The crowded cloud native space

The wider Cloud Native ecosystem is, however, a very disparate and confused place. We anticipate a significant level of consolidation over the next twelve to eighteen months with some clear winners emerging. The emergence of several opinionated distributions of Kubernetes is hardly a surprise and this space will expand a little further before settling down.

Link

The internet of food nutrition labels

“So anyone who is producing food that ends up in our grocery stores, we’re working with them to get the data from their labels and the packaging information to come right into the database for us,” Pamela Stark Reed, deputy administrator for Nutrition, Food Safety and Quality, said on Information Management month.

The database has actually existed for over a century, Reed said. But before starting the initiative, it only had about 8,000 entries. Since opening it up to manufacturer submission, ARS has received 80,000 new items, a 1000 percent increase.
And on future plans:

The goal for the database is to eventually expand to 1,000,000 items. Reed said ARS anticipates getting store brand and international food items into the database soon. Some items from chain restaurants may follow.

Because of this, the agency is looking into cloud services to increase its storage capacity.

Just imagine, globally, how many data sets like that there are. Throw in the workflow to injest and cleanup the data, and change it, plus APIs to access it, and you have an almost endless amount of projects for software eating.

http://federalnewsradio.com/information-management-month/2016/11/usda-turns-nutritional-data-open-data/

SUSE to Acquire HPE’s OpenStack, Cloud Foundry Portfolio, Boost Kubernetes Investment, TheNewStack

“We see PaaS as a strategic component of our software-defined infrastructure and application platform strategy,” stated SUSE President of Strategy, Alliances and Marketing Michael Miller, in a note to The New Stack, “and Cloud Foundry as the open source project and technology that brings together the best innovation and industry collaboration. We want to leverage that innovation for the benefit of our customers, and we have a vision for the convergence of CaaS technologies [in SUSE’s case, Containers as a service] like Docker and Kubernetes and PaaS technologies like Cloud Foundry that we think will address the real-world needs of our customers and partners. We will now work with the Cloud Foundry community to develop that vision.”

http://thenewstack.io/suse-add-hpes-openstack-cloud-foundry-portfolio-boost-kubernetes-investment/

Not actually a DevOps talk

digital-transformation

I get asked to talk on DevOps a lot. Here’s my current presentation, going over the why’s, the how’s, the technologies, and the meatware that supports including some best and worst practices based on what Pivotal customers do.

It’s brazenly promoting Pivotal, but that’s fine.

Much of it draws a lot on my cloud native journey booklets as well.

RFQ: Cloud Native Journey, 2nd edition WIP

2016-11-07-10-21-59

 

Like reading about doing agile, DevOps, and “cloud native” in the real world? Help me finish up my current booklet on that topic by reviewing my almost finished draft.

I’ve been working on this since around August of this year. I’m almost done! There’s some of my content you might have seen around the web here and there, but most of it is new. I’ve tried to wrap up all the common topics I talk about with large organizations and put in as many cases and anecdotes – proof and data! – from “donkey” organizations as possible.

Help me get more eyes on this, and also read an “early edition” before you have to get your boy Johnny Leadgen on the case.

The Container Landscape, choosing what to do now

A round-up of all sorts of container stacks, and some advice on what to do:

Therefore, the key lessons learned from this event (from developer’s perspective): Do not focus on developing code for the container under the hood. Care instead about the business logic. Implement your microservices in a vendor agnostic way.

Do not make the same fault as we all did with J2EE / Java EE where all vendors used the same standard specifications, but still offered many vendor-dependent features and “added value” in their specific “standard implementation”. Migration, i.e. deployment to another Java EE application server was a lot of efforts (re-development, testing, …); sometimes a complete re-write was easier and faster.

There’s a lot of fragmentation in container land now. This is what Linux must have felt like back in the late 90s.

Our advice at Pivotal, of course, is to focus on using Spring and other services towards the top of the stack for that layer of lock-in protection.

Link