Beyond disintermediation

I don’t think of Uber as a force that dis-intermediates—as we olds used to say—transportation, but one that creates value for itself, its drivers, and its users, by developing a new layer that integrates them all with maximum utility. A very talented developer once told me that the secret to a world-beating service like Dropbox was to make something very, very complicated seem devastatingly simple. To me, uberizing meant trapping a series of innovative processes—phone-enabled geo-location, payments and driver management and distribution—into an app-accessible service.

That’s good framing. It’s not (just) removing a middleman, it’s better overall UX. One might even say “design.”

Beyond disintermediation

Consumers aren’t rational

But IT business buyers are, he says, and don’t know how make speeds and feeds (the basis of their buying behavior, plus price) account for UX:

The business buyer, famously, does not care about the user experience. They are not the user, and so items that change how a product feels or that eliminate small annoyances simply don’t make it into their rational decision making process.

Consumers aren’t rational