[Link] Not being there: on prophylactic media and remoteness

In promising to eliminate distance, virtuality also promised to erase the difference between presence and absence. We would always be there, wherever “there” happened to be. That seemed plausible when our virtual selves were engaged in the traditional pursuits of media — news and entertainment, play and performance, information production and information gathering — but it was revealed to be an illusion as soon as social media became our means of living. Being remote is a drag. The state of absence, a physical state but also a psychic one, is a state of loneliness and frustration, angst and ennui.

Also:

The architecture of Zoom is the architecture of the panopticon.

And, then, kind of a sudden turn at the end of the piece.

Original source: Not being there: on prophylactic media and remoteness

Link: New Common Sense Media survey finds more positives than negatives in teen use of social media

‘“Overall, Common Sense said teens are more likely to view social media as a good thing in their emotional lives. For example, 16 percent said using social media makes them feel less depressed and 25 percent said they feel less lonely, compared to 3 percent who said social media use made them feel more depressed or lonely. The report states that even though teen social media use has skyrocketed in six years, “teens are no more likely to report having a negative reaction to social media on any of these (emotional well-being) measures today than they were in 2012.”’
Original source: New Common Sense Media survey finds more positives than negatives in teen use of social media

Link: Mayor of London Calls for Regulation of the Tech Industry

“Tech companies, innovators, must take responsibilities for how their platforms are used, Khan said. He also called on politicians and policymakers to look out for the public and pass regulation when necessary.”
Original source: Mayor of London Calls for Regulation of the Tech Industry

Link: Web inventor wants regulation of web

“What’s more, the fact that power is concentrated among so few companies has made it possible to weaponise the web at scale. In recent years, we’ve seen conspiracy theories trend on social media platforms, fake Twitter and Facebook accounts stoke social tensions, external actors interfere in elections, and criminals steal troves of personal data. We’ve looked to the platforms themselves for answers. Companies are aware of the problems and are making efforts to fix them — with each change they make affecting millions of people. The responsibility — and sometimes burden — of making these decisions falls on companies that have been built to maximise profit more than to maximise social good. A legal or regulatory framework that accounts for social objectives may help ease those tensions.”
Original source: Web inventor wants regulation of web

The destruction of a narrow medium

Ben sums up his take on how “the media” was melted down:

…the destruction of journalism is about the destruction of journalism’s business model, which was predicated on scarcity. In the case of newspapers, printing presses, delivery trucks, and a healthy subscriber base made them the lowest common denominator when it came to advertising, right down to four line classified ads that represented some of the most expensive copy on a per-letter basis in the world.

Source: A Technical Glitch – Stratechery by Ben Thompson

Tips on using social media from analyzing how celebrities manage their brands

Some highlights from the article that seem to apply to any marketing use of social media:

  • “If staying on message is the first rule of corporate communications, it is also the cardinal sin of social media.”
  • Each medium has it’s own format and expectations: “corporations can and should differentiate their approach to each platform, digital-marketing experts say.”
  • “Instagram is stylish, behind the scenes” – well, for most of us, “stylish” won’t apply. But the “behind the scenes” part is interesting.
  • “Validate your followers with likes, comments and retweets. It builds goodwill.”
  • Frequent factotumia – “It’s about showing up every single day and showing pieces of their lives rather than when they have a premiere or something to promote.”
  • “Instead of trying to get followers to buy their product, companies can gently boost their brand by commenting on current events.”

Source: What Celebrities Can Teach Companies About Social Media