Link: How Companies are Saving Millions with Pivotal Cloud Foundry

“A recent Forrester study commissioned by Pivotal which analyzed the benefits PCF customers see when adopting the platform found that developers gain 50 percent more coding hours a week. How? The automation and self-service features of Pivotal Cloud Foundry decrease manual and mundane deployment tasks. Wait times for environment setup and code to be prompted to production are also significantly reduced… That 50 percent gain in coding hours led to more releases per year, speeding up release schedules from once every two months to once a week — and sometimes even daily. Forrester estimates this increase in productivity equates to more than $31 million over three years, while the reduction in DevOps time allocated to provisioning, patching and scaling across multiple clouds at almost $6 million.”

Also, Rackspace has a managed Pivotal Cloud Foundry service.
Original source: How Companies are Saving Millions with Pivotal Cloud Foundry

Link: The New Affluents

Time to reap: “Several traits about the new affluents distinguish them as ideal prospective customers for brands of all sectors. In particular, luxury brands looking to woo customers with a little extra in their pockets might find this group a good place to start. Gen Xers’ share of national wealth is forecast to grow from under 14% in 2015 to nearly 31% by 2030, while Millennials’ share is forecast to grow from just 4% in 2015 to 16% by 2030, according to Gartner research. Additionally, this group is likely to be raising families and becoming first-time homebuyers, making them prime targets for home and CPG brands…. Though the new affluents want to save, they are likely to be in the midst of costly life transitions related to family and are also paying off significant debt, meaning money management is definitely on their mind.”
Original source: The New Affluents

Link: Penn Jillette, In Conversation

“The things I worry about the most is that I’m completely uneducated. You couldn’t even really give me credit with a high-school education. That troubles me a lot. If we had to discuss trigonometry I would have to go and actually do homework before I could talk about it. I also just don’t have a solid liberal education. People who are very well-educated always tell me that education means nothing. But that’s because they have it. I also know, because I keep a very elaborate journal, that I am unreliable in terms of what I’m talking about. These are all things which come down to my worrying about not knowing what I’m talking about, and that’s the worst kind of bullshit. Also, like anyone who’s had success, I tend to give lip service to luck.”
Original source: Penn Jillette, In Conversation

Link: Without a formal mandate

“In almost every case there are stakeholders who are moved by quantitative data (say the percentage of phone calls that could be avoided.) There are also other stakeholders who connect with qualitative human stories. The magic really happens when you offer both types of evidence. Telling the stories, and backing them up with data points for the cost or the impact of what is happening to people, this is evidence with impact. When you make it real for everyone, you can more effectively catalyze change.”

Also, a sort of case study of improving design in state government.
Original source: Without a formal mandate

Link: Without a formal mandate

“In almost every case there are stakeholders who are moved by quantitative data (say the percentage of phone calls that could be avoided.) There are also other stakeholders who connect with qualitative human stories. The magic really happens when you offer both types of evidence. Telling the stories, and backing them up with data points for the cost or the impact of what is happening to people, this is evidence with impact. When you make it real for everyone, you can more effectively catalyze change.”

Also, a sort of case study of improving design in state government.
Original source: Without a formal mandate

Link: Do you need a corporate vision in government IT?

“In an organisation like a local authority this is especially tough as they are such disparate entities. Think about it, in what strange universe does it make sense for a single organisation to collect taxes, deliver social care, pick up bins and operate transport? None of these and many of the other services councils deliver have much to do with each other, apart from the coincidence of local delivery… Coming up with a single vision or operating model for such an organisation is pretty tricky therefore, which makes it less likely that transformation teams are going to get one. So, without a clear destination, what should they be doing?… I think the key is to think of councils – and other similar organisations – as groups of individual businesses, rather than a single cohesive organisation.”
Original source: Do you need a corporate vision in government IT?