Link: What I Learned on Medieval Twitter

Dorothy Kim has argued that Twitter activity, especially during conferences, enables scholars to amplify critical insights that would normally be relegated to the margins, circulating commentary as variously exegetical, irreverent, and dissident as the marginalia in medieval manuscripts: “Twitter can be radically serious in pushing against the ‘authority and control’ of the state, the scholarly-industrial complex, and institutional power. It can also be playful, hysterically funny, irreverent, cute: an utter delight though often also still radically pushing against the ‘authority and control’ of the powers-that-be.”

Source: What I Learned on Medieval Twitter

Link: Exclusive poll: America sours on social media giants

About 40% of Americans still feel that social media is a net positive for society. Overall, 65% of people say smartphones have made their quality of life better.

And people are concerned about misinformation in THE SOCIAL.
Original source: Exclusive poll: America sours on social media giants

Link: GDPR Seen Slowing AI Innovation

Given all the Facebook stuff, I think less balancing towards the side of the robots would probably probably be good:

‘A recent study advocating a U.S. strategy for developing machine intelligence also noted the potential barriers to development that include GDPR and other data privacy efforts. The study released by the Center for Strategic and International Studies warned that the shift to “data localization” will require “balancing legitimate concerns around privacy and consumer protection both in the United States and abroad with the need for an open, flexible data ecosystem that supports innovation and experimentation in AI.”’
Original source: GDPR Seen Slowing AI Innovation

Link: There is no “technology industry”

‘But today, the major players in what’s called the “tech industry” are enormous conglomerates that regularly encompass everything from semiconductor factories to high-end retail stores to Hollywood-style production studios. The upstarts of the business can work on anything from cleaning your laundry to creating drones. There’s no way to put all these different kinds of products and services into any one coherent bucket now that they encompass the entire world of business.’
Original source: There is no “technology industry”

Link: Media vs. Facebook: This time it’s personal

“Facebook and Google execs privately complain about the barrage of critical coverage they face, charging that media companies have a financial incentive to attack them and that media execs are settling scores. They’re right.”
Original source: Media vs. Facebook: This time it’s personal

Link: ‘Big Tech’ isn’t one big monopoly – it’s 5 companies all in different businesses

‘But despite simple perception of them all as “tech” companies, their core revenue sources are clearly different. And those distinctions suggest ways people can understand and respond to anxieties about their growing economic and cultural influence.’
Original source: ‘Big Tech’ isn’t one big monopoly – it’s 5 companies all in different businesses

Link: Mayor of London Calls for Regulation of the Tech Industry

“Tech companies, innovators, must take responsibilities for how their platforms are used, Khan said. He also called on politicians and policymakers to look out for the public and pass regulation when necessary.”
Original source: Mayor of London Calls for Regulation of the Tech Industry

Link: Web inventor wants regulation of web

“What’s more, the fact that power is concentrated among so few companies has made it possible to weaponise the web at scale. In recent years, we’ve seen conspiracy theories trend on social media platforms, fake Twitter and Facebook accounts stoke social tensions, external actors interfere in elections, and criminals steal troves of personal data. We’ve looked to the platforms themselves for answers. Companies are aware of the problems and are making efforts to fix them — with each change they make affecting millions of people. The responsibility — and sometimes burden — of making these decisions falls on companies that have been built to maximise profit more than to maximise social good. A legal or regulatory framework that accounts for social objectives may help ease those tensions.”
Original source: Web inventor wants regulation of web

Link: Why are antiques now so cheap?

‘eBay and the internet have increased supply more than demand. It is much easier to sell an estate, or the contents of your attic, than before. But the upward potential for demand in the market isn’t nearly as significant. Some people say “well, I would in fact buy and collect antiques if I could get the right 18th century pieces at 40% their current values,” but many more people just aren’t interested at all.’

The Internet destroying yet another market by connecting people across geographies. Perhaps it was false value in the first place.
Original source: Why are antiques now so cheap?

Link: Why are antiques now so cheap?

‘eBay and the internet have increased supply more than demand. It is much easier to sell an estate, or the contents of your attic, than before. But the upward potential for demand in the market isn’t nearly as significant. Some people say “well, I would in fact buy and collect antiques if I could get the right 18th century pieces at 40% their current values,” but many more people just aren’t interested at all.’

The Internet destroying yet another market by connecting people across geographies. Perhaps it was false value in the first place.
Original source: Why are antiques now so cheap?

Link: Will open source software become a ‘tragedy of the commons’?

I love this concept of tragedy of the anti-commons: “Strong management can stop this overuse. But because contributors haven’t been able to derive value through a platform built just for them, they must look for other ways to gain value, perhaps through the addition of intellectual property. And this leads us into the tragedy of the anti-commons. We have seen cases where a fork of an open source software project or even just the threat of a fork can act as disincentive to steering or influencing for a particular group or provider’s benefit, but this presents other challenges to the code moving forward.”
Original source: Will open source software become a ‘tragedy of the commons’?

Link: Driving Diversity Change In a “Problematic” World

“If you’ve ever had to plan a long project — getting to the end state can seem so difficult and impossible. The work that takes to get there is painful and fraught with peril and compromises. We think the path to success looks like a nice, neat flowchart. We think change comes from the top down, or the bottom up, when in reality it’s a bunch of arrows coming from a variety of crazy directions, with missteps and everything in-between.”
Original source: Driving Diversity Change In a “Problematic” World

Link: Ethics? Yeah, that’s great, but do they scale?

“We’re not hand-crafting dovetail joints here. To be ethical engineers in a hyperscale world we need to reason critically about what we build, on a feature-by-feature basis, and stand by our reasoning if it is sound.”
Original source: Ethics? Yeah, that’s great, but do they scale?

Link: Technology that we don’t realize we’re thankful for

‘To start with, there are the infrastructural systems that fill out the bottom of Maslow’s pyramid of needs: clean water on tap, the ability to flush away disease-causing waste, natural gas for warmth and food preparation, and raw energy in the form of electricity, for heat and light, to replace physical labor, and to power cooling and electronics. Moving up Maslow’s pyramid, these systems underpin communication, community and self-actualization: connections to the rest of the world in the form of telecommunications and postal mail, physical links in the form of roads and a subway that link to rail, airports, and more.’
Original source: Technology that we don’t realize we’re thankful for

Link: Why Software Developers Should Take Ethics Into Consideration

“[Developers are ]not asking themselves, what are the ethical consequences of this? Who could get hurt by this? Who does this enable over another person? Who does this disadvantage or advantage? They’re not asking those questions. My goal is to have that part of the natural sequence of developing software.”
Original source: Why Software Developers Should Take Ethics Into Consideration

Link: Info Commissioner tears into Google’s ‘call us journalists’ trial defence

‘This argument enraged the ICO, which said in the submission: “The concept of ‘journalism’ presupposes a process by which content is published to an audience pursuant to the taking of human editorial decisions as to the substantive nature and extent of that content.”… In plain English, humans (mostly) don’t decide what appears in search results so calling Google’s activities “journalism” is just plain wrong, according to the commissioner.’
Original source: Info Commissioner tears into Google’s ‘call us journalists’ trial defence