🗂 Link: VMworld 2019: VMware expands its multicloud, security, Kubernetes strategies | ZDNet

VMware in the span of seven days set its strategy to grab more multicloud deployments, positioned itself in case developers favor containers over virtual machines in the future and reiterated its case as a go-to enterprise engine for digital transformation.

Source: VMworld 2019: VMware expands its multicloud, security, Kubernetes strategies | ZDNet

🗂 Link: Introducing VMware Tanzu Mission Control to Bring Order to Cluster Chaos

With VMware Tanzu Mission Control, we are providing customers with a powerful, API driven platform that allows operators to apply policy to individual clusters or groups of clusters, establishing guardrails and freeing developers to work within those boundaries.

Source: Introducing VMware Tanzu Mission Control to Bring Order to Cluster Chaos

🗂 Link: With Heptio and Pivotal, VMware Doubles Down on Kubernetes

The company introduced VMware Tanzu, a marketing name for a portfolio of products and services, existing and new, that will help enterprises build modern applications, run Kubernetes with consistency across environments, and manage all their Kubernetes clusters from a single control point. It will encompass aspects of its recent purchase of Bitnami, a library of packaged installers for web applications and development stacks, and the planned acquisition of Pivotal, which offers application development tools, data management products, and analytics intelligence platforms.

Also, from Gartner analyst Paul Delory:

“Kubernetes is too complex for the average IT shop to build and operate effectively. We’ve known this for a while,” he said. “Because of this, the public cloud providers have all created their own managed K8S offerings. But these are cloud-specific, and not interoperable.

“So now IT shops have silos of K8S infrastructure living in different clouds. Someone has to be the one who can manage all this infrastructure, across clouds, and make it work together. VMware says they’re the one to do it. I am cautiously optimistic.”

Source: With Heptio and Pivotal, VMware Doubles Down on Kubernetes

🗂 Link: VMware plan elevates Kubernetes to star enterprise status

A swag at how many new apps will be created to run on kubernetes cloud stuff. I assume this is actually existing, modernized apps and net-new ones despite the wording:

VMware says that from 2018 to 2023 – with new tools/platforms, more developers, agile methods, and lots of code reuse – 500 million new logical apps will be created serving the needs of many application types and spanning all types of environments.

Source: VMware plan elevates Kubernetes to star enterprise status

🗂 Link: VMware is bringing VMs and containers together, taking advantage of Heptio acquisition

“Kubernetes is a way of bringing a control metaphor to modern IT processes. You provide an expression of what you want to have happen, and then Kubernetes takes that and interprets it and drives the world into that desired state,” McLuckie explained.

More from another article:

The Tanzu portfolio also includes Project Galleon, which harnesses the packaging technology of VMware’s recent acquisition of Bitnami, to provide developers with an easy way to assemble software stacks. It will include a Platform as a Service development platform on its pending purchase of Pivotal. It also includes VMware Tanzu Mission Control, which will provide administrators with an overview of all Kubernetes clusters.

Source: VMware is bringing VMs and containers together, taking advantage of Heptio acquisition

Link: VMworld 2018: Pivotal Container Service and the Long Road to NoOps

[Swisscom’s] Massalt polled the audience, asking how many of them had experience with updating their Kubernetes clusters. No one, in a reasonably full ballroom, raised a hand.

“There’s a reason for this: because it’s a painful process,” he said. It’s why Swisscom had already adopted BOSH as an automated deployment tool for replacing old versions and updating the underlying platform, thus taking care of a large chunk of Day-2 operations.
Original source: VMworld 2018: Pivotal Container Service and the Long Road to NoOps

Link: VMworld 2018: VMware Wants to Re-Architect Your Containers for NSX – The New Stack

“The developer shouldn’t have to know how to program NSX, or know what the security isolation boundaries are,” continued Fazzone. “But they should know that their organization has taken steps to unify the networking approach between the containerized applications and the traditional applications running in VMs, and take advantage of that ‘service’ offered by IT to extend the NSX-T support up into their container platform, versus just defaulting to the Layer 2 default that’s available in the open source community — so that their organization can realize that complete connectivity model in a consistent way.”
Original source: VMworld 2018: VMware Wants to Re-Architect Your Containers for NSX – The New Stack

Link: VMware’s vision – your multi-cloud substrate for enterprise applications

“Support for VMware’s NSX virtual network over AWS Direct Connect links that allow extending network configuration and security policies from an enterprise data center to AWS. It also enhanced NSX features on the AWS Cloud to include better control over intra-cloud traffic and support for micro-segmented security policies. Support for high-speed Direct Connect links also facilitates application and data migration or busting to the cloud. Further smoothing the path to the cloud, VMware introduced what it calls a data center evacuation service that enables the live or scheduled migration of thousands of VMs with no downtime. It also offers a free cost estimation service to help determine the financial implications of cloud placement for different workloads.”
Original source: VMware’s vision – your multi-cloud substrate for enterprise applications

Coté Memo #031: Avoiding Showing Up, Yet Another Private Equity in Tech Story, Cyborgs, and more #VMworld

Title: Coté Memo #031: Avoiding Showing Up, Yet Another Private Equity in Tech Story, Cyborgs, and more #VMworld

Meta-data

Hello again, welcome to #31. Today we have 39 subscribers, so we’re +1. I’d love to hear what you like, dislike, your feedback, etc.: memo@cote.io. (If you’re reading this on the web, you should subscribe to get the daily email.)

See past newsletters in the archives, and, as always, see things as they come at Cote.io and @cote.

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Tech & Work World

Quick Hits

It’s a real project if…, or, avoiding showing up to save time

I liked the quick summary of determining if something is a real project or not on this week’s Back to Work. I spend much of time sorting out if I should get involved in a project or not, both internal to 451 and externally. In analyst life, there’s lots of people looking for open-ended projects with no budget, and those become time-sucks that marks like me end-up carrying the water for.

I spend a lot of time observing behavior of other people in the companies I work for, mostly the people who are considered “successful.” What I’ve noticed is that those successful people don’t do much, in a good way. They’re highly selective of the projects they get involved with, and even the email threads they answer.

If you’re the kind of person who subscribes and actually reads this newsletter, you likely have the problem I have: you get bored easily and use work as a way to entertain yourself…instead of using work as a way to get paid. I’ve got to shift more and more of my efforts to that second part, because the first creates a stream of unfinished projects that go nowhere and becomes a terrible loop of boredom on its own.

451’s VMworld 2014 pieces are coming out

The names may have changed, which makes it quite difficult to track both historical usage and forward-looking plans, but at the end of the day marketing departments like to change names to protect the guilty. Whatever the products are called today, or may be called in the future, it is clear that the hypervisor-level technologies that are the basis of VMware’s current market dominance are commoditizing. This provides leverage but no guarantee of future market share for VMware in adjacent markets (management and cloud platforms), which have notable established incumbents and a set of engagement rules that are not necessarily aligned with VMware’s historical success factors.

Hey, don’t worry: that vRealize one is on the kitchen island ready to cook up.

Private Equity, which was the style of the time

All the sudden so many large tech companies are looking to go private. TIBCO did the obligatory hanging out a sign recently, it seems. Of course, I’m sure many are all like “TIBwho?” which is fine (and if you’re a TIBwhu? person, you’ll love this discussion of Compuware!). If you couple this trend with another macro-theory, that IT spending is slowing down, permanently, then you’ve got something slightly interesting. Tech becomes normal.

Fun & IRL

There’s only two days left to upload several years worth of photos to my newly TB’ed Dropbox account. Yup. Try not to do that.