Docker and kubernetes

Dave Bartoletti, an analyst with IT consultancy Forrester, said it’s clear that Kubernetes has won at the orchestration layer. “There’s too much mindshare around it,” he said in a phone interview with The Register. “There are too many developers who just want this.”

Pretty much everyone has the sentiment that kubernetes has won.

More details from Joseph Tsidulko at CRN:

While some components of Enterprise Edition previously could be made to work with Kubernetes, the crucial control plane for managing the lifecycle of containerized applications was incompatible. Docker, however, had participated in the Kubernetes project, and always believed the technologies were complementary, Chanana said.
Docker is now focused on building out the components needed to make Kubernetes an enterprise-grade solution, just as it did with Swarm, he said, including security, high availability, and ease of use through its existing tools and control plane. Those are capabilities Docker uniquely can deliver to ease a lot of the struggles customers face in taking advantage of Kubernetes’ advanced container-scheduling capabilities.

Source: Kubernetes has won. Docker Enterprise Edition to support rival container-wrangling tech

Stateless apps in one, stateful apps in the other

It happens to be the case that CF — because it’s an app platform and wants to let the user focus on their code — provides a way to convert code in to containers inside the platform without having to start messing around with Dockerfiles and the like. And this functionality even does some cool things for you like keeping your container OS automatically patched so you don’t have to build CI pipelines to monitor your base images and rebuild stuff.

That’s why I love Cloud Foundry’s Application Runtime. Of course, because of these constraints — the constraints that are why I love it — the App Runtime can’t possibly work for complex stateful services: the whole point is for it not to. And that’s why it’s fantastic that there’s now a Container Runtime (which I wish we’d called a Stateful Services Runtime because that’s how I think of it).

Source: CF vs Kube: Is the difference who creates the container?

Small experiments to solve big problems

Try to go beyond hand waving and opinions and find out what really is happening. A good way to start is to ask people to picture what their scenario would look like if everything was perfect. This puts them into a positive frame and helps focus on great outcomes. Once you’re sure you’re working on an improvement opportunity that’s worth your time, try small time-bound experiments that you actually follow through on. Use what you learn to come up with the next step. I’ve found that the combination of being bold with the vision but taking small steps to get there is a good combination.

Source: The Spotify Model is No “Agile Nirvana”

Puppet’s new pipeline & kubernetes tools

The three new Puppet products based on Distelli’s technology are Puppet Pipelines for Apps, which automates key application development and delivery tasks; Puppet Pipelines for Containers, which enables users to build Docker images from a repository and deploy them to Kubernetes clusters; and Puppet Container Registry, which gives developers a comprehensive view of their Docker images across all repositories.

Source: Puppet Launches Barrage Of Products To Enable ‘New Age’ Of Software Automation And DevOps

The Serverless Revolution Will Make Us All Developers

Consider the case of the connected cows.

The grand unified, cloud/AI/IoT/serverless theory:

That was the essence of the Build keynote: The cloud interprets IoT telemetry, in real time, with AI. And that AI can, in turn, instruct other IoT devices to do things based on its interpretation.

Source: The Serverless Revolution Will Make Us All Developers

Private cloud: avoiding an existential crisis

451 Research’s data points suggest that some workloads are likely to remain on private cloud regardless of any disruptor’s attack. And even with hungry cloud providers eyeing private workloads, growth is likely to continue across all cloud models, not just public cloud.

Whole bunch of survey numbers tryin’ figure out how many workloads will stay on private cloud.

Source: Private cloud: avoiding an existential crisis