#log 2021-04-28

Creative

“76% of employees employed by high-growth firms agree that their job requires them to be creative,” from “Creativity Catalyzes A Growth Mindset,” Forrester, April 2021.

New talk on metrics

I’m giving a new talk for the first time on May 10th, “Beyond DevOps metrics – technical, business, and culture metrics for the software defined business.” I’ll pull a lot from my upcoming Mindset book, and these Tanzu Talk videos.

One of the better, odder pieces of PowerPoint clipart I’ve seen today

Mindset book

My new booklet is almost done getting all put together. You can still see a draft of it, or wait until next month when it officially comes out.

Modernizing apps, etc.


Modernization white paper: “Tackle Application Modernization in Days and Weeks, Not Months and Years.” It’s a good overview of the disciplined process VMware Tanzu customers go through to modernize their portfolio. It takes years, lots of planning. What I like is that it has a generic, quick process for doing analysis (over and over as you finish each, say, quarter) and focuses a lot of process, not just technology/replatforming. As ever with us, getting CI/CD (“path to production”) a quick and automated as possible is the first, kind of most important step.

No commitment thinking

From “On Bullshit”:

The characteristic topics of a bull session have to do with very personal and emotion-laden aspects of life — for instance, religion, politics, or sex. People are generally reluctant to speak altogether openly about these topics if they expect that they might be taken too seriously. What tends to go on in a bull session is that the participants try out various thoughts and attitudes in order to see how it feels to hear themselves saying such things and in order to discover how others respond, without it being assumed that they are committed to what they say: It is understood by everyone in a bull session that the statements people make do not necessarily reveal what they really believe or how they really feel.

And:

The fact about himself that the bullshitter hides, on the other hand, is that the truth-values of his statements are of no central interest to him; what we are not to understand is that his intention is neither to report the truth nor co conceal it…. His eye is not on the facts at all, as the eyes of the honest man and of the liar are, except insofar as they may be pertinent to his interest in getting away with what he says. He does not care whether the things he says describe reality correctly. He just picks them out, or makes them up, to suit his purpose.

healthcare tech reports notes

Some reading I did for getting up to speed on healthcare tech.

“Claims 2030: A talent strategy for the future of insurance claims”

Claims 2030: A talent strategy for the future of insurance claims

  • Using the old AI agent sidekick idea to take care of decision making. You still have a human face to walk you through stuff. Other roles are a person to sort out more complex things that a computer can’t do and the data scientists who monitor decision making and do new ML-stuff training.

“The productivity imperative for US life and annuities carriers,” McKinsey March, 2021

Productivity is imperative for US life and annuities carriers | McKinsey

  • Life insurance companies have been looking for growth for a long time.
  • Cost cutting is a big priority: “In a proprietary McKinsey survey conducted before the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic, senior life-insurance executives estimated the industry needed to reduce its costs by 35 percent in the medium term, far higher than the typical 10 to 15 percent reductions realized in most cost-cutting programs.”

“How insurers can act on the opportunity of digital ecosystems,” interview with Markus Warg, McKinsey

The opportunity of digital ecosystems for insurance | McKinsey

  • Insurance providers looking for new revenue streams, also new ways to optimize/save money, inc. lesser payouts.
  • This guy is all about engaging with the “ecosystem” or partners and other people to layer on new features to health insurance. HealthKit on the Apple Watch is an interesting aspect. Why don’t more insurers do that?
  • Offering new features to improve the business: “Take, for instance, health insurance. Health insurance’s value is in covering financial risks. However, this product can be enhanced substantially through further services related to telemedicine or health management—resulting in better prevention and reduced costs through more appropriate care settings. This benefits both the customer and the insurer. Similarly, innovations such as digital care assistants prove that traditionally lengthy processes can be completed via an app in just a few minutes. At the same time, such services help to create touchpoints with caregivers along the way.”
  • Some pushing to getting faster develop lifecycles.

“The Time For Strategic EHR Workflow Is Now,” Forrester, July 2019

  • Electronic Health Records (EHR) are not delivering on the promise of optimizing. Doctors don’t like them, they spend too much time in them. The UIs haven’t improved that much: ‘Providers now spend approximately 2 hours in
    the eHr for every hour spent engaged in patient-facing activities.4 in addition, providers report spending an added 1 to 2 hours of “pajama time” catching up on work each night after hours.’

2019 priorities: