Atlassian revenue up 47% y/y

The enterprise collaboration software vendor said it earned 12 cents a share, three cents ahead of the consensus estimate. Revenue climbed 41.7% year over year to $193.8 million, also above the $185.8 million analysts had forecasted.

You know what they say: developers don’t pay for anything.

Someone either needs to acquire Atlassian, it has to start acquiring companies, or if the private cloud thing becomes cemented, they need to work with the public cloud three to build out the private cloud toolchain. IBM and CA are the traditional ALM/SDLC acquirers (with occasional raids by the Microsoft barbarians), but that doesn’t seem likely anymore? 

Here, maybe Oracle if they double down on appdev for their new PaaS: retaining their existing Java+Oracle DB empire, feeding it into PaaS? That’s a bit too ornate of a strategy for such as big asset as Atlassian, though.
There’s always PE for big bundling plays, but what would the PE exit strategy be?
Source: At Last! Atlassian Surges on Strong Earnings, Forecast

Ansible driving millions in sales

“Ansible, a DevOps automation engine that’s often used with Kubernetes deployments, was big, responsible for six of the quarter’s transactions of over $1 million. This included one deal valued at over $5 million — “our largest deal ever for Ansible,” according to Shander.”

Also, updates on RHEL, OpenStack, and OpenShift. And Oracle.


Oracle losing legacy software sales, growing (public?) cloud sales

Once again, the key metric of new software license sales was off—falling 19% to $1.35 billion compared to last year, and missing analysts’ expectations of $1.44 billion.

On the other hand:

“Our cloud revenue will be larger than our new software license revenue next fiscal year, when the transition will be largely complete.”


“Our cloud applications goal is to be the world largest and most profitable SaaS company. We are growing our cloud business much faster than, and we can beat them to the $10 billion mark, but it’s going to be close,” Ellison told analysts on the call.


Database-as-a-service, which basically runs a company’s database on a third party’s cloud, is a fast-growing category for Oracle, according to the company. In fact, Oracle co-CEO Mark Hurd said that business was up 700% year over year, hitting $100 million in quarterly revenue.

Source: Oracle’s Cloud Business Has Yet to Surpass Its Falling License Sales

RedHat selling more OpenStack, e.g., to Verizon

Whitehurst thinks no one is paying enough attention to Open Stack, the freely-available software stack. “We had three deals over a million dollars last quarter,” for Open Stack, said Whitehurst. “We are finally seeing it move into production in a pretty significant scale. Verizon [Communications] and others are running our Open Stack, and so to reach that production point is pretty exciting.”

Source: Red Hat Rising: Bulls Breathe Sigh of Relief as Linux Rebounds.

CA Technologies FY2015Q1 marginalia, experimenting with CriticMarkup

Screenshot of markdowning next to rendering

While reading through CA’s recent quarterly conference call transcript, I thought I’d try out an idea I had this morning: using CriticMarkup to DIY what does: annotating content. It worked OK, except I didn’t invest time in getting the HTML output right, so it looks kind of crappy – you can see the raw markdown file as well.

I actually tried using as well, but it started acting goofy so I gave up.

I’d love to be able to do more of these, but I need to get the publishing part right. The HTML is actually pretty simple, I just need a good stylesheet and (I’m guessing) some JavaScript. Any takers to help out?