Go to where the customers are. True story.

By making it easy for people to buy movie tickets online or through a smartphone app, Fandango has experienced breakneck growth over the last two years. A couple of taps and presto! The seats are yours.

And on the “omni-channel,” even cyberspace has lots of omni:

“Consumers, particularly young ones, find it inconvenient to hop into different silos to get something done,” she said. “They want it all in one place. That sounds obnoxious, I know — the definition of a ‘first-world problem’ — but it’s true, and Fandango is solving it for them.”

Source:
Buy Movie Tickets on Facebook? Fandango Makes It Possible

Flexibility, short TSA lines, and smooth travel – survey on business travel

Millennials want choice when making a booking, Generation Xers want control over their trip, and Boomers don’t really care about the booking process — they just want a smooth travel experience while staying connected with friends and family.

“Although the major themes are the same for Millennials and Gen Xers, the key variables that make up the themes are different,” the report states. “Millennial business travelers want a variety of suppliers from which you can choose to book and prefer booking travel on a third party website. Meanwhile for Gen Xers, it’s all about the ease of making changes to their travel plans. Gen Xers place a value on the ease of making changes and booking directly on a supplier’s website. Gen Xers value this over having more booking choices. Conversely booking was not an important theme for Boomers.”

Source: What Makes Millennial, Gen X, and Boomer Business Travelers Most Satisfied?

Would you buy auto insurance from Google? The Kids and auto insurance

The young people account for 20% of of the $180bn US auto insurance market. Here’s some trends in their buying behavior a la a BCG infographic:

Infographic on car insurance buying habits.

Some items:

  • That nearly 40% are willing to buy from Amazon, Google, and others should put traditional insurance vendors in full on freak out mode.
  • Once The Kids start the long (up to two weeks!) research process, they’re 70% more likely to switch than The Olds. So, it’s probably a good idea for incumbents to heavily get involved in research, pointing to native content sponsored “third parties” and providing their own research.
  • As one of our Pivotal customers, Allstate, put it: “Everybody is going to disrupt the insurance industry. It hasn’t been disrupted in eighty-plus years.”

Source: bcg.perspectives – How Digital Switchers Are Disrupting US Auto Insurers

I’m always wary of discounting Office: the closer you are to the corporate world, the more you appreciate its reach, but on the flip side, the further away I get from that world the more I appreciate how much of Office’s importance is based on habit rather than need.

Ben Thompson in his April 30th, 2015 newsletter.

Flexibility over more money

It looks like that whole “work/life balance” thing is freakin’ people out:

This is the first generation in the history of America that hasn’t said it wants a better life than its parents. It wants more flexibility. It’s going to be a different sets of things and fundamentally people who are less loyal. This is really bad news.

I’m sure they’re all “next stop: OMG! Grexit!”

Flexibility over more money

A few weeks ago, I gave one of my occasional lectures at the University of Sydney, a class on the history of virtual reality and art. (Postmodern theories about disembodiment and self-representation from the 90s have found a new lease on life, thanks to Oculus and Google Cardboard.)

Why it matters long term? As an academic says:

“There is a very strong track record of places that attract talent becoming places of long-term success,” said Edward Glaeser, an economist at Harvard and author of Triumph of the City. “The most successful economic development policy is to attract and retain smart people and then get out of their way.”