Link: Stop Playing Devil’s Advocate, and Other Advice for Better Decision Making

I think the idea is, they know the devil’s advocate is a game, so they don’t take it seriously enough to be useful:

“When someone truly believes something different than you do, it has a stimulating quality for your own thinking. When you’re roleplaying, you can’t argue with the person who’s pretending, if you will. People are under the illusion that since the information is the same, the two conversations should be equivalent. They put a devil’s advocate in because they think you’re going to get somebody who gets you to think about the alternative, and you’re not going to get mad at each other. What they underestimate is that devil’s advocates don’t make you think about the alternative decision. Playing devil’s advocate does not have the stimulating quality [one] hopes for. I don’t think it has to do with the information that devil’s advocates state. I think it has to do with the fact that they believe something very differently than you do, and that challenge is sort of like a smack on the head, if you will, that gets you to start to rethink the issue. And so there’s power in that.”
Original source: Stop Playing Devil’s Advocate, and Other Advice for Better Decision Making

Link: Stop Playing Devil’s Advocate, and Other Advice for Better Decision Making

I think the idea is, they know the devil’s advocate is a game, so they don’t take it seriously enough to be useful:

“When someone truly believes something different than you do, it has a stimulating quality for your own thinking. When you’re roleplaying, you can’t argue with the person who’s pretending, if you will. People are under the illusion that since the information is the same, the two conversations should be equivalent. They put a devil’s advocate in because they think you’re going to get somebody who gets you to think about the alternative, and you’re not going to get mad at each other. What they underestimate is that devil’s advocates don’t make you think about the alternative decision. Playing devil’s advocate does not have the stimulating quality [one] hopes for. I don’t think it has to do with the information that devil’s advocates state. I think it has to do with the fact that they believe something very differently than you do, and that challenge is sort of like a smack on the head, if you will, that gets you to start to rethink the issue. And so there’s power in that.”
Original source: Stop Playing Devil’s Advocate, and Other Advice for Better Decision Making

Link: Oracle plans to end Java serialization, but that’s not the end of the story

‘Oracle’s chief architect, Mark Reinhold, shared his thoughts about Java’s serialization mechanism which he called a “horrible mistake” and a virtually endless source of security vulnerabilities. This is evident in nearly half of the vulnerabilities that have been patched in the JDK in the last 2 years are related to serialization. Serialization security issues have also plagued almost every software vendor including Apache, Oracle, Pivotal, Cisco, McAfee, HP, Adobe, VMWare, Samsung, and others.’
Original source: Oracle plans to end Java serialization, but that’s not the end of the story

Link: What is “digital”?

“I tend to (rather crudely) break down what digital transformation could mean into three broad categories: (1) Digital access – taking a paper or telephone based process and whacking it online with an e-form (quick to do, few benefits except a bit of convenience for web savvy users); (2) Digital efficiency – taking that process and digitising it end to end, involving the replacement or integration with back office systems, removing unnecessary admin touch points an so on (takes longer, more difficult, but yields better results); (3)Digital transformation – taking an entire service and rethinking it from the ground up, knowing what we know about networks and connectivity (really hard, but could ensure the relevance of that service for the next 20 years).”
Original source: What is “digital”?