Churchill’s Daily Practice

This was despite his continuing large daily intake of alcohol. Harold Nicolson recalls a friend coming away from lunch with Churchill “rather shocked by . . . the immense amount of port and brandy he consumed.” On a typical day, according to his aide Sir Ian Jacob, Churchill drank champagne and brandy with lunch, then, after his afternoon nap, had two or three glasses of whisky and soda, then champagne and brandy with dinner, followed by more whisky and soda. Jacob noted that he also sometimes accompanied his breakfast with white wine.

From Churchill and Orwell: The Fight for Freedom.

Link: The Improbable Rise of the Daily News Podcast

Turns out there’s money in enclosure tags. Who knew? “In recent weeks, The Daily announced that it was becoming a national radio show. In doing so, it proved that scale can generate millions of dollars in new revenue, as well as (potentially) a hugely valuable spot on the national FM radio dial. That radio slot, in turn, will do wonders not only for The New York Times’ income statement, but also for its standing as a national brand. To put it another way: The Daily’s radio show won’t just make money on its own right, it will sell subscriptions to the newspaper and the website while doing so.”
Original source: The Improbable Rise of the Daily News Podcast

Link: Why men need more consideration in the women in tech debate

Having to watch the kids is a big problem
For gender imbalance in the workforce. Maybe dads can step the fuck up: “It’s also about asking men to ask for paternity leave. The amount of men that I know that say, well I’m given two weeks and that’s it. They don’t push it, they don’t even have the conversation with their boss. If they don’t step up to also try to equalize it, things won’t change…. I was asked time and time again who’s going to look after my kid. The attention went too far.”

Also: “I’m particularly interested in, and in support of, AbdulJaleel’s comment around seeing more men leaving leadership roles as a way of tackling the gender imbalance.”
Original source: Why men need more consideration in the women in tech debate

Link: The Hidden Costs of Cloud Adoption

Despite it being aw some, you still have to pay for public cloud, and it’s pay as you go:

‘“Cloud is an inexpensive and easily accessible technology,” the infrastructure survey concludes. “People consume more, thereby spending more, and forget to control or limit their consumption.”‘

So:

“the market analyst found that 34 percent of enterprises polled said they have over the last year moved applications and data from a public cloud to either hosted private or on-premises private cloud.”
Original source: The Hidden Costs of Cloud Adoption