Red Hat updates RHEL 7 for cloud with containers, Windows support and improvements (451 Report)

My colleague Jay Lyman and I wrote up Red Hat’s recent OS release, RHEL 7. Of interest to us, of course, is the work Red Hat is doing with containers. Clients can read the full report, and here’s the 451 Take:

In order to differentiate and draw enterprise interest for RHEL 7, Red Hat is wise to look to new technologies, such as containerization, and make them enterprise-ready. The company will need to find new sources of growth beyond Unix conversion and Windows defection, so its effort to link to other technologies and products – cloud computing, RHEV, OpenStack, OpenShift and devops – will be critical. Growth, we feel, lies in becoming the home for new workloads, and features in RHEL 7 like stripped-down, container-ready Atomic are targeting this opportunity.

If you’re not a client already, apply for a trial to check it out and put my name in as a reference.

Red Hat updates RHEL 7 for cloud with containers, Windows support and improvements (451 Report)

What workloads are you running on Red Hat Enterprise Linux?

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I came across this TechValidate stuff in a briefing today. It’s fun!

What workloads are you running on Red Hat Enterprise Linux?

Red Hat jumps on all the right cloud bandwagons, focusing on new application trends (451 Report)

Red Hat Summit Keynote

My overview of the Red Hat Summit is up now, for clients only of course. Here’s the 451 Take:

Like many infrastructure companies, Red Hat used its recent annual summit to point out the importance of developers as the driver for the next wave of IT spending: namely, developers writing new software on top of cloud platforms, often using devops-like practices. We, of course, think paying attention to this space is wise as companies seek to become digital enterprises, using custom applications and cloud-based IT to instrument and boost their business processes. It’s tempting to suggest a headline like “we’re working on it” to sum up many of the announcements at Red Hat Summit. However, because it runs its product management primarily in an open source fashion, Red Hat announcements are often about starting projects (with calls for community participation), not just the final, fully productized 1.0 version of the product when it’s released.

Read the full report at 451, ore apply for a trial if you’re not already a client.

I thought it was a good show with some nice announcements. As the title suggests, I think Red Hat is picking up on the right trends (that is, new technologies and practices that to incorporate into their product suite that will help their customers).

As I noted (well, quoted from another story) in my post on the Summit last week, Red Hat gets about 80% of it’s $1.3bn in revenue from RHEL subscriptions. Over the coming years, the company will need to diversify even more, of course. Like SUSE, they’re looking towards enterprise storage (they bought Gluster, for example) which is a whole new business unit with, possibly, significant revenue, for both companies.

Red Hat jumps on all the right cloud bandwagons, focusing on new application trends (451 Report)