Link: IBM fuses its software with Red Hat’s to launch hybrid-cloud juggernaut

The effort has started with IBM bundling Red Hat’s Kubernetes-based OpenShift Container Platform with more than 100 IBM products in what it calls Cloud Paks. OpenShift lets enterprise customers deploy and manage containers on their choice of infrastructure of choice, be it private or public clouds, including AWS, Microsoft Azure, Google Cloud Platform, Alibaba and IBM Cloud.

The prepackaged Cloud Paks include a secured Kubernetes container and containerized IBM middleware designed to let customers quickly spin-up enterprise-ready containers, the company said.

Five Cloud Paks exist today: Cloud Pak for Data, Application, Integration, Automation and Multicloud Management. The Paks will ultimately include IBM’s DB2, WebSphere, API Connect, Watson Studio, Cognos Analytics and more

Source: IBM fuses its software with Red Hat’s to launch hybrid-cloud juggernaut

Link: Microsoft, Red Hat Partner on OpenShift

The OpenShift-Azure deal extends collaboration between Microsoft and Red Hat that includes the addition of Microsoft SQL server on Red Hat Enterprise Linux. The deal signaled Microsoft’s embrace of OpenShift application container management.

The expanded partnership also gives OpenShift users access to public cloud services such as Azure Cosmos and SQL databases along with cloud-based machine learning models aimed at development of cloud-native enterprise applications.

OpenShift on Azure would “simplify container management on Kubernetes and help customers innovate on their cloud journeys,” added Scott Guthrie, executive vice president of Microsoft’s Cloud and AI Group.

Azure Red Hat OpenShift is available now on Microsoft Azure

Source: Microsoft, Red Hat Partner on OpenShift

Link: Big Blue Puts on a Red Hat: IBM Acquires Red Hat

While many organizations have extensive on and off premise infrastructure investments, comparatively few of them are sophisticated in the way that those environments are tied to each other. If expectations are scaled back to the more realistic “multi-cloud” – the idea that an organization may have investments in more than one environment – the relevance and importance of OpenShift becomes more clear.

This is clever to point out that enterprises have enough trouble integrating their existing, on-premise stuff, let along the complexity and newness of tying together public and private cloud.
Original source: Big Blue Puts on a Red Hat: IBM Acquires Red Hat

Link: Istio sets sail as Red Hat renovates OpenShift container ship

“The software serves as a management mechanism for distributed microservices, providing capabilities like traffic management, service identity and security, policy enforcement and telemetry among apps running across multiple Kubernetes clusters and hosts.”
Original source: Istio sets sail as Red Hat renovates OpenShift container ship

Link: Kubernetes is the new app server

Indeed!

‘Then there’s the whole cloud angle. Kubernetes has “quickly become the central container orchestration engine for most major cloud providers, including Amazon Web Services, Microsoft Azure, Google Cloud Platform, IBM Cloud, and Red Hat OpenShift,” Guiu states. “With services like Amazon EKS, Azure Kubernetes Service, and Google Kubernetes Engine the developer experience is becoming more seamless and doesn’t require a developer to install, manage, or operate Kubernetes clusters. We’re going to see further innovation here so that a developer can just drop an application and run it in Kubernetes without having to build the Docker image.”’
Original source: Kubernetes is the new app server

Link: Red Hat’s James Talks About the Importance of Open Source Innovat

People always want MSPs is to add higher level services, to become more like public cloud. Also, some arch open source/lock-in talk.
Original source: Red Hat’s James Talks About the Importance of Open Source Innovat

Link: Red Hat’s James Talks About the Importance of Open Source Innovat

People always want MSPs is to add higher level services, to become more like public cloud. Also, some arch open source/lock-in talk.
Original source: Red Hat’s James Talks About the Importance of Open Source Innovat

Link: Galloping greenback rocks Red Hat

“30 per cent growth in emerging technologies came in part from 100 new customers signing up for the company’s OpenShift container platform…. The company’s services business grew nicely and president and CEO Jim Whitehurst proudly pointed out that Red Hat now has over 1,000 subscribers, up 70 per cent year on year.”

And:

“The company also admitted to some weakness in its middleware business, but Whitehurst said that should turn around as sales of OpenShift pick up because it needs middleware. However Shander said Oracle and IBM are discounting middleware by 98 per cent “or whatever it takes to hold onto that tail of the business”, making the field hard.’
Original source: Galloping greenback rocks Red Hat

Link: The Kubernetes ‘fork’: Open source purists miss the point | InfoWorld

“Enterprises want stuff that works. As much as we in the open source world chatter and fret about vendor lockin, enterprises have demonstrated a remarkable ability to shrug off that concern and buy deeply into Microsoft, Oracle, and, yes, Red Hat’s OpenShift.”
Original source: The Kubernetes ‘fork’: Open source purists miss the point | InfoWorld

Link: ​Ubuntu’s Mark Shuttleworth pulls no punches on Red Hat and VMware in OpenStack cloud

“If you want OpenStack and Kubernetes support with vendor independence at a low price, Canonical is your company. If you prefer a partner, which offers a soup-to-nuts stack, but at a higher price, look to Red Hat. And, of course, if you’re already wedded to VMware, you’ve made your choice. There’s room for all these approaches to the 21st century cloud and containers.”
Original source: ​Ubuntu’s Mark Shuttleworth pulls no punches on Red Hat and VMware in OpenStack cloud

Link: ​Ubuntu’s Mark Shuttleworth pulls no punches on Red Hat and VMware in OpenStack cloud

“If you want OpenStack and Kubernetes support with vendor independence at a low price, Canonical is your company. If you prefer a partner, which offers a soup-to-nuts stack, but at a higher price, look to Red Hat. And, of course, if you’re already wedded to VMware, you’ve made your choice. There’s room for all these approaches to the 21st century cloud and containers.”
Original source: ​Ubuntu’s Mark Shuttleworth pulls no punches on Red Hat and VMware in OpenStack cloud

Link: ​Ubuntu’s Mark Shuttleworth pulls no punches on Red Hat and VMware in OpenStack cloud

“If you want OpenStack and Kubernetes support with vendor independence at a low price, Canonical is your company. If you prefer a partner, which offers a soup-to-nuts stack, but at a higher price, look to Red Hat. And, of course, if you’re already wedded to VMware, you’ve made your choice. There’s room for all these approaches to the 21st century cloud and containers.”
Original source: ​Ubuntu’s Mark Shuttleworth pulls no punches on Red Hat and VMware in OpenStack cloud

Link: CoreOS Is New Linux, Not A RHEL Classic Killer

‘Importantly, the OpenShift platform cloud software, which included Red Hat’s own implementation of the Kubernetes container controller, will be deployable on either the full-on Red Hat Enterprise Linux in pets mode or the minimalist Red Hat CoreOS in cattle mode. But it will be using the Tectonic version of the Kubernetes controller going forward as well as integrating the Prometheus monitoring tool and etcd for storing telemetry. Gracely tells The Next Platform that the implementation of Kubernetes had outside dependencies such as the CloudForms hybrid cloud management tool (formerly ManageIQ) and was not “native” to Kubernetes in the same way that Tectonic is, meaning free of outside dependenies.’
Original source: CoreOS Is New Linux, Not A RHEL Classic Killer

Link: Bringing CoreOS technology to Red Hat OpenShift to deliver a next-generation automated Kubernetes platform

“With the acquisition, Container Linux will be reborn as Red Hat CoreOS, a new entry into the Red Hat ecosystem. Red Hat CoreOS will be based on Fedora and Red Hat Enterprise Linux sources and is expected to ultimately supersede Atomic Host as Red Hat’s immutable, container-centric operating system.

“Red Hat CoreOS will provide the foundation for Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform, Red Hat OpenShift Online, and Red Hat OpenShift Dedicated. Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform will also, of course, continue to support Red Hat Enterprise Linux for those who prefer its lifecycle and packaging as the foundation for their Kubernetes deployments.

“Current Container Linux users can rest easy that Red Hat plans continue investing in the operating system and community. The project is an important base for container-based environments by delivering automated updates with strong security capabilities, and as a part of our commitment and vision we plan to support Container Linux as you know it today for the community and Tectonic users alike.”
Original source: Bringing CoreOS technology to Red Hat OpenShift to deliver a next-generation automated Kubernetes platform

Link: Microsoft sees Red …Hat for OpenShift-on-Azure public cloud offering

‘Rollout of the partnership will occur in two phases, with Azure support for OpenShift Container Platform and Red Hat Enterprise Linux on Azure and Azure Stack available now. The jointly managed OpenShift on Azure project is slated to go into its preview phase “in the coming months.”’
Original source: Microsoft sees Red …Hat for OpenShift-on-Azure public cloud offering

Link: When AI meets digital transformation: 4 areas where AI fits now | The Enterprisers Project

Still no case studies of enterprises actually using AI/ML, but some interesting examples of “boring” enterprise workflows that could be automated with some machine learning, like accounting.
Original source: When AI meets digital transformation: 4 areas where AI fits now | The Enterprisers Project

Link: Red Hat is in the pink: Cracks $3bn revenue run rate as subs take off

“Full fiscal year subscription revenue hit $2.6 billion, up 21 per cent year-over-year”
Original source: Red Hat is in the pink: Cracks $3bn revenue run rate as subs take off

Link: Docker Who? By Acquiring CoreOS, Red Hat Aims to Be the Kubernetes Company

“So while this deal clearly changes the playing field for Kubernetes in the developer space, and probably further marginalizes Docker, it may actually not be the kind of “market consolidation” that used to characterize the maturity of a software platform. More likely, it’s the latest step by a major player in the server marketplace to find a way to capitalize on the success of a product that, had it been commercial and proprietary from the start, might have been a gold mine… except that, had it been commercial and proprietary, no one would have ever heard of it.”
Original source: Docker Who? By Acquiring CoreOS, Red Hat Aims to Be the Kubernetes Company