Link: Digital Transformation: Why Culture Is So Key

Culture is the most important factor, way more important than technology, for example. By culture, we mean a set of shared values and beliefs that drive a change in behaviors. This has to be both a top-down and a bottom-up approach. The CEO and the C-level executives must embody the culture and the DNA of the brand so that employees change their behaviors to better serve their clients. A great example of this was shared by Frédéric Oudéa, the CEO of Société Générale, when receiving the 2018 prize (see picture below): He regularly (once a month) spends time learning how to code in order to understand IT/software issues and directly listen to clients and employees. Another example comes from C-level executives at Generali or Air Liquide, which spend time regularly to call back detractors themselves.
Original source: Digital Transformation: Why Culture Is So Key

Link: Digital Transformation: Why Culture Is So Key

Culture is the most important factor, way more important than technology, for example. By culture, we mean a set of shared values and beliefs that drive a change in behaviors. This has to be both a top-down and a bottom-up approach. The CEO and the C-level executives must embody the culture and the DNA of the brand so that employees change their behaviors to better serve their clients. A great example of this was shared by Frédéric Oudéa, the CEO of Société Générale, when receiving the 2018 prize (see picture below): He regularly (once a month) spends time learning how to code in order to understand IT/software issues and directly listen to clients and employees. Another example comes from C-level executives at Generali or Air Liquide, which spend time regularly to call back detractors themselves.
Original source: Digital Transformation: Why Culture Is So Key

Link: A useful big data story

In 2011 Friedberg decided to sell exclusively to farmers, and WeatherBill changed its name to The Climate Corporation. “We needed to feel a little less Silicon Valley and less whimsical,” said Friedberg. For the next few years he would spend half his time on the road, explaining himself to people whose first step was toward mistrust. “Farmers don’t believe anything,” he said. “There’s always been some bullshit product for farmers. And the people selling it are usually from out of town.”

He’d sit down in some barn or wood shop, pull out his iPad, and open up a map of whatever Corn Belt state he happened to be in. He’d let the farmer click on his field. Up popped the odds of various unpleasant weather events—a freeze, a drought, a hailstorm—and his crops’ sensitivity to them. He’d show the farmer how much money he would have made in each of the previous thirty years if he had bought weather insurance. Then David Friedberg, Silicon Valley kid, would teach the farmer about his own fields. He’d show the farmer exactly how much moisture the field contained at any given moment—above a certain level, the field would be damaged if worked on. He’d show him the rainfall and temperature every day—which you might think the farmer would know, but then the farmer might be managing twenty or thirty different fields, spread over several counties. He’d show the farmer the precise stage of growth of his crop, the best moments to fertilize, the optimum eight-day window to plant his seeds, and the ideal harvest date.

From The Fifth Risk.
Original source: A useful big data story

Link: DOJ approves $69B CVS-Aetna merger as healthcare industry restructures

CVS, which racked up about $185 billion in revenue last year, runs the country’s largest retail-pharmacy chain and provides prescription plans to more than 94 million customers. By joining forces with Aetna—the nation’s third-largest health-insurance provider with over 22 million medical members, earning $60 billion in revenue in 2017—CVS will have a tight grasp on the market. The combined enterprise aims to be a first-line health care hub with clinics in its ubiquitous brick-and-mortar stores.
Original source: DOJ approves $69B CVS-Aetna merger as healthcare industry restructures

Link: ‘The gulf between apps and infrastructure is blurring’ says boss of DevOps darling Puppet

Their portfolio:

Puppet Bolt, the company’s simplified open source automation framework, hit version 1.0; Puppet Insights, a tool for measuring how fast and how well teams commit code, showed up as a private beta; Puppet Discovery, for corralling IT resources, moved on to version 1.6; Pipelines for Containers 3.3 got Helm support; and Puppet Enterprise 2019 and Continuous Delivery for Puppet Enterprise 2.0 reached general availability.
Original source: ‘The gulf between apps and infrastructure is blurring’ says boss of DevOps darling Puppet

Link: SRE: The Biggest Lie Since Kanban

That’s why SRE is a Big Lie – because it enables people to say they’re doing a thing that could help their organization succeed, and their dev and ops engineers to have a better career and life while doing so – but not really do it. Yes, there have been Big Lies before, which is why I cite Kanban as another example – but even if the new criminal is pretty much like the old criminal, you still put their picture up on the post office wall.

If something you’re selling is profoundly misused it’s your responsibility to be more up front about the issues.
Original source: SRE: The Biggest Lie Since Kanban

Link: The Demise of Blockbuster, and Other Failure Fairy Tales

Strategy is hard, execution at the middle-management later is harder.

What’s missing from the story is that PARC delivered on its mission. In fact, it saved Xerox from the fate of Kodak. While its copier business was disrupted by smaller Japanese competitors like Canon and Ricoh, one component of the Star system, the laser printer, replaced the revenues lost from its cash cow and Xerox continued to grow. It also earned millions from licensing technology it invented and, it should be noted, from its investment in Apple.
Original source: The Demise of Blockbuster, and Other Failure Fairy Tales