Link: The New HPE Sheriff Lays Down The Hybrid IT Law

“The larger problem, as we have pointed out before, is that it is very difficult to make a buck in the server, storage, and networking business with so many big buyers pushing down prices, enterprises shifting some compute from their own datacenters to public clouds (and therefore some of their budgets from capex to opex), and so many companies competing to sell wares to datacenters.”
Original source: The New HPE Sheriff Lays Down The Hybrid IT Law

Link: Dropbox S-1 Analysis – The King of Freemium

“Founded in 2007, Dropbox epitomizes the freemium go-to-market. Dropbox has grown from 0 to 500 million users over that time period. 2% of those users convert to paid and pay an average of $9.33 per month. 90% of revenue originates through self serve channels – an astounding figure for company that generated more than $1B in revenue last year.”
Original source: Dropbox S-1 Analysis – The King of Freemium

Link: ‘Amazon-proof’ Home Depot builds on its DIY digital foundations

“Versus prior year, our online sales grew 21% in the fourth quarter and 21.5% in fiscal 2017, now representing 6.7% of our total sales. While we are seeing significant growth in our online sales, these online shoppers see the relevance of our stores as approximately 46% of our online U.S. orders are picked up in our stores”
Original source: ‘Amazon-proof’ Home Depot builds on its DIY digital foundations

​Link: Red Hat on its way to becoming the first billion-dollar-a-quarter open-source company

‘I’ll tell you something that’s not fantasy. In the next few years, Red Hat will become the first billion-dollar-a-quarter open-source company, and that’s real money… Here’s how. First, as Jim Whitehurst, Red Hat CEO, said in the earnings call, “We anticipate exiting the fiscal year with an annualized run-rate of approximately $3 billion for total revenue.”’

Link to original

Atlassian revenue up 47% y/y

The enterprise collaboration software vendor said it earned 12 cents a share, three cents ahead of the consensus estimate. Revenue climbed 41.7% year over year to $193.8 million, also above the $185.8 million analysts had forecasted.

You know what they say: developers don’t pay for anything.

Someone either needs to acquire Atlassian, it has to start acquiring companies, or if the private cloud thing becomes cemented, they need to work with the public cloud three to build out the private cloud toolchain. IBM and CA are the traditional ALM/SDLC acquirers (with occasional raids by the Microsoft barbarians), but that doesn’t seem likely anymore? 

Here, maybe Oracle if they double down on appdev for their new PaaS: retaining their existing Java+Oracle DB empire, feeding it into PaaS? That’s a bit too ornate of a strategy for such as big asset as Atlassian, though.
There’s always PE for big bundling plays, but what would the PE exit strategy be?
Source: At Last! Atlassian Surges on Strong Earnings, Forecast

Ansible driving millions in sales

“Ansible, a DevOps automation engine that’s often used with Kubernetes deployments, was big, responsible for six of the quarter’s transactions of over $1 million. This included one deal valued at over $5 million — “our largest deal ever for Ansible,” according to Shander.”

Also, updates on RHEL, OpenStack, and OpenShift. And Oracle.

Link