The problem with the “DevOps tools” category, and the RightScale Cloud Survey

There’s always some good year/year stuff in this survey. I’ll have to check it out soon.

Meanwhile, some coverage from Serdar Yegulalp:

“DevOps tools”:

This category is going to be increasingly weird to cover. Here, what they really mean are “containers and container orchestration tools…oh, and configuration management tools.”

Arguably, you’d put something like Cloud Foundry in there if you have a gumbo of three different software categories, each used by people who want to follow DevOps practices and get the benefits of improving software. We haven’t put public numbers recently, but back in September of 2015 Pivotal Cloud Foundry had $100m in annual bookings, and the growth has continued.

Here’s how 451 characterized our customer base and foot-print out there:

While Pivotal Labs’ early success was among startups, PCF was designed for organizations needing to increase velocity and change their application delivery process, which appeals to large enterprises. About 90% of Pivotal’s revenue comes from enterprise customers today. The company reports that its number of paying customers is in the hundreds, with average deal sizes in the high six-figure range. It also says most of its customers are using PCF on top of VMware’s IaaS offering. AWS is currently in second place among PCF deployments with Azure as a close third that is gaining momentum among the Fortune 100.

All of that means: Pivotal Cloud Foundry has many customers running in production (with the resulting revenue) and, I’d argue, much market share. If you throw in IBM and MicroFocus/HPE’s Cloud Foundry distro revenue, plus OSS use (like at 18F), you’ve got a large chunk of Cloud Foundry usage out there, which should translate into a large chunk of “doing software better (with DevOps)” marketshare for all of Cloud Foundry.

¯\_(ツ)_/¯

Like I said, coverage will be weird for awhile as people sort it out. Kind of like “cloud” was in 2009, and pretty much every “PaaS” category now, though it’s getting better. I’m looking forward to what they sort out in the new(ish?) DevOps practice at IDC.

More coverage of the survey:

Private, public, hybrid:

One key trend RightScale’s tracked over 2014, 2015, and 2016 has been the use of private cloud through OpenStack, VMware, and related products. This time around, while private cloud adoption hasn’t fallen off a cliff, it’s edged down: 72 percent of respondents this year run a private cloud, versus 77 percent last year and 63 percent the prior year. Hybrid cloud has shown a similar trajectory of 67 percent in 2017, 71 percent in 2016, and 58 percent in 2015.

After margin of error, pretty slow, but a good enough pace I guess.

Make no mistake: AWS is cloud king, and it’ll safely remain that way for a long time. But Microsoft Azure has made remarkable amount of progress in the last year. In 2016, only 20 percent of respondents were running apps there; this year, it’s 34 percent. With enterprise users specifically, the growth was even more dramatic, from 26 percent to 43 percent.

And, Oracle and DigitalOcean:

Azure’s growth isn’t coming at the expense of business from other cloud providers. Oracle Cloud and DigitalOcean, the two decliners on the list, didn’t have enough business to lose in the first place to constitute Azure’s jump: respectively, 4 and 5 percent in 2016, and 3 and 2 percent this year.

Now, of course all this hinges on what exactly they mean by cloud, what the sample base is (just RightScale customers?), etc. But, anything that’s multi-year is useful.

See also Barb’s brief coverage, e.g.: “Azure, meanwhile, saw a bigger jump with 43% of respondents on Azure now, compared to 26% last year.”

Source: Docker’s tops for devops, AWS is the cloud king, InfoWorld

People (say they) will spend more on clothes that actually fit

It’s a sore point for many shoppers, who are ready and eager to spend more on designer clothes if only they were available: 78% of respondents in a recent survey of plus-size shoppers said that they’d be willing to spend more money if designers offered more options, and 80% said they’d likely purchase an item from their favorite designer if that designer made plus sizes.

File under “if anything, more money. Plus, bonus: morals!”:

More and more designers and retailers seem to be waking up to that fact. The market for plus-size women’s clothing is over $20 billion, by some measures

Link

White men to women and minorities in tech: We just DGAF

Less than 5% of white men surveyed said they considered a lack of diversity a top problem. Three-out-of-four respondents were unaware of any initiatives to make their companies or portfolios more diverse. And 40% of male respondents were sick of the media going on and on about it.

Meanwhile, in political land:

the more privileged you are, the less that oppression personally affects you, the less urgency you perhaps have to get involved in the fight.

And:

According to Shireen Mitchell, activist and founder of Digitalsista, much of the reason women of color are so often on the front lines is because it’s work that needs to be done, and they don’t see anyone else stepping up. “Women of color are always taught to build community to get things done, and in my opinion, most white men are taught that they can only succeed if they are the ‘savior’ for the community. With this mindset, they know they can’t really do that job when it comes to inclusivity because of their inherent bias.”

As those stats on hiring above show, there’s plenty of room for white men to try new ideas out, e.g.:

That leads to white people, especially white men, waiting to act until they feel they will be acknowledged and congratulated for their work. “What we need is for them to take initiative, grow from being uncomfortable and making mistakes. Use their privilege to elevate those who are taking the lead and not add to taxing or using their labor,” says Mitchell.

Link

Cloud strategies plodding along

From a 451 report on outsourcing in cloud-land:

From our Voice of the Enterprise research, we can see that about two-thirds of organizations are operating with moderate transformation, while a fifth describe themselves as undertaking significant transformation.

And what do these new projects look like?

In the manufacturing sector and in transaction-heavy back-office process areas, automation continues to improve the top line for businesses. In banking, financial services and insurance, the main challenge is how to manage compliance cost-effectively so that productivity is not impacted.

Source: “The curious case of cloud services and the demise of multi-sourcing.”

451: Mesosphere momentum, container usage

From Jay Lyman:

Mesosphere says it is adding enterprise customers and building up deal sizes. The company has also grown its number of employees to 200, up from 150 in March. Mesosphere declined to comment, but 451 Research estimates its annual revenue is in the $25m range.”

And, from a recent survey on container usage:

Our Voice of the Enterprise (VotE) Software-Defined Infrastructure, Workloads and Key Projects survey, conducted in April and May, indicates that out of 718 enterprise IT decision-makers polled 23.7% have implemented containers. By comparison, 25.1% have implemented Software-Defined Networking, 26.7% have implemented Software-Defined Storage and 92.9% have implemented server virtualization.

Source: Mesosphere rises where containers and big data come together in the enterprise

Creativity: not much needed at your job

Capabilities such as creativity and sensing emotions are core to the human experience and also difficult to automate. The amount of time that workers spend on activities requiring these capabilities, though, appears to be surprisingly low. Just 4 percent of the work activities across the US economy require creativity at a median human level of performance. Similarly, only 29 percent of work activities require a median human level of performance in sensing emotion.

Four fundamentals of workplace automation

It’s Not the Economy, Stupid

Rational anaysis is hard to find in real life:

But in Elkhart, people have jobs they didn’t have six years ago, and they’re working more hours. Their homes are worth more than they were before Obama took office, on average, and their paychecks are fatter than they used to be. Yet Obama is, and will likely remain, the president who didn’t do anything right.

Link

2% increase in IT budgets predicted

The big takeaway is that small increases in IT budgets are the new normal. Unlike previous recoveries, we have not seen a large jump in IT spending over the past five years. So if a CIO is only seeing a two or three percent increase this year, he or she should understand that is pretty much in line with other companies.

See more guidance charts on IT priorities, n=190.

Link

Developer Relations: More than Traveling the World and Buying People Beer

Some tactical advice, with some small survey figures:

It was a small survey of 79 people, which isn’t particularly surprising since there aren’t that many developer relations roles. Some of the top skills needed to be successful in developer relations include communication, technical, and empathy. They also travel to a lot of events, 50 percent attend more than 15 events per year and 55 percent of them plan to attend even more next year.

Events, direct one-to-one communications, content marketing, and social media are seen as the most effective channels for developer outreach. Developer relations is a fairly new field. Almost 50 percent of developer relations programs where these people work are 2-4 years old and just over 25 percent were less than a year old, which is similar to the experience of developer relations professionals with just under 45 percent of them in the field for 2-4 years. There are also a lot of lone wolves with 30 percent of people surveyed being the only person in their company doing developer relations, and just over 30 percent have teams of 2-5 people.

Link

On-prem still a big thing, Gartner survey

only 10% of organizations surveyed by Gartner are expected to close their on-premises data centers by 2018

Much of Pivotal’s business is on-premises, very much if it. However, most large organizations I talk with really want to get to much more public cloud as soon as possible. They look to Pivotal Cloud Foundry’s multi-cloud compatibility to help them down the line with that. For example, Home Depot is starting to move applications to Google Cloud.

Anyhow, most people outside of enterprise IY are surprised and a bit incredulous at how much “private cloud” there still is: ¯_(ツ)_/¯

Link