Link: VMworld 2018: Pivotal Container Service and the Long Road to NoOps

[Swisscom’s] Massalt polled the audience, asking how many of them had experience with updating their Kubernetes clusters. No one, in a reasonably full ballroom, raised a hand.

“There’s a reason for this: because it’s a painful process,” he said. It’s why Swisscom had already adopted BOSH as an automated deployment tool for replacing old versions and updating the underlying platform, thus taking care of a large chunk of Day-2 operations.
Original source: VMworld 2018: Pivotal Container Service and the Long Road to NoOps

Link: VMworld 2018: VMware Wants to Re-Architect Your Containers for NSX – The New Stack

“The developer shouldn’t have to know how to program NSX, or know what the security isolation boundaries are,” continued Fazzone. “But they should know that their organization has taken steps to unify the networking approach between the containerized applications and the traditional applications running in VMs, and take advantage of that ‘service’ offered by IT to extend the NSX-T support up into their container platform, versus just defaulting to the Layer 2 default that’s available in the open source community — so that their organization can realize that complete connectivity model in a consistent way.”
Original source: VMworld 2018: VMware Wants to Re-Architect Your Containers for NSX – The New Stack

Link: VMware’s vision – your multi-cloud substrate for enterprise applications

“Support for VMware’s NSX virtual network over AWS Direct Connect links that allow extending network configuration and security policies from an enterprise data center to AWS. It also enhanced NSX features on the AWS Cloud to include better control over intra-cloud traffic and support for micro-segmented security policies. Support for high-speed Direct Connect links also facilitates application and data migration or busting to the cloud. Further smoothing the path to the cloud, VMware introduced what it calls a data center evacuation service that enables the live or scheduled migration of thousands of VMs with no downtime. It also offers a free cost estimation service to help determine the financial implications of cloud placement for different workloads.”
Original source: VMware’s vision – your multi-cloud substrate for enterprise applications

Link: Cloud Native Computing Foundation Accepts Harbor Into CNCF Sandbox

“Harbor is a privately hosted registry, which allows running either on-premises or in any of the major cloud vendors, making it a possibility for organizations that cannot use a public container registry or want to implement a multi-cloud strategy. Harbor started as an internal VMware project and became open source in 2016. Multiple partners, including companies like Pivotal and Rancher, either use Harbor for their container-based environment or work together with Harbor to give the possibility of running the project on their infrastructure. For instance, the Pivotal Container Service includes Harbor as its built-in container registry. For Rancher, Harbor is one of the packages you can deploy to provide a container registry. Moreover, Harbor gives the option to set up multiple instances of these registries on several of these platforms simultaneously and allows replication between them. Through the signing and vulnerability scanning capabilities provided by the project, it turns these into trusted resources.”
Original source: Cloud Native Computing Foundation Accepts Harbor Into CNCF Sandbox

Link: Forrester SVP: VMware Is One Of The ‘Exciting’ Stars Of IT Automation Era

‘O’Donnell called VMware and Pivotal the “crown jewels” of Dell’s $70 billion blockbuster acquisition of EMC in 2015. “It’s the future,” said O’Donnell. “It’s the software side of it. A lot of good stuff came with EMC but what VMware and Pivotal are doing is the future. It’s all about software.”‘
Original source: Forrester SVP: VMware Is One Of The ‘Exciting’ Stars Of IT Automation Era

Link: ​Ubuntu’s Mark Shuttleworth pulls no punches on Red Hat and VMware in OpenStack cloud

“If you want OpenStack and Kubernetes support with vendor independence at a low price, Canonical is your company. If you prefer a partner, which offers a soup-to-nuts stack, but at a higher price, look to Red Hat. And, of course, if you’re already wedded to VMware, you’ve made your choice. There’s room for all these approaches to the 21st century cloud and containers.”
Original source: ​Ubuntu’s Mark Shuttleworth pulls no punches on Red Hat and VMware in OpenStack cloud

Link: ​Ubuntu’s Mark Shuttleworth pulls no punches on Red Hat and VMware in OpenStack cloud

“If you want OpenStack and Kubernetes support with vendor independence at a low price, Canonical is your company. If you prefer a partner, which offers a soup-to-nuts stack, but at a higher price, look to Red Hat. And, of course, if you’re already wedded to VMware, you’ve made your choice. There’s room for all these approaches to the 21st century cloud and containers.”
Original source: ​Ubuntu’s Mark Shuttleworth pulls no punches on Red Hat and VMware in OpenStack cloud

Link: ​Ubuntu’s Mark Shuttleworth pulls no punches on Red Hat and VMware in OpenStack cloud

“If you want OpenStack and Kubernetes support with vendor independence at a low price, Canonical is your company. If you prefer a partner, which offers a soup-to-nuts stack, but at a higher price, look to Red Hat. And, of course, if you’re already wedded to VMware, you’ve made your choice. There’s room for all these approaches to the 21st century cloud and containers.”
Original source: ​Ubuntu’s Mark Shuttleworth pulls no punches on Red Hat and VMware in OpenStack cloud