Finding talent in tech

My column this month in The Register looks at “the skills gap” most hiring managers see when it comes to tech skill. The suggestions for fixing it are, of course, to fix the framing, expectations, and profile of people you’re looking for. As Andrew Clay Shafer put it: there is no talent shortage.

Source: “You can’t find tech staff – wah, wah, wah. Start with your ridiculous job spec”

The eternal battle for OpenStack’s soul will conclude in three years. Again – My May Register column

“What types of clouds are running OpenStack?” OpenStack Survey, 2017.

My column at The Register this month looks at the state of OpenStack. As Matt Asay better headlined it “CIOs may not want to build private clouds, but they are, anyway.”

Check out the piece!

Scaling DevOps in large organizations – My April Register column

apololypse_now_smell_of_napalm_in_the_morning

My The Register column this month is on scaling DevOps/cloud-native teams to the entire organization. It’s easy to build one team that does software in a new and exciting way, but how can you move to two teams, five teams, and then 100’s? It goes over the amalgamation of a few case studies and plenty of over-the-top gonzo analogies, per usual.

Check it out, and check out past ones if you’re curious for more.

The state of Java – My Feburary Register Column

This month, my column at The Register is on the state of Java and the evolving nature of J(2)EE:

Despite all the inside-bickering, lawsuits, a shotgun wedding to Oracle, drawn-out releases, and rivals from PHP, to Rails, to Swift, Java is still in wide use and shows no signs of finally dying. Jobs-wise, you’d be hard-pressed to find a better language than Java as your primary programming language if you wanted to switch from dropping off hot-pies to writing code.

Check out the rest!

Source: Java? Nah, I do JavaScript, man. Wise up, hipster, to the money • The Register

WTF is “digital transformation”? Beyond AI and VR for practical, software-driven innovation – My January Register Column

At the top of the year, companies are setting their IT agendas. Most high level executives seem to be lusting for “digital transformation,” but that phrase is super-squishy. In my Register column this month, I offered my advice on what it should be: simply “digitizing” existing, manual work-flows by perfecting how you do software.

This, of course, is the core of what I work on at Pivotal; see my wunderkammer of knowledge, the soon to be PDF’ed “Crafting your cloud native strategy,” for example.

What do these opportunities look like in businesses? Here’s a chunk that cut out of the piece that provides some examples:

A project to “digitize” the green card replacement program in the US provides a good example of the simple, pragmatic work IT departments should be curating for 2017. Before injecting software into process it’d “cost about $400 per application, it took end user fees, it took about six months, and by the end, your paper application had traveled the globe no less than six times. Literally traveled the globe as we mailed the physical papers from processing center to processing center.”

After discovering agile and cleaning up the absurd government contracting scoping (a seven year project costing $1.2bn, before accounting for the inevitable schedule and budget overruns), a team of five people successfully tackled this paper-driven, human process. It’s easy to poke fun at government institutions, but if you’ve applied for a mortgage, life insurance, or even tried to order take out food from the corner burger-hut, you’ll have encountered plenty of human-driven processes that could easily be automated with software.

After talking with numerous large organizations about their IT challenges, to me, this kind of example is what “digital transformation” should mostly about, not introducing brain-exploding, Minority Report style innovation. And why not? McKinsey recently estimated that, at best, only 29% of a worker’s day-to-day requires creativity. Much of that remaining 71% is likely just paid-for monotony that could be automated with some good software slotted into place.

That last figure is handy for thinking about the opportunity. You can call it “automation” and freak out about job stealing, but it looks like a huge percentage of work can be “digitized.”

Check out the full piece.

New DevOps Column at The Register

I started a new column at The Register, on the topic of DevOps. I used the first column to layout the case that DevOps is a thing, and baseline for how much adoption there currently is (enough, but not a lot – a “glass almost half full” type of situation). I was surprised by how many comments it kicked up!

Next up, I’ll try to pick key concepts and explain them, along with best and worst practices for adoption of those concepts. Or whatever else pops up to fill 800 words. Tell me if you have any ideas!

(You may recall had a brief column at The Register back when I was at 451 Research.)

Hey, biz bods: OpenStack will be worth $3.3bn by 2018 (Register Column)

OpenStack market sizing chart

My new somewhat monthly column in the channel section of The Register is up. It goes over 451’s recent OpenStack market-sizing and relates some anecdotes about how common it is to get outside help with private cloud installs. You know, of interest to people who’d be reading up on channel stuff.

One of the co-authors of the 451 report also has a nice summary up, available for free.
The folks at Piston pointed out that you could misread one of the mentions of them saying that their customers require PS work. In fact, they say, about 95% of their installs required no professional services work.

Hey, biz bods: OpenStack will be worth $3.3bn by 2018 (Register Column)

DevOps is actually a thing – and people are willing to pay for it (Register Column)

My second column at The Channel Register is up, a quick overview of our recent DevOps work at 451. They’ve got a fine strapline: “But you’ve got to untangle deployment wizards from the duct-tape cats”

At the moment, there’s some charts missing from it – I’m sure they’ll show up soon. In the meantime, you can see the charts here.

You may recall the first one on developers being “a thing.”.

DevOps is actually a thing – and people are willing to pay for it (Register Column)