Can you click in emacs? - Software Defined Talk #42

Summary

With VMworld coming up next week we talk tactics for surviving the show floor, Microsoft's cloud and container offerings, and the battle for defining the fragmented "platform" space.

With Brandon Whichard, Matt Ray, and Coté.

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Show notes

Recommendations

Beyond the accidental platform

Recording of a recent talk: No matter what, you end up with a platform - the collection of tools, practices, and services you use end-to-end to develop, deploy, and run your application. Many people aren't conscious of this fact and end up with an 'accidental platform. All I'd like to accomplish with this talk is convince you that you should definitely be conscious of the platform you're building and make sure it's not just an accidental one.

The Software Nihilist - Software Defined Talk #41

The Software Nihilist - Software Defined Talk #41

After finally settling an important RescueBots debate, we discuss keeping optimistic in the tech industry. And there's much to be (potentially) cynical about: bad work conditions at Amazon and the tech industry as whole, inscrutable restructuring at Google, and rumored fire-sales in the APM space. With a trust, detailed taxonomy of nihilism, somehow, we manage to keep it together nonetheless.

Setting goals is important for DevOps success

For my monthly column over at FierceDevOps I wrote about the importance of setting goals. I was motivated to write this by this point being repeated in Leading the Transformation many times, e.g.:

Management needs to establish strategic objectives that make sense and that can be used to drive plans and track progress at the enterprise level. These should include key deliverables for the business and process changes for improving the effectiveness of the organization.

It made me think that most of the corporate failures I've seen over the years were due to management being vague about what they wanted and what the team should be doing. Someone has to set the goals and, at the very least, it's management's job to make sure its done (they don't have to do it, though I tend to think they do: they just need to make sure it happens).

Anyhow, check out the piece!