Link: A 2-Year Stanford Study Shows the Astonishing Productivity Boost of Working From Home

“the robust, nearly two-year study showed an astounding productivity boost among the telecommuters equivalent to a full day’s work. Turns out work-from-home employees work a true full-shift (or more) versus being late to the office or leaving early multiple times a week and found it less distracting and easier to concentrate at home.”
Original source: A 2-Year Stanford Study Shows the Astonishing Productivity Boost of Working From Home

Link: For Women and Minorities to Get Ahead, Managers Must Assign Work Fairly

“For many women, the disparity in assignments comes back to what we’ve called maternal wall bias — a set of negative assumptions about mothers’ competence and commitment. After having a child, mothers come back to work to find that their best projects and clients have been reassigned to colleagues. In some cases, women report that it takes years to get back to the type of work they were doing before taking maternity leave. As a white female lawyer reported, “I made partner in the shortest time of any female. Things were great. I had my son. I worked part-time during leave and came back in nine weeks. My work was gone. It has taken two years and a change in focus to get back to the level I was at.”
Original source: For Women and Minorities to Get Ahead, Managers Must Assign Work Fairly

Link: Re-Hermit

“I can run a lot of windows on my screen, but eventually the screen fills up and I’m doing more clicking than viewing just to see everything that’s going on in my head. Which means that less is going on in my head because I’m doing more clicking than looking. Something like that.”
Original source: Re-Hermit

Link: Why men need more consideration in the women in tech debate

Having to watch the kids is a big problem
For gender imbalance in the workforce. Maybe dads can step the fuck up: “It’s also about asking men to ask for paternity leave. The amount of men that I know that say, well I’m given two weeks and that’s it. They don’t push it, they don’t even have the conversation with their boss. If they don’t step up to also try to equalize it, things won’t change…. I was asked time and time again who’s going to look after my kid. The attention went too far.”

Also: “I’m particularly interested in, and in support of, AbdulJaleel’s comment around seeing more men leaving leadership roles as a way of tackling the gender imbalance.”
Original source: Why men need more consideration in the women in tech debate

Link: Foreign-Born Engineers Dominate Bay Area Tech Jobs

“Nearly three-quarters of Silicon Valley women who work in computer, mathematical, architectural, and engineering occupations were born outside of the U.S., mostly in Asia. That includes nearly 79 percent of those in computer and mathematical professions. The data showed slightly more than 70 percent of men in those professions are foreign born.”
Original source: Foreign-Born Engineers Dominate Bay Area Tech Jobs

Link: Why Are We Still Talking About the ‘Millennial Problem’ in the Workfor

“All the ‘demands’ millennials have that people think are so outrageous are things everyone wants–work/life balance, recognition when they do a good job, a sense of purpose–this is all stuff managers should be giving to their employees, anyway,” says Michael Greer, a digital marketing consultant who has led employee training and development initiatives for over a decade. “The complaints and demands you’re hearing from your millennial employees are the same ones everyone else is grumbling about where you can’t hear them.”
Original source: Why Are We Still Talking About the ‘Millennial Problem’ in the Workfor

Link: America’s bias against working moms comes down to one question: Do you value your female employees or not?

Based on a 2013 survey, but still, fucked up:

“According to Pew, some 40% of Americans believe it is bad for society if women work, despite the fact that 40% of American households are supported by female breadwinners.”
Original source: America’s bias against working moms comes down to one question: Do you value your female employees or not?