Software Defined Talk: Cloud is just “jigglin’ wires”

This week’s episode is up! Listen below:

Calling in hot from New Braunfels Texas, we got a country mile’s worth of topics this week: we have container services from Microsoft, a lengthy discussion of how enterprise software companies organize their global sales regions, the possible emergence of a new private cloud meme, and rumors that BMC is no longer in acquiring CA.

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Pivotal Conversations: A hopeful view of cloud-native enterprise architecture

Another discussion about what enterprise architecture might mean in a cloud-native world:

It’s probably a good idea to learn about enterprise architecture by talking to someone who’s actually done it. In this episode, we talk with Stuart Charlton, now of Pivotal, but previously of roles where he EA’s, even back in the SOA era! We discuss the mapping of traditional EA to cloud-native, and also some strategies for Coté to increase his Twitter followers, and, as ever, some recent cloud-native news.

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TechCrunch whiffs out the possibility that private cloud is a thing

“We’re seeing a big trend among customers to move cloud stacks inside customer’s data center for security, performance and governance,” Wang told TechCrunch.

There’s not really any qualitative (market share, penetration, or surveys – all pretty easy to lmgtfy) bits here, but I’d take it more as a slightly eyebrow raising thing along the lines of “if even TechCrunch wiffs out private cloud, maybe there’s some fire there.”

Plus, analyst quotes.

Link

Coté Show: North-bound Enterprise Architecture with Matt Walburn – that business/IT alignment dance

Further on the quest to figure out what a “cloud-native enterprise architect” is:

What’s the “business” side of enterprise architecture? And how does EA’ing start mapping to DevOps, cloud-native, and all the new stuff? In part one of this discussion, I talk with Matt Walburn about how EA’s fit into The Business.

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Software Defined Talk: is The Hot Dog incremental innovation, or disruptive innovation?

This week:

Sniffing out a huge market in hot dog apps, Amazon might start a messaging app. Also, Google has their ant-data gravity device out and Basho seems to be shutting down. We discuss the wonders of Snap’s hot dog app, the mystery of Amazon’s lack(?) of brand allegiance, and giving up on kale.

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US Air Force & Pivotal digitizing flight-ops together – $2.7m contract

The $2.7 million contract involved in the program is between the Air Force and a Silicon Valley company, Pivotal Inc., that has often worked with large corporations such as Ford and Home Depot. The effort is expected to reach beyond the operations center in Qatar to eventually assist in similar U.S. military facilities across the world.

It was a project to digitize refueling aircraft, from the previously analog approach:

The visitors, part of then-Defense Secretary Ash Carter’s new Defense Innovation Board, were surprised to see that the Air Force used a white marker board to plan the elaborate daily effort to refuel aircraft involved in the war in Iraq and Syria, said Joshua Marcuse, the board’s executive director.

Next project:

The next project will focus on improving the coordination and management of airstrikes. An initial version could be available by next month, and DIUx is hopeful deployed airmen could use it within a few months, Oti said. Other programs planned will focus on compiling analytical data about airstrikes and studying potential targets.

Source: The Pentagon has tried to get Silicon Valley on its side for years. Now it’s part of the air war against ISIS.

What’s in Microsoft Azure Stack

Some BOM’ing of Azure Stack:

Azure Stack is made of two basic components, the underlying infrastructure that customers purchase from one of Microsoft’s certified partners (initially Dell EMC, HPE and Lenovo) and software that is licensed from Microsoft.The software includes basic IaaS functions that make up a cloud, such as virtual machines, storage and virtual networking. Azure Stack includes some platform-as-a-service (PaaS) application-development features including the Azure Container Service and Microsoft’s Azure Functions serverless computing software, plus MySQL and SQL Server support. It comes with Azure Active Directory for user authentication.Customers also have access to a wide range of third-party apps from the Azure Marketplace, including OS images from companies like Red Hat and SuSE, and templates that can be installed to run programs like Cloud Foundry, Kubernetes and Mesosphere.On the hardware side, Azure Stack runs on a hyperconverged infrastructure stack that Microsoft and its hardware vendors have certified. The smallest production-level Azure Stack deployment is a four-server rack with three physical switches and a lifecycle management server host. Individual racks can scale up to 12 servers, and eventually, multiple racks can be scaled together. Dell EMC, HPE and Lenovo are initial launch partners. Cisco plans to offer a certified Azure Stack platform based on its UCS hardware line by the end of 2017 and Huawei will roll out Azure Stack support by the end of 2018.IDC Data Center Networking Research Analyst Brad Casemore says he believes customers will need to run at least a 10 Gigabit Ethernet cabling with dual-port mixing. Converged network interface cards, support for BGP and data center bridging are important too. Microsoft estimates that a full-sized, 12-rack server unit of Azure Stack can supply about 400 virtual machines with 2 CPUs and 7 GB of RAM, with resiliency.

And Lydia explains the “people want private cloud ¯_(ツ)_/¯” angle:

“This is definitely a plus in the Microsoft portfolio,” says Gartner VP and Distinguished Analyst Lydia Leong, but she says it’s not right for every customer. “I don’t think this is a fundamental game-changer in the dynamics of the IaaS market,” she notes, but “this is going to be another thing to compel Microsoft-centric organizations to use Azure.”

Leong expects this could be beneficial for customers who want to use Azure but some reason such as regulations, data sensitivity, or location of data prevents them from using the public cloud. If a customer has sensitive data they’re not willing to put in the public cloud, they could deploy Azure Stack behind their firewall to process data, then relatively easily interact with applications and data in the public cloud.

Source: “Azure Stack: Microsoft’s private-cloud platform and what IT pros need to know about it,” Brandon Butler

Book: Crooked Little Vein

The writing in this book is good, and I’m always a sucker for noir.

But it gets tiresome after awhile, all the balls-out crazy stuff and topics.

There’s a lot to study about fiction dynamics here though fueled by the picador plotting: lots of interesting characters, lots of mini-plots; paring characters; the weak male/strong female trope; unlimited budget; snarky, but weary direct address tone to the reader; maybe world building, but just as the back-story for the various characters you meet (the serial killer on the airplane, the Roanokes, but the Bob character is ignored/anemic in this respect); social commentary as asides (from Trix, often); sex for titilation.

Obviously I liked it enough to quickly read it.

Pivotal Conversations: The Fat Baby in the Water: Cloud-Native Enterprise Architecture

Most DevOps people seem to think Enterprise Architects are on annoying uncle at Thanksgiving status. I’m not sure that’s exactly the case, but what an EA can do in a cloud-native organization isn’t exactly too well known and documented yet. This week Richard Seroter and I discuss the idea of a cloud-native architect.

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