Link: The Kubernetes Lesson

“In modern software development organizations, however, what gets used in development and testing environments has a habit of showing up in production. This was the opportunity that Kubernetes was built to take advantage of. It provided developers with a means – an open source means, naturally – of taking the containers they were so enamored of and running them in production environments, but without having to make determinations such as which containers run on which hardware. In its initial incarnation, this was the simple, basic job that Kubernetes was hired for.”
Original source: The Kubernetes Lesson

Link: Will UK lose global business and tech leader status post-Brexit?

‘James Governor, Analyst at RedMonk said: “Brexit will be the biggest systemic shock to British business in the more than 70 years. The scale of change will require an unprecedented investment in IT, with in-house application development becoming more important than ever to deal with complexity.”’
Original source: Will UK lose global business and tech leader status post-Brexit?

James Governor: The incredible shrinking time to legacy. On Time to Suck as a metric for dev and ops 

Turns out of course it’s not just Developer Time To Suck that is shrinking. Operations is heading the same way. Folks at Pivotal are saying that operating systems don’t matter, as we’ve moved further up the stack. Cloud Native is a proxy for saying much the same thing. But then, something is being written right now that will supplant Kubernetes. If we’re not running our own environments in house, operations disposability become increasingly realistic. Cattle not pets, for everything.

Source: The incredible shrinking time to legacy. On Time to Suck as a metric for dev and ops – James Governor’s Monkchips

The Internet is still the wild-west

Good pointing out of needing some law and ethics to catch up to the Internet:

The Internet brought us hyperconnectedness, but we’re really not ready to cope. We don’t have institutions and firewalls in place to prevent abuse of the system. The law can’t keep up, and doesn’t have the teeth in place anyway.


Containers in production survey, RedMonk/Anchore – Highlights

Some highlights from a recent survey on container usage among 338 respondents to a Anchore/ survey:

Containers in production:
…approximately one third of the participants are running containers in production, with development coming in slightly higher.
OS used:
Looking at the top five host operating systems across user roles we see Ubuntu having a particular strong lead among developers and architects.
Mesos, architect-types like it:
Interestingly Mesos still features strongly with architects. Among developer communities we very rarely hear Mesos mentioned anymore. On the other hand we frequently encounter architects have invested in Mesos from the perspective of their big data environments and are looking at a common approach for their container strategy. That said, this entire market is extremely fluid at the moment.
Jenkins leads CI:
…the combination of Jenkins and CloudBees (commercial Jenkins) approaching 50%.
Security worries:
Bluntly put [security] presents a barrier to adoption, and an opportunity for conservative organisations to hold off on adopting new technologies.
Our population breaks out with over 60% working in companies of greater than 100 people [and ~30% working in companies of greater than 5,000 people]…. With any data set of this nature, it is important to state that survey results strictly reflect the members of the community.
More context:
  • As you’ll recall, 451 estimates that the container market will be $2.7bn in 2020.
  • A 451 Research 1Q16 survey puts production use of containers at ~14%. It’s likely risen sense then, of course: maybe to around 18 to 20%?
  • A 3Q2015 survey put “container orchestration” use at just ~9%. Presumably this is dev/test and production, all uses. And, again, you’d assume that it’s risen since then. The question would be: are people using containers in production without orchestration? That seems slightly crazy except for the simplest workloads, eh?

When middle-management is screwing it all up – Pivotal Conversations

Whether it’s “DevOps,” “digital transformation,” or even “cloud” and “agile,” middle-management is all too common an issue. They simply won’t budge and help out. This isn’t always the case for sure, but “the frozen middle” is a common problem.

With a big ol’ panel of people (including two folks from RedMonk), we talk about tactics for thawing the frozen middle.

The WTF on Cloud-Native from Kenny Bastani and James Governor – Pivotal Conversations

Check out this talk on “cloud-native”:

We’ve got all your answers to “what exactly is ‘cloud-native’?” in this episode with special guests Pivotal’s Kenny Bastani and RedMonk’s James Governor. Kenny gives us a good overview of what cloud-native is, as Coté summarizes it: handling the configuration and automation for your applications along with all the supporting frameworks and platforms to do that. We then discuss the process (“culture”) angle, the origin of Spring Boot, the concept of “lock-in,” and if public cloud is needed or not. Bonus: serverless talk!

The crowded cloud native space

The wider Cloud Native ecosystem is, however, a very disparate and confused place. We anticipate a significant level of consolidation over the next twelve to eighteen months with some clear winners emerging. The emergence of several opinionated distributions of Kubernetes is hardly a surprise and this space will expand a little further before settling down.