Link: America is turning against facial-recognition software

Sometimes scepticism about technology comes from the cops. Earlier this year the Washington Post reported that many small police departments were abandoning body-worn-camera programmes because of the cost. Although the cameras are cheap, officers can generate 15 gigabytes of video per shift; storage costs mount. Police unions often oppose body-worn cameras, fearing they imperil their members by giving superior officers licence to search them for punishable behaviour. Other officers complain about the amount of time required to review and redact footage in response to public-information requests. They also seem not to work. A study from George Mason University released in March found that body-worn cameras had no “statistically significant or consistent effects” on people’s views on police, or on police or civilian behaviour.

Source: America is turning against facial-recognition software

Twitter’s video deals mean it’s giving up on business model innovation

So says Ben Thompson in his newsletter today:

This is why Twitter’s increased focus on securing these video deals feels like such an admission of failure: the company is basically admitting that, despite the fact it contains some of the best content — given to it for free — in the world, it simply can’t figure out how to make that into a business, so instead it is (presumably) paying to create content that it can monetize more easily. The Bloomberg deal, which was first reported on Sunday, is particularly poignant on this point: Twitter is (again, presumably) paying for content about business and financial markets even as the most valuable business and financial market information is being posted for free on Twitter. That the company cannot build a business on that fact is certainly a disappointment.

You’ll have to subscribe to read the rest. For $100 a year, it’s worth it.

Meanwhile, some stats from Sara Fischer at Axios:

In total, Twitter has closed over 40 live stream partnerships around the world with sports leagues, media companies, etc. The company increased live programming by 60% last quarter and aired roughly 800 hours of live content reaching 45 million viewers. Of those hours, 51% were sports, 35% were news and politics, and 14% were entertainment. Above all, Twitter says 55% of its unique viewers are under the age of 25, a stat that directly competes with Snapchat’s coveted millennial demographic.

There’s also an extensive list of the video partnerships and shows to be broadcast in Twitter.

Snapchat spending $400m/yr. on Google Cloud

The biz has also just signed a deal to spend $400m a year on Google’s cloud hosting over the next five years – that’s $2bn in total for the Gmail giant.

That’s an amazing chunk of spend for a hats on cats business. Hopefully, Ben Thompson’s theories that Snapchat is the new TV pan out.

Link

Stop Hitting Yourself. Tips for Succeeding at Digital Transformation

Check out this fine panel from DellEMCWorld:

Observations on how large organizations successfully go through Digital transformation.
When it comes to digital transformation, despite vast resources, large organizations are 40% less likely to be high performing organizations than smaller ones.