Link: Azure Kubernetes Service (AKS) Is Now Generally Available – More Regions and New Features

“The GA release of AKS includes a set of new features available in all regions like the Kubernetes role-based access control (RBAC), Azure Active Directory-based identity, and the ability to deploy clusters into pre-existing custom virtual networks.”
Original source: Azure Kubernetes Service (AKS) Is Now Generally Available – More Regions and New Features

Link: Enterprises taking path of greatest resistance to cloud, survey shows

Still a lot of stuff on-premises, and people want to move it to public cloud:

‘More than 80 percent of respondents have more than 100 applications under their purview, and a solid majority have a good deal still managed on-premises. The survey finds 74 percent stating at least half of these applications are on-premises. Another 71 percent of respondents see many of their on-premises applications as mission-critical to their business.’

How they’re moving apps:

‘Yet, the report’s authors state, “enterprises are choosing the path of most resistance, unintentionally creating a self-induced cloud skills gap.” That consists of cloud migration strategies that require the highest degree of IT skills — 49 percent cited refactoring or rewriting applications as their primary modernization strategy.

‘One in five, 20 percent, say they are rewriting core applications from scratch using cloud-native PaaS services. Another 28 percent are refactoring applications for the cloud using cloud-natuive and traditional applications. Another 20 percent are outright replacing applications with SaaS-based applications. About 12 percent are taking a “lift-and-shift” approach to simply move entire applications to hosted services.’

Survey of 450 “executive,” by 451 Research.
Original source: Enterprises taking path of greatest resistance to cloud, survey shows

Link: Enterprises taking path of greatest resistance to cloud, survey shows

Still a lot of stuff on-premises, and people want to move it to public cloud:

‘More than 80 percent of respondents have more than 100 applications under their purview, and a solid majority have a good deal still managed on-premises. The survey finds 74 percent stating at least half of these applications are on-premises. Another 71 percent of respondents see many of their on-premises applications as mission-critical to their business.’

How they’re moving apps:

‘Yet, the report’s authors state, “enterprises are choosing the path of most resistance, unintentionally creating a self-induced cloud skills gap.” That consists of cloud migration strategies that require the highest degree of IT skills — 49 percent cited refactoring or rewriting applications as their primary modernization strategy.

‘One in five, 20 percent, say they are rewriting core applications from scratch using cloud-native PaaS services. Another 28 percent are refactoring applications for the cloud using cloud-natuive and traditional applications. Another 20 percent are outright replacing applications with SaaS-based applications. About 12 percent are taking a “lift-and-shift” approach to simply move entire applications to hosted services.’

Survey of 450 “executive,” by 451 Research.
Original source: Enterprises taking path of greatest resistance to cloud, survey shows

Link: Enterprises taking path of greatest resistance to cloud, survey shows

Still a lot of stuff on-premises, and people want to move it to public cloud:

‘More than 80 percent of respondents have more than 100 applications under their purview, and a solid majority have a good deal still managed on-premises. The survey finds 74 percent stating at least half of these applications are on-premises. Another 71 percent of respondents see many of their on-premises applications as mission-critical to their business.’

How they’re moving apps:

‘Yet, the report’s authors state, “enterprises are choosing the path of most resistance, unintentionally creating a self-induced cloud skills gap.” That consists of cloud migration strategies that require the highest degree of IT skills — 49 percent cited refactoring or rewriting applications as their primary modernization strategy.

‘One in five, 20 percent, say they are rewriting core applications from scratch using cloud-native PaaS services. Another 28 percent are refactoring applications for the cloud using cloud-natuive and traditional applications. Another 20 percent are outright replacing applications with SaaS-based applications. About 12 percent are taking a “lift-and-shift” approach to simply move entire applications to hosted services.’

Survey of 450 “executive,” by 451 Research.
Original source: Enterprises taking path of greatest resistance to cloud, survey shows

Link: Gartner Forecasts Worldwide Public Cloud Revenue to Grow 21.4 Percent in 2018

“The worldwide public cloud services market is projected to grow 21.4 percent in 2018 to total $186.4 billion, up from $153.5 billion in 2017, according to Gartner, Inc.

The fastest-growing segment of the market is cloud system infrastructure services (infrastructure as a service or IaaS), which is forecast to grow 35.9 percent in 2018 to reach $40.8 billion (see Table 1).

Gartner expects the top 10 providers to account for nearly 70 percent of the IaaS market by 2021, up from 50 percent in 2016.”
Original source: Gartner Forecasts Worldwide Public Cloud Revenue to Grow 21.4 Percent in 2018

Link: Look at stupid, sexy Kubernetes with all the cloud firms hanging off its musclebound arms

“I think that a lot of companies find themselves using Kubernetes because it’s going to be built into the AWS’s and the Azures and so on,” Longbottom said. “So if you’re going to be looking at a hybrid cloud then you might as well be putting Kubernetes in place in your private cloud environment, because you’ll be able to plug far more easily into the public cloud component of the hybrid.”
Original source: Look at stupid, sexy Kubernetes with all the cloud firms hanging off its musclebound arms

Link: Is Microsoft Azure really making up ground on AWS?

In terms of raw figures, not growth, Azure is still a way behind. Even a generous assumption of Azure’s share of that US$5.3 billion intelligent cloud revenue figure for the quarter would put it well behind the US$5.1 billion AWS racked in over a similar period. Dave Bartoletti, a principal analyst at Forrester estimates AWS revenue at US$18 billion and Azure, excluding Office 365 and other non-platform revenue, at US$12 billion for the calendar year. “Azure has been growing faster on a smaller base, yes, but in our view, AWS’s growth is still very strong even at their size,” he added. “Azure is giving AWS a run globally, and is close to feature parity on many services. “Azure has also aggressively built out global regions and is on par with AWS for global data centre locations. It’s a healthy and exciting market, and Azure’s doing quite well.”
Original source: Is Microsoft Azure really making up ground on AWS?