2017 Cloud Foundry Application Runtime Survey – Highlights

There’s a new survey out from the Cloud Foundry Foundation, looking at the users of Cloud Foundry. Here’s some highlights and notes:

  • Another ClearPath joint, n=735.
  • It’s important to keep in mind that this is covers all distress of Cloud Foundry, including open source (no vendor involved).
  • “The percentage of user respondents who require over three months
    per app drops from 51 percent to 18 percent after deploying Cloud Foundry Application Runtime”
  • “…while the percentage of user respondents who require less than a week climbs from 16 percent to 46 percent.”
  • “Nearly half (49 percent) of Cloud Foundry Application Runtime users are large enterprises ($1+ billion annual revenue).”
  • This chart is hard to read, but it shows a reduction in time to deploy across various time periods:
    before-after-release.
  • Uptake is early, but there are definitely mature users: “A plurality of Cloud Foundry Application Runtime users (61 percent) describe their deployments as somewhere in the early stages—trial, PoC, evaluation, or a partial integration into specific business units. Meanwhile, 39 percent have deployed Cloud Foundry Application Runtime more broadly across their company, from total integration in specific business groups to company-wide deployment.”
  • “Comcast, for example has more than 1500 developers using Cloud Foundry Application Runtime daily. Home Depot reports more than 2500 developers.”
  • “Comcast has seen between 50 percent and 75 percent improvement in productivity.”
  • “Half of Cloud Foundry Application Runtime users are currently using containers, such as Docker or rkt, with another 35 percent evaluating or deploying containers.”
  • Container management – there’s a wide variety of tools that people use for container orchestration, including DIY (14%). There’s a lot of interest in having CF do it: “Nearly three-quarters (71 percent) of Cloud Foundry Application Runtime users currently using or evaluating containers are interested in adding container orchestration and management to their Cloud Foundry Application Runtime environment.” Hence, validating the Cloud Foundry Container Runtime.
  • Of course, the surveyed are already CF users, so they’re biased/driven by what they know.
  • Almost half of respondents say that getting started with CF. But people end up liking it: “An overwhelming majority of users (83 percent) would recommend Cloud Foundry Application Runtime to a colleague, including 60 percent who would do so strongly.”
  • “As more companies roll out Cloud Foundry Application Runtime more broadly, the footprint continues to grow. Currently, 46 percent of users have more than 10 apps deployed on Cloud Foundry Application Runtime, including 18 percent with over 100 (and eight percent with over 500).” 4% have over 1,000 apps.
  • CF’s uses: “The primary use is for microservices (54 percent), followed by websites (38 percent), internal business applications (31 percent), Software-as-a-Service (SaaS) (27 percent) and legacy software (eight percent).”
  • Validating multi-cloud: “60 percent say this is very important, and another 30 percent describe it as somewhat important.” Meanwhile, 53% are using more than one type of IaaS.

The eternal battle for OpenStack’s soul will conclude in three years. Again – My May Register column

“What types of clouds are running OpenStack?” OpenStack Survey, 2017.

My column at The Register this month looks at the state of OpenStack. As Matt Asay better headlined it “CIOs may not want to build private clouds, but they are, anyway.”

Check out the piece!

Containers in production survey, RedMonk/Anchore – Highlights

Some highlights from a recent survey on container usage among 338 respondents to a Anchore/DevOps.com survey:

Containers in production:
anchore-cu
…approximately one third of the participants are running containers in production, with development coming in slightly higher.
OS used:
Looking at the top five host operating systems across user roles we see Ubuntu having a particular strong lead among developers and architects.
Mesos, architect-types like it:
Interestingly Mesos still features strongly with architects. Among developer communities we very rarely hear Mesos mentioned anymore. On the other hand we frequently encounter architects have invested in Mesos from the perspective of their big data environments and are looking at a common approach for their container strategy. That said, this entire market is extremely fluid at the moment.
Jenkins leads CI:
…the combination of Jenkins and CloudBees (commercial Jenkins) approaching 50%.
Security worries:
Bluntly put [security] presents a barrier to adoption, and an opportunity for conservative organisations to hold off on adopting new technologies.
Demographics:
Our population breaks out with over 60% working in companies of greater than 100 people [and ~30% working in companies of greater than 5,000 people]…. With any data set of this nature, it is important to state that survey results strictly reflect the members of the DevOps.com community.
More context:
  • As you’ll recall, 451 estimates that the container market will be $2.7bn in 2020.
  • A 451 Research 1Q16 survey puts production use of containers at ~14%. It’s likely risen sense then, of course: maybe to around 18 to 20%?
  • A 3Q2015 survey put “container orchestration” use at just ~9%. Presumably this is dev/test and production, all uses. And, again, you’d assume that it’s risen since then. The question would be: are people using containers in production without orchestration? That seems slightly crazy except for the simplest workloads, eh?

On-premise IT holding steady around 65% of enterprise workloads – Highlights

barfing cloud.png

One of the more common questions I’ve had over the years is: “but, surely, everyone is just in the public cloud, right?” I remember having a non-productive debate with a room full of Forrester analysts back in about 2012 where they were going on and on about on-premise IT being dead. There was much talk about electricity outlets. To be fair, the analysts were somewhat split, but the public cloud folks were adamant. You can see this same sentiment from analysts (including, before around 2011, myself!) in things like how long it’s taken to write about private PaaS, e.g., the PaaS magic quadrant has only covered public PaaS since inception).

Along these lines, the Uptime Institute has some survey numbers out. Here’s some highlights:

Some 65% of enterprise workloads reside in enterprise owned and operated data centers—a number that has remained stable since 2014, the report found. Meanwhile, 22% of such workloads are deployed in colocation or multi-tenant data center providers, and 13% are deployed in the cloud, the survey found….

On-prem solutions remain dominant in the enterprise due to massive growth in business critical applications and data for digital transformation, Uptime Institute said
Public cloud workload penetration:
Some 95% of IT professionals said they had migrated critical applications and IT infrastructure to the cloud over the past year, according to another recent survey from SolarWinds.
Budgets:

That survey also found that nearly half of enterprises were still dedicating at least 70% of their yearly budget to traditional, on-premise applications, potentially pointing to growing demand for a hybrid infrastructure….

Nearly 75% of companies’ data center budgets increased or stayed consistent in 2017, compared to 2016, the survey found.

Metrics, KPIs, and what organizations are focusing on (uptime):

More than 90% of data center and IT professionals surveyed said they believe their corporate management is more concerned about outages now than they were a year ago. And while 90% of organizations conduct root cause analysis of an IT outage, only 60% said that they measure the cost of downtime as a business metric, the report found.

Demographics: “responses from more than 1,000 data center and IT professionals worldwide.”

Pretty much all Pivotal Cloud Foundry customers run “private cloud.” Many of them want to move to public cloud in a “multi-cloud” (I can’t make myself say “hybrid cloud”) fashion or mostly public cloud over the next 5 to ten years. That’s why we support all the popular public clouds. Most of them are doing plenty of things in public cloud now – though, not anywhere near “a whole lotta” – and there are of course, outliers.

This does bring up a nuanced but important point: I didn’t check out the types of workloads in the survey. I’d suspect that much of the on-premises workloads are packaged software. There’s no doubt plenty of custom written application run on-premises – even the majority of them per my experience with the Pivotal customer base. However, I’d still suspect that more custom written applications were running in the public cloud than other workloads. Just think of all the mobile apps and marketing apps out there.

Also, see some qualitative statements from CIO types.

So, the idea that it’s all public cloud in enterprise IT, thus far, is sort of like, you know: ¯_(ツ)_/¯

38% of enterprises now using DevOps, Gartner

A little survey bit from a recent Gartner report on security in DevOps:

At the time of the original DevOpsSec research in 2012, DevOps was relatively new. However, recent Gartner research indicates that 38% of enterprises are now using DevOps, and 50% will be actively using it by the end of 2016. In the same survey, security and audit tools represented the single highest-rated category of tools in terms of importance to an effective and effcient DevOps implementation, and 82% of respondents indicated that they had to deal with one or more regulations in their DevOps initiatives.

Details of the study from the footnotes:

Gartner Enterprise DevOps Survey Study: This research was conducted via an online survey from 9 May to 13 May 2016 among Gartner Research Circle Members — a Gartner-managed panel composed of IT and business leaders.
Objectives: To learn how organizations are adopting DevOps as a means to accelerate enablement; to go faster while improving quality; additionally, to inform on topics, including starting a DevOps approach, pitfalls to avoid, scaling efforts, integrating information security, pursuing this in a regulated environment and quantifying bene ts.
In all, 252 IT and business leaders participated, with 95 members qualified by indicating they are already using DevOps.

Top container challenges: management, monitoring, storage

I keep wanting to write up the recent Cloud Foundry Foundation container survey, mixing it in with other recent container surveys. Yup, “keep wanting to.” Meanwhile, Abby wrote-up a brief overview over in O’Reilly land.

Source: 3 facts about container adoption you don’t know – O’Reilly Media