Keeping sane at the airport

After 10 years of business travel, this is how I cope at the airport:

  • You’ll get there, even if you’re late.
  • Don’t worry about lines, just wait in them.
  • Few people know what they’re doing here, don’t let their stress stress you out.
  • There are no special snowflakes, unless you have a doctor’s note.
  • The word of airline staff is law, you can’t argue against the agent of the FAA.
  • Relax and walk slow.
  • If you want a better experience, pay more or pay your dues.

When in doubt, and even if it contradicts the above, you can always:

  • Move fast and get out of the way.

AirBnB lowers hotel prices 8-10%, effects low end hotel more


There’s all sorts of fun findings and theories in this study of AirBnB’s effect in the hotel market in Austin and Dallas. The easiest one is that it lowers pricing by 8-10% for the non-business traveler segment:

As Airbnb has its roots in casual stays, including those involving shared accommodations, we expect it to be a more attractive option for travelers on a budget. Conversely, business travelers and vacationers who frequent high-end hotels are two examples of consumers we argue are less likely to substitute a hotel stay with an Airbnb stay.

There’s also some interesting commentary on the very fixed assets of traditional hotel companies verses the agility of AirBnB:
– It’s impossible to rapidly increase the supply of hotel rooms to meet demand: it takes an average of 4 years to build new hotels, so you can’t really meet rising demand even on an annual basis.
– In contrast, the AirBnB supply can expand and contract on a daily basis as people decided to list and delist their rooms and houses.
– Of course, AirBnB demand is cap’ed to the number of fixed houses and apartments in an areas…but companies to hotel rooms, that supply seems infinite. (There’s an interesting analogy to public cloud here.)

Flexibility, short TSA lines, and smooth travel – survey on business travel

Millennials want choice when making a booking, Generation Xers want control over their trip, and Boomers don’t really care about the booking process — they just want a smooth travel experience while staying connected with friends and family.

“Although the major themes are the same for Millennials and Gen Xers, the key variables that make up the themes are different,” the report states. “Millennial business travelers want a variety of suppliers from which you can choose to book and prefer booking travel on a third party website. Meanwhile for Gen Xers, it’s all about the ease of making changes to their travel plans. Gen Xers place a value on the ease of making changes and booking directly on a supplier’s website. Gen Xers value this over having more booking choices. Conversely booking was not an important theme for Boomers.”

Source: What Makes Millennial, Gen X, and Boomer Business Travelers Most Satisfied?

New AAdvantage Flyer Mileage Rewards Rate

AAdvantage Executive Platinum members now will receive 11 miles for every dollar spent. Platinum members will earn eight miles per dollar and gold members will earn seven miles.

The new rewards rate goes into effect on Aug. 1.

They gots to get that paper!

Source: American Airlines Shrinks Its AAdvantage Flyer Mileage Rewards Rate – Fortune

You’re on a trip

If you are traveling by car, there is a good chance it’s a trip. If you have packed one or more “throw-up bags,” clearly, it’s a trip. If you packed a training potty, not a vacation. A trip if ever there was one. If you break into a complete sweat loading the car and/or overhead storage compartment you spent a small fortune on because you thought it was kinda cool, well, that’s a trip. If packing the car leads to a fight with your spouse about who has a better “system”… you, my friend, are going on a trip.

If your final destination is a tent, you are not on a vacation. You are not even on a trip. You are on a camping trip. There will be tears. Mostly yours. Camping, for obvious reasons, gets its own classification. If you have to walk outside to a bathroom and/or shower, you are on a camping trip. If you need coins to get a hot shower, you are soooo not on a vacation… I don’t even know what to tell you.

It’s all good stuff.

Source: “Vacation or Trip? A Helpful Guide for Parents”