Link: Meet Kate Garman, Seattle’s smart cities coordinator, tasked with making the city more efficient

Examples of what a city would do with IoT:

“The private sector has pushed cities in a lot of ways,” she said. “My favorite example is, because Uber and Lyft and other transportation network companies could show you where your ride is on your phone, people started really asking, ‘Well, where’s my snow plow? Where are my services?’ It opened people’s minds to expecting more from the public sector, which is a healthy thing so long as the public sector has enough capacity for it.”
Original source: Meet Kate Garman, Seattle’s smart cities coordinator, tasked with making the city more efficient

Link: Meet Kate Garman, Seattle’s smart cities coordinator, tasked with making the city more efficient

Examples of what a city would do with IoT:

“The private sector has pushed cities in a lot of ways,” she said. “My favorite example is, because Uber and Lyft and other transportation network companies could show you where your ride is on your phone, people started really asking, ‘Well, where’s my snow plow? Where are my services?’ It opened people’s minds to expecting more from the public sector, which is a healthy thing so long as the public sector has enough capacity for it.”
Original source: Meet Kate Garman, Seattle’s smart cities coordinator, tasked with making the city more efficient

Link: Amazon HQ2 blamed for high real-estate, rent, and traffic in Seattle

‘High demand and low inventory creates bidding wars and animosity among those who can’t even afford a starter home in the city they grew up in,” Kurt Schlosser wrote in September for GeekWire. “And the rent is too damn high, too. Workers who don’t wear tech badges for a living are forced to look outside the city and thus contend with the traffic coming in and out of it, creating a vicious cycle and affordability crisis.”’

Meanwhile: “The retailer says its Seattle headquarters has created 53,000 jobs in the city in addition to pumping a staggering $38 billion into the local economy.”
Original source: Amazon HQ2 blamed for high real-estate, rent, and traffic in Seattle

Link: Seattle’s complaints about Amazon HQ1

People say Amazon isn’t good for Seattle, here’s a summary of the issues: ‘Housing prices in Seattle are rising faster than anywhere else in the nation. According to Business Insider, from 2005 to 2015, Seattle’s median rent jumped from $1,008 to $1,286, an increase nearly three times the national median, while the city’s median home price skyrocketed 17 percent in the last year, reaching $730,000. Amazon has snatched up more new office space downtown than every other company in the city combined, “helping Seattle become the crane capital of America and a near-constant construction site,” writes the Seattle Times. In September, Times columnist Danny Westneat warned potential HQ2 cities of a “prosperity bomb” that would wipe out mom-and-pop shops and old diners and replace them with “the new and sterile,” plus an invading army of “bros” as a result of Amazon’s mostly male workforce.’
Original source: Seattle’s complaints about Amazon HQ1