Pivotal Conversations: Cloud-native monitoring & PCF Metrics, with Todd Persen

This week’s podcast:

In this episode we talk with Todd Persen on the topic of monitoring cloud-native applications with Pivotal Cloud Foundry Metric. We discuss the changing nature of monitoring in cloud-native platforms, how developers can now turn black-boxes into white-boxes, why time-series dominates the thought-technology in this space now, and the benefits of open source taking over most innovation in systems management. Richard is out this week, so Andrew Shafer returns to fill in as co-host.

Listen above, download the MP3 directly, and/or subscribe to the podcast feed if you haven’t.

At $3.7bn, AppDynamics sells to Cisco at 17.3x, estimated

Based on the S-1 filings from the business, a $3.7B price implies a 17.3x enterprise value/trailing twelve month revenue multiple, which is 41% higher than the next nearest acquisition, Salesforce/Demandware. There’s no comparable pricing event in the M&A market in the last 10 years.

And, from Simon at The Register:

The Borg’s plucked the company mere days before it was expected to float on the stock market, an event expected to raise around US$1.4bn for a portion of the company.

While AppDynamics could point to over 2,000 customers and nine-figure revenues, it also had rather a lot of red ink to deal with. That’s Cisco’s problem now, as it will make AppDynamics a software business unit in its internet of things and applications business.

Source: The Biggest M&A Multiple in Software History

More on working on DevOps products

Back at DevOpsDays Austin last week, John and I sat down for a (now-a-days) rare recording. He was interested in talking about the presentation I’d given the day before on lessons learned form working on a DevOps product, Crowbar, at Dell.


(Source: http://bit.ly/IEm0d1)

How a BigCo actually got some innovation done – The Longer Story of Crowbar

Here’s the slides for the talk I gave this morning (at DevOpsDays Austin 2012) on lessons learned from working on a DevOps product in a large company, that is, Crowbar in Dell.

You can also see the recording of the presentation if you scrub the start time to around 17:45:00 in this recording.

The abstract:

Sometimes it seems like It’s near impossible to get anything innovative, interesting done in a large company – it’s as if BigCos are goaled to prevent just that. While you can’t type a URL without hearing how a Ramen-fueled startup got ground breaking product out the door, you rarely hear about how the other side of the exit lives in Large Company Land. This talk will use the story of Crowbar at Dell to grope out how to get good things done in big technology companies, esp. when it comes to something as BigCo esoteric as DevOps!

I’m amazed when I find a skunk-worked project that’s blossomed into a valuable, strategic asset for a company. In the case of Dell and Crowbar, it’s even more astonishing: Dell has traditionally been a stone-cold hardware company focused on shipping more boxes each quarter, Crowbar is an open source piece of software whose business model depends on the nuanced dynamics of open platforms strategy. You’d never think these two things would go together. And yet, Crowbar exists and has had amazing success (both externally and internally) in an extremely short time. With the access I have to the “real story,” being at Dell now after six years at RedMonk covering tech from the outside, I’ll go over lessons learned on getting DevOps and a DevOps product through the Brazil-like pneumatic tubes of a $62.1B company.


(Source: http://bit.ly/HQ2xRr)