld 2016

I skipped a few years, but I’ve been to most of the DellWorlds. It’s fun to be back this year now that Dell has fully scooped up EMC and, thus, Pivotal. I’m giving a talk on Wednesday, Oct. 18th, at 2:15pm along with my pal Richard Seroter, slides above.

There’s a few other recordings and shenanigans going on as well. Hopefully we’ll get some Pivotal Conversations episodes going, if not a new Coté Show episode too.

Cloud Platform Adoption: Lessons Learned — Philip Glebow, Gap

Gap’s Philip Glebow goes over their use of Pivotal Cloud Foundry, including things that worked well and need improvement. His list of the supporting tools they use – like APM and data virtualization – is handy as well.

Some items:

  • (~2:30) Fast deploys: “We can deploy changes faster than people can really consume them.”
  • (~18:00) Developer morale: “We could really push something in five minutes… and developers love it, you click the commit button and there you go.”
  • (~19:40) [Poor transcription by me] On the danger of changing too fast: …generally we want to have a little bit of control into what goes into that production environment… but we don’t want to change so rapidly so that users are confused… There’s also a little bit of cultural change that we need to go through… ((too rapid of change is jarring)) …and as we bring that capability forward, we want to be sensitive to those concerns.
  • (~23:58) Overview of their pipeline and testing.
    (~26:29) [Poor transcription by me]  Typically we’ve organized out teams around sort of domain concepts – so we have a pricing team – then there’s several squads, then that squad is responsible for optimization – price, packing the stuff, etc. That’s how we’ve organized the teams, two pizza teams, we’ve tried to that. Also, distributed teams… sometimes that’s a little bit complicated.

Allianz now deploying to production in minutes

By changing its development practices and investing in a private cloud platform as a service, there have been clear benefits to the business. “Historically it would take two or three days for a deployment to go to production, with lots of manual production. Now with the apps in the garages we can do it on the basis of Cloud Foundry within minutes.”

Source: Allianz app deployment goes from ‘days to minutes’ with PaaS and agile practices

The Apple Watch in Restaurant Dining Rooms

Using Apple Watches to assist waitstaff is interesting, but sort of over kill.

I’d assume they’d still need to take orders which probably works best with paper (or just memorizing), or at best a tablet or phablet. The watch is not very good for reading and gathering information: it’s better at taking quick actions, just getting quick info like the time or current temperature, and small notifications.

Still, any new use case people come up with is interesting:

Second, the use of the Apple Watch adds an interesting layer to day-to-day hospitality practices. Guest notes within reservations are nothing new, but employing a dynamic, real-time system to make sure that the people who need to read the notes actually do read the notes is a major step. The Apple Watch, for its… shortcomings, is arguably less intrusive than a mobile phone or larger screen, and can be checked far more discreetly. I can’t speak for restaurant floor managers, but from this side of the keyboard, this seems like an efficient technological upgrade.

Another interesting tidbit buried in the Eater piece: soon, ResyOS will support the ability to add other diners to a reservation so the restaurant has a clearer picture of everyone at the table — great news for couples who keep track of which reservation profiles have all of the “good notes.” (We all do that, right?)

Source:  The Apple Watch in Restaurant Dining Rooms 

Living life one quarter at a time, maybe it’s fine

Tyler Cowen suggests that we shouldn’t be freaked out by the emphasis on quarterly returns. Many public companies companies blame making quarterly numbers as a reason for short term planning, versus long term (one assumes) innovative strategies. The pieces suggests that that short sightedness may have a reason:

In information technology, the average life of a corporate asset is about six years, in health care it is about 11 years, and for consumer products it runs about 12 to 15. Very often it is hard for a company to plan its operations beyond those time periods, as the U.S. economy is no longer based on durable manufacturing machines. Production has shifted toward service sectors with relatively short asset lives, and that may call for a shorter-term orientation in response.

And, throw in all the “change or die”, digital transformation stuff and who knows what tomorrow will look like? As a counter, re-jiggering a company to be “digital” can take time. But, as Coleen suggests, investors don’t always seems to punish that (I’d add, if they have faith in management and the culture of the company):

Equity markets do not seem to neglect the longer run. Amazon has a high share price even though its earnings reports have usually failed to show a profit. Possibly the market judgment is wrong, but it’s hardly the case that investors are ignoring the long-run prospects of the company.

Further more, if I doesn’t work out:

If public shareholders are placing too much short-term pressure on their companies for a good quarterly earnings report, companies have the option of boosting their value by going private, as has been the trend. By 2012, the number of U.S. public corporations was less than half what it had been in 1997, in part because many companies went private. This is possible evidence that there have been problems with corporate short-termism, but on the other hand it shows that a market response is possible. Good governance is a scarce resource, and it may be that markets concentrate it in the places that need it most.

Source: Is corporate thinking too short-term?

IT/Business alignment: why it’s different this time

Re-reading Nick’s piece on “digital transformation,” I like how he explains what’s new and different from past waves of IT innovation (lik ERP and econmerce), e.g.:

“Going digital results in an explosion in the amount of data you have. New channels of engagement between customers and organizations have resulted in new sources of information coming into the organization at speeds not seen before. In the past, customer interaction was mostly one-way – from the organization to the customer. Now it is about customer-directed, on-demand two-way engagement anywhere on any device. Customers want to communicate on their terms in their preferred channels. That causes organizations to have to transform the way they handle such information, since having a large call center may not be enough – or even that relevant in the future, given that so much communication will come via social media, in messages or increasingly via video. Add to that the explosion in information from Internet of Things (IoT) devices, and it’s pretty clear that the days of management by gut-feel and hunch are over, and data-driven decision-making is the only way to go.

And also, some numbers:

  • “Less than 25% of organizations that participated in a recent 451 Research survey (451 Research VoCUL, April 2016) said they had a well-defined formal digital transformation strategy. So we’re in the early stages of digital transformation, and there’s lots of work to be done.”
  • “Erik Brynjolfsson, Lorin Hitt and Heekyung Hellen Kim from MIT and University of Pennsylvania found that companies with data-driven decision environments have 5% higher productivity, 6% higher profit and up to 50% higher market value than other businesses.”
  • “Our research shows about 65% of IT decision-makers using agile methods and about 40% adopting DevOps today (VotE Software-Defined Infrastructure Q4 2015).”

Source: Digital transformation: the what, the why and the how

1,000+ companies using Facebook’s intranet service, Workplace

There is a News Feed that displays articles, updates or comments relevant to certain teams or, perhaps, to the entire company. The now-familiar Live service can be used to broadcast corporate communications, such as a presentation by the CEO. Workers can communicate in real time using a version of Messenger. They can also create private Groups for brainstorms or discussions—as of this week, groups can include colleagues or business partners that aren’t official employees. That feature wasn’t previously available until today’s launch.

It looks like $1-3 a month (I’m guessing). I mean: I’ve never used an intranet site that was worth a damn. You could do worse than using Facebook for it: it seems to do a damn fine job as the intranet for people’s lives.

What’s always mattered in these things is that the vendor (here, Facebook) keeps up with it over the course of 5-10 years. Otherwise, it become a big hunk of crap you can’t escape that never evolves. Google Apps (or whatever it’s called) is like this: aside from GMail, it never seems to evovle at a pace that makese sense, so you’re left with the ideas of 2-3 years ago. So, the question becomes: is Facebook in this for the long-haul?

Source: Facebook at Work: Workplace by Facebook Is Now on the Clock