073: “My pants are full of brisket,” Apple updates, & Oracle storms the AWS castle – Software Defined Talk

Apple has put out three new things – the phone, the watch, and the OS – which we discuss. And then Oracle announced it’s destroying Amazon, which is fun. We start it all off with a word-salad of the usual nonsense and deodorant talk.

Listen above, subscribe to the feed (or iTunes), or download the MP3 directly.

With Brandon Whichard, Matt Ray, and Coté.

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Show notes

WordPress Talk

macOS Sierra

Oracle is gonna cream AWS. Wait, wut?

BONUS LINKS! Not covered in show.

This week in tech PE

Microservices – Please don’t

  • Maybe microservices ain’t all they’re cracked up to be
  • 5 “truths” (spoiler, maybe not)
    1. It keeps the code cleaner
    2. It’s easy to write things that only have one purpose
    3. They’re faster than monoliths
    4. It’s easy for engineers to not all work in the same codebase
    5. It’s the simplest way to handle autoscaling, plus Docker is in here somewhere
  • This piece by my man Kenny is ball-exploding awesome.

Too Old to Code?

  • Tim Bray is old and codes.
  • “That’s fine for you, Marge, but I used to rock and roll all night and party every day. … Now I’m lucky if I can find half an hour a week in which to get funky.”. – Homer Simpson

Recommendations

Linux killed Sun?

For the Sun: WTF? files:

Gerstner questioned whether three or four years from now any proprietary version of Unix, such as Sun’s Solaris, will have a leading market position.

One of the more popular theories for the decline of Sun is that they accepted Linux way, way too late. As a counter-example, there’s IBM saying that somewhere around 2006 you’d see the steep decline of the Unix market, including Solaris, of course.

If I ever get around to writing that book on Sun, a chart showing server OS market-share from 2000 to 2016 would pair well with that quote.

If you’ve read Stephen’s fine book, The New Kingmakers, you may recall this relevant passage:

In 2001, IBM publicly committed to spending $1 billion on Linux. To put this in context, that figure represented 1.2% of the company’s revenue that year and a fifth of its entire 2001 R&D spend. Between porting its own applications to Linux and porting Linux to its hardware platforms, IBM, one of the largest commercial technology vendors on the planet, was pouring a billion dollars into the ecosystem around an operating system originally written by a Finnish graduate student that no single entity — not even IBM — could ever own. By the time IBM invested in the technology, Linux was already the product of years of contributions from individual developers and businesses all over the world.

How did this investment pan out? A year later, Bill Zeitler, head of IBM’s server group, claimed that they’d made almost all of that money back. “We’ve recouped most of it in the first year in sales of software and systems. We think it was money well spent. Almost all of it, we got back.”

Source: IBM to spend $1 billion on Linux in 2001 – CNET

The HPE hedging gambit

Some crisp HPE strategy coverage from Chris Evans at El Reg:

HPE is remaining part of the CSC and Micro Focus businesses by having a shareholding in the new organisations. It’s fascinating to think what this might mean going forward. It’s like neither business wants to fully commit to where future revenue for their business may lie. I say this because I can only assume that infrastructure sales will become a dwindling business as companies move to public cloud; it doesn’t seem to be enough that infrastructure alone will keep businesses buying on-site solutions.

And, a nice summing up of the HP master plan:

Effectively Meg Whitman is unravelling some of the bad decisions of the last few years, including the purchase of Autonomy and acquisition of EDS in 2008. There’s more focus on delivering infrastructure to clients, rather than moving revenue to services – remember HPE’s public cloud offering was also culled at the beginning of 2016.

The Register

Oracle launches a new IaaS, checks out

Lydia has a great overview of the newest Oracle run at IaaS:

The next-gen cloud currently consists of an SDN (capable of both Layer 2 and Layer 3 networking, which is a differentiator), block storage, object storage, and bare-metal servers (thus the initial moniker, “Oracle Bare Metal Cloud”). Virtual machines (VMs) are coming later this year, with containers to follow early next year. Based on a detailed engineering briefing that Oracle provided to myself and my colleagues, I would say that smart and scalable choices seem to have been made throughout. However, I would characterize this early offering as minimum viable product; it is the foundation of a future competitive offering, rather than a competitive offering today.

She goes on the characterize it as bare-metal and point out that composting of price is not how this market works: you compete on capability. That seems to march Oracle’s core belief system.

Source: Oracle’s next-gen cloud IaaS offering