Book Review: Automation & tech ethics, book review

These two books go well together because the first describes how automation is lowering the need for labor, leading, likely, to less jobs, while the second provides a compendium of examples of such software-driven labor change.
Vinnie’s book has the optimism of a technologist, while Avent’s is much more fraught. Both accurately describe how IT is optimizing and replacing “analog” labor and businesses, leaving the core problem of devaluing human labor, perhaps to the point of eliminating millions of jobs, permanently. Vinnie’s optimism is the usual believe that we can figure it out, mostly by being more humane in our politics and safety nets, but also in the belief that new problems and jobs will come about. Avent, on the other hand, offers little in the way of solace.
As the review in his magazine, The Economist, put it: “I found the virtuosity with which Mr Avent knocked down possible solutions disquieting.” Aside from actually reading the book, the lecture Avent gave at LSE is good stuff too.
Check out the full review.

Book Review: two DevOps books

Check out my review of the DevOps Handbook and Start and Scaling DevOps in the Enterprise over on The New Stack.

Unsurprisingly, I liked both of them, esp. the second:

What I find so helpful, and even thrilling, about Gruver’s book, is that it’s exacting in its instructions and walks through several what-if scenarios for addressing common problems that come up when applying agile and DevOps at scale. Plus, it’s the perfect size for a book of this type: about 90 pages that’ll take you about 90 minutes to read.

The Requirements of Cloud Native – Interview on The New Stack

A little while ago I was on The New Stack Makers podcast with Alex Williams, talking cloud and Pivotal. Check it out:

Here’s what we go over:

In this podcast with Michael Coté, who works at Pivotal in technical marketing, he and The New Stack founder Alex Williams talk about current production systems and development environments for building applications. According to Coté, Pivotal describes these new systems and environments as “cloud native.”

Over the course of this interview, Coté discusses best practices and illustrates three requirements for cloud native development and deployment: utilizing the patterns of microservices architecture, implementing a DevOps approach, and striving for continuous delivery as the primary vehicle for software delivery.

Check it out!

The platform for keeping promises – a logical architecture for Pivotal Cloud Foundry

Check out my brief (~15 minutes) discussion with Alex Williams at The New Stack about how we’re thinking about the architecture of Pivotal Cloud Foundry. In addition to giving an overview of what Pivotal Cloud Foundry is and the cloud management and PaaS capabilities it has, I go over a way of thinking about the layered architecture (and why you’d care) that Andrew has been talking about recently.

There’s a longer version of this in my recent talk from Gartner ADDI as well.

Composable Cloud At HP

“It’s not a microservice-built application; it’s not moving to a true CI/CD model; but it gets them incrementally on that path, and they start to get some value more short-term from that.”

“That’s where we focus: hit ’em where their problems are today,” he says. “‘Skate to where the puck is going,’ to use the Gretzky saying, but at the same time don’t skate out of the rink. Don’t come at them and say, ‘Hey, we have the microservices platform for you.’ ‘Awesome. What am I going to do with my SAP system?’ Getting that balance right is what we’ve been focused on.”

Bill Hilf on HP’s cloud approach.

https://api.soundcloud.com/tracks/181424307/stream?client_id=3cQaPshpEeLqMsNFAUw1Q?plead=please-dont-download-this-or-our-lawyers-wont-let-us-host-audio

There’s a lot of people who’d like to make a lot of money off of this, so don’t get all shocked when things go weird.

Last week’s thenewstack.io podcast has us discussing open source foundations and their role in the vendor landscape. We talk about the ASF, the Linux Foundation, the Cloud Foundry Foundation, and a theoretic Docker foundation. If you’re into all that scenario thinking, it’s good stuff to start thinking about how things might play out based on the structures and cultures people are putting into place around this part of the IT world. See the full shownotes over on thenewstack.io.

Why Did Docker Catch on Quickly and Why is it so Interesting? | The New Stack

Excellent piece. Too bad my folks didn’t get around to writing it first, but at least now it doesn’t need to be written.

The insights in developer relations are great.

At a meta-level:

It’d be interesting to “crowd source” analyst research agendas by just bundling up pieces like this and original work and having that be your “corpus” of research. It’s what Techmeme does for news (no original content though). That’s kind of what InfoQ does for appdev and I think it works kind of well there (I find video a bit too oblique, but you could do 500-1,000 word summaries a a la Blinkist on all the conference talk videos InfoQ has – that’d be a good premium service). Probably a good business too. I suppose it’s the infamous HuffPo and Forbes model, but applies to IT industry analysis.

Why Did Docker Catch on Quickly and Why is it so Interesting? | The New Stack

I was on The New Stack Analyst podcast today along with Nancy Gohring, one of the tech reports who’s work I’ve always enjoyed, and, of course, Alex Williams.

We discuss Nancy’s recent piece on Azure cloud seeming to grow faster than Amazon’s cloud, the problem with figuring comparisons like this out, some different scenarios for big cloud vendor success and failure based on where the packaged software market goes, and then DaaS and WaaS. The last is a topic I know less about than I’d like, but that never stops a analyst from talking about a topic…at length.

Pretty wide-ranging topics, but all trying to sort through what “IT” is becoming with all this cloud nonsense running around.

My connection was slow so I shut down my video. Enjoy milkman meets pie man.