Link: The Hidden Costs of Cloud Adoption

Despite it being aw some, you still have to pay for public cloud, and it’s pay as you go:

‘“Cloud is an inexpensive and easily accessible technology,” the infrastructure survey concludes. “People consume more, thereby spending more, and forget to control or limit their consumption.”‘

So:

“the market analyst found that 34 percent of enterprises polled said they have over the last year moved applications and data from a public cloud to either hosted private or on-premises private cloud.”
Original source: The Hidden Costs of Cloud Adoption

Link: Yes, DevOps is all about business growth, especially the digital variety

Vendor survey, but whatever: “A survey of 1,300 executives just released by CA Technologies and Freeform Dynamics finds that while 75 percent recognize that these approaches drive significant business success when implemented together, only a relatively small proportion — about one in five — consider the consistency, depth and breadth of usage of these practices to be high.”
Original source: Yes, DevOps is all about business growth, especially the digital variety

Link: Will 2018 be the year of the neo-luddite?

‘More significantly, the whole of society seems to have woken up to the fact there is a psychological cost to constant checking, swiping and staring. A growing number of my friends now have “no phone” times, don’t instantly sign into the cafe wifi, or have weekends away without their computers. This behaviour is no longer confined to intellectuals and academics, part of some clever critique of modernity. Every single parent I know frets about “screen time”, and most are engaged in a struggle with a toddler over how much iPad is allowed. The alternative is “slow living” or “slow tech”. “Want to become a slow-tech family?” writes Janell Burley Hoffmann, one of its proponents. “Wait! Just wait – in line, at the doctor’s, for the bus, at the school pickup – just sit and wait.” Turning what used to be ordinary behaviour into a “movement” is a very modern way to go about it. But it’s probably necessary.’
Original source: Will 2018 be the year of the neo-luddite?

Link: Foreign-Born Engineers Dominate Bay Area Tech Jobs

“Nearly three-quarters of Silicon Valley women who work in computer, mathematical, architectural, and engineering occupations were born outside of the U.S., mostly in Asia. That includes nearly 79 percent of those in computer and mathematical professions. The data showed slightly more than 70 percent of men in those professions are foreign born.”
Original source: Foreign-Born Engineers Dominate Bay Area Tech Jobs

Link: The Ivory Tower Can’t Keep Ignoring Tech

“[W]e shouldn’t have to depend on journalism to do the tedious, serious work of understanding the problems with algorithms any more than we depend on it to pursue the latest questions in sociology or environmental science.”

More: “There is essentially no distinct field of academic study that takes seriously the responsibility of understanding and critiquing the role of technology — and specifically, the algorithms that are responsible for so many decisions — in our lives.”
Original source: The Ivory Tower Can’t Keep Ignoring Tech

Link: The Kubernetes Lesson

“In modern software development organizations, however, what gets used in development and testing environments has a habit of showing up in production. This was the opportunity that Kubernetes was built to take advantage of. It provided developers with a means – an open source means, naturally – of taking the containers they were so enamored of and running them in production environments, but without having to make determinations such as which containers run on which hardware. In its initial incarnation, this was the simple, basic job that Kubernetes was hired for.”
Original source: The Kubernetes Lesson

Link: Trump’s Tariff Plan Leaves Blue-Collar Winners and Losers

“The mills and smelters that supply the raw material, and that would directly benefit from the tariffs, have been shrinking for years. Today, those industries employ fewer than 200,000 people. The companies that buy steel and aluminum, to make everything from trucks to chicken coops, employ more than 6.5 million workers, according to a Heritage Foundation analysis of Commerce Department data.”

Trade is hard.
Original source: Trump’s Tariff Plan Leaves Blue-Collar Winners and Losers