SUSE to Acquire HPE’s OpenStack, Cloud Foundry Portfolio, Boost Kubernetes Investment, TheNewStack

“We see PaaS as a strategic component of our software-defined infrastructure and application platform strategy,” stated SUSE President of Strategy, Alliances and Marketing Michael Miller, in a note to The New Stack, “and Cloud Foundry as the open source project and technology that brings together the best innovation and industry collaboration. We want to leverage that innovation for the benefit of our customers, and we have a vision for the convergence of CaaS technologies [in SUSE’s case, Containers as a service] like Docker and Kubernetes and PaaS technologies like Cloud Foundry that we think will address the real-world needs of our customers and partners. We will now work with the Cloud Foundry community to develop that vision.”

http://thenewstack.io/suse-add-hpes-openstack-cloud-foundry-portfolio-boost-kubernetes-investment/

Not actually a DevOps talk

digital-transformation

I get asked to talk on DevOps a lot. Here’s my current presentation, going over the why’s, the how’s, the technologies, and the meatware that supports including some best and worst practices based on what Pivotal customers do.

It’s brazenly promoting Pivotal, but that’s fine.

Much of it draws a lot on my cloud native journey booklets as well.

RFQ: Cloud Native Journey, 2nd edition WIP

2016-11-07-10-21-59

 

Like reading about doing agile, DevOps, and “cloud native” in the real world? Help me finish up my current booklet on that topic by reviewing my almost finished draft.

I’ve been working on this since around August of this year. I’m almost done! There’s some of my content you might have seen around the web here and there, but most of it is new. I’ve tried to wrap up all the common topics I talk about with large organizations and put in as many cases and anecdotes – proof and data! – from “donkey” organizations as possible.

Help me get more eyes on this, and also read an “early edition” before you have to get your boy Johnny Leadgen on the case.

The Container Landscape, choosing what to do now

A round-up of all sorts of container stacks, and some advice on what to do:

Therefore, the key lessons learned from this event (from developer’s perspective): Do not focus on developing code for the container under the hood. Care instead about the business logic. Implement your microservices in a vendor agnostic way.

Do not make the same fault as we all did with J2EE / Java EE where all vendors used the same standard specifications, but still offered many vendor-dependent features and “added value” in their specific “standard implementation”. Migration, i.e. deployment to another Java EE application server was a lot of efforts (re-development, testing, …); sometimes a complete re-write was easier and faster.

There’s a lot of fragmentation in container land now. This is what Linux must have felt like back in the late 90s.

Our advice at Pivotal, of course, is to focus on using Spring and other services towards the top of the stack for that layer of lock-in protection.

Link

Who’ll pay to “fix” trade, jobs, and wages?

“If he institutes a 35-percent penal tariff on every export from China, then most of what you buy at Walmart is 35 percent more expensive,” said Roger Entner, a wireless analyst at Recon Analytics.

The intention of plans like this is always to re-build the entire system and structure. That takes a long time, one assumes. So, what’s important is to describe how the transition phase works.

Another unstated assumption of such thinking is “corporations make too much profit,” that is, Apple and Wal-Mart should take the hit. I’d rather we be having a debate about that: how much money do individuals deserve versus corporate profits and how do we do anything about it?

Link

OpenStack users want deployment speed & want it cheaper

From Al’s report on the recent OpenStack Summit:

Based on a 451 Research Advisors survey of midsize and large enterprises, increasing operational efficiency and accelerating innovation/deployment speed are top business drivers for enterprise adoption of OpenStack, at 76% and 75%, respectively. Supporting DevOps is a close second, at 69%. Reducing cost and standardizing on OpenStack APIs were next, at 50% and 45%, respectively. The survey further shows diversity in vertical markets using OpenStack, with 80% of respondents being outside the tech industry.

The latest biannual release of OpenStack is Newton, and the community supporting it also shows diversity among the contributors. As of this 14th release, there are 64,549 community members from 187 countries, up from 50,000 six months ago. There are also 643 supporting companies, up from 578 for the same period. Newton also had a record number of developers contribute to the code: 2,581, versus 15 in the first release.

Source: OpenStack: the Sagrada Familia of cloud software?

Gig jobs have high churn, ~40-60% after a year

https://www.theatlas.com/charts/SypDOTv-x

Lots of charts that show a large percentage of workers leave after a year. Also, as better jobs come about, if wages don’t rise in gig jobs, churn will be even higher:

“It doesn’t look like [gig work] is becoming more lucrative for people,” says Fiona Greig, co-author on the JPMorgan Chase Institute report. “As the labor force strengthens in general, more and more people have better options.”

Source: People are quitting gig jobs in the sharing economy — Quartz

Prediction: “sub 10% growth” in 2017 at Indian IT services companies, Gartner

“[Gartner analyst Arup Roy] said Indian [IT services] companies, for example, should not expect double-digit sales revenue growth in 2017, adding that ‘a sub 10% growth for 2017 is certain.'”

But, the effect is likely to be on all large organizations who have been globalizing IT staffing:

“There is really no such thing as the Indian IT services sector. All companies would be affected. For example, Capgemini employs more people in India that in any other country. Legislation does not differentiate between Infosys, Capgemini or Accenture,” said Schumacher.

And:

In 2013, German car manufacturer Daimler said it planned to achieve savings of €150m a year by bringing IT services in-house and expanding IT operations in India and Turkey. In 2012, General Motors said it would insource around 90% of its heavily outsourced IT operations.

We talked about more “Trump’s possible effects on tech” in last week’s Software Defined Talk, with some extensive links and notes in the show notes if you don’t want to fill your ear-holes.

Source: Trump election win creates uncertain future for IT services sector

Keeping developer skills fresh

My co-worker Richard wrote up a laundry list of tactics to cultivate and maintain developer skills. It’s drawn from the tactics we’re seeing organizations put in place and a recent survey from the Cloud Foundry Foundation.

Internal events

While I used to scoff at internal brown bags and workshops, I’ve seen those be highly effective in organizations looking to buff up at their developer skills. It both transmits actually new information and shows developers that the company actually cares. Upping morale and skills is hard to beat.

Pairing

Also, it looks like the continual cross-training you get from pair programming is effective. Staff keeps up to date from the micro level of new keyboard short cuts to the big picture stuff like architectural patterns and domain knowledge. Plus, they learn and practice working together and trusting each other.

More survey findings

The developer survey that Richard kicks off with has some more interesting answers. Here’s some details from the survey:


– “By a nearly 2:1 margin, they are choosing training over hiring or outsourcing as the preferred method for addressing a shortage of skills in their own companies.”
– “We suspect that the companies further along in their cloud journey are doing more interesting things and are more risk tolerant; developers find those jobs more attractive. However, those companies that still primarily rely on legacy architectures, don’t push the envelope or are only very sluggishly making efforts toward digital transformation, struggle to hire and retain people that have the skills necessary.”
– “the majority of companies (62%) express confidence in the abilities of their developers to “keep current” with their IT knowledge and skills. At an individual level, however, only 47% of developers express confidence in their own ability to keep current.”
– “By a large percentage (60%), companies say they first adopt a technology—then upskill, train, or hire as necessary. This is preferred to selecting a new technology based on the skills already available in the company (40%).”
– “By and large, companies are addressing the shortage of skills by training or upskilling existing people rather than outsourcing (61% versus 39%) or hiring (62% versus 38%). They are making use of a variety of training methods from formal internal trainings, vendor-led trainings to informal trainings like ‘lunch-and-learns.'”
– It was done in 2016Q3, over 845 respondents in an online survey. “The survey divided respondents into four broad IT ‘roles’: Developer 30%, Operations 30%, Manager 20%, and Line of business leadership 20%.” And spread across geographies and industries.