Link: Look at stupid, sexy Kubernetes with all the cloud firms hanging off its musclebound arms

“I think that a lot of companies find themselves using Kubernetes because it’s going to be built into the AWS’s and the Azures and so on,” Longbottom said. “So if you’re going to be looking at a hybrid cloud then you might as well be putting Kubernetes in place in your private cloud environment, because you’ll be able to plug far more easily into the public cloud component of the hybrid.”
Original source: Look at stupid, sexy Kubernetes with all the cloud firms hanging off its musclebound arms

Link: Is Microsoft Azure really making up ground on AWS?

In terms of raw figures, not growth, Azure is still a way behind. Even a generous assumption of Azure’s share of that US$5.3 billion intelligent cloud revenue figure for the quarter would put it well behind the US$5.1 billion AWS racked in over a similar period. Dave Bartoletti, a principal analyst at Forrester estimates AWS revenue at US$18 billion and Azure, excluding Office 365 and other non-platform revenue, at US$12 billion for the calendar year. “Azure has been growing faster on a smaller base, yes, but in our view, AWS’s growth is still very strong even at their size,” he added. “Azure is giving AWS a run globally, and is close to feature parity on many services. “Azure has also aggressively built out global regions and is on par with AWS for global data centre locations. It’s a healthy and exciting market, and Azure’s doing quite well.”
Original source: Is Microsoft Azure really making up ground on AWS?

Link: Worldwide Public Cloud Services Spending Forecast to Reach $160 Billion This Year, According to IDC

Includes an interesting chart that lists the types of services/features (like data management and appdev platforms) that compose vendor revenue. Plus geographic and vertical rankings. But, just a press release.
Original source: Worldwide Public Cloud Services Spending Forecast to Reach $160 Billion This Year, According to IDC

Rackspace positioning around cloud and OpenStack, from the CEO

Now that they don’t have to compete with AWS, they have an extra $300m floating around in the spreadsheets:

“Ultimately now it’s about how are we going to build a stronger company. If we don’t have to go spend $300 million a year in capital competing against Amazon, building computing storage and networking, where should we go put that? In things like managed cybersecurity and professional services,” said Rhodes.

On OpenStack, finding the product/market for for private cloud:

And what about OpenStack, the open-source cloud computing platform that Rackspace created with NASA?

“We thought the world wanted another alternative to public cloud,” said Rhodes. “What we are learning is the world doesn’t need another public cloud, so OpenStack is shifting form and going private cloud.”

Also, cameo from my former 451 colleague Carl Brooks.

Link

Huawei public cloud momentum

The company sells a public cloud platform, mostly based on OpenStack, to service providers who want to stand up their own clouds. A sampling of customers thus far from Agatha’s recent report:

the group claims to have deployed more than 1.4 million virtual machines for customers across the board, and enabled the commercial deployments of public cloud (T-Systems’ Open Telekom Cloud), hybrid cloud (Vodafone’s Vodaplex Hybrid Cloud Platform) and HPC (University of Warsaw’s Top500 HPC project’s HPC cluster).

Source: Huawei pushes further into the telecom market with its public cloud platform

60% of enterprises using or planning to use public IaaS by the end of 2016, IDC

IDC’s IaaS forecast is out, tragically, I don’t have access to it. However, here’s some highlights from the press release:

  • Public IaaS is in wide use “A recent survey of over 6,000 IT organizations found that nearly two thirds of the respondents are either already using or planning to use public cloud IaaS by the end of 2016.”
  • Public IaaS is a large, fast growing market – the overall IaaS market is forecast to grow from $12.6bn in 2015 to $43.6bn in 2020, a CAGR of 28.2%.
  • Yup, fast growing – growth from 2014 to 2015 was 51%
  • People use more than one IaaS, and probably “cloud” – “[H]ybrid cloud infrastructure is already a common pattern at several large enterprises and IDC predicts that 80% of IT organizations will be committed to hybrid architectures by 2018″ – notice they say “large enterprises,” which suggests a cut of the data by company size: last I recall, IDC defined “large enterprise” as 2,500+ people, which may or may not be the case here.
  • A few cloud providers dominate – Amazon is still king, and there’s an fat-head of marketshare: “In 2015, 56% of the revenue and 59% of the absolute growth went to the top 10 IaaS vendors.”

Contrast that 60% IaaS usage with the 45% use in a recent Morgan Stanley CIO survey. I don’t think that’s a huge difference, but it does show the fiddliness of these kinds of surveys. To be fair, the Morgan Stanley survey has public IaaS usage at ~90% by 2019. I’d trust IDC a lot more, esp. with 6,000 surveyed vs. 100.

Also, while I can’t verify this: I’d assume this public IaaS is not to the exclusion of private cloud/on-premises. To be sure, some, or even much, of it must be public cloud gobbling up on-premises usage and revenue. However, I wouldn’t take it as a zero-sum game between the two.

Source: Enterprise Adoption Driving Strong Growth of Public Cloud Infrastructure as a Service, According to IDC – prUS41599716

CPI case study: IBM and SoftLayer would be greater together

Data from 451 Research’s Cloud Price Index suggests that IBM is missing a trick. By going all-in and baking SoftLayer with Bluemix, IBM would gain a leading position in the market in terms of completeness of services and global availability, as well as finally delivering a single user experience.

Owen over at 451 suggests that IBM hasn’t yet merged SoftLayer into Bluemix totally, missing out on a high ranking in cloud providers (by functionality, geographic availability, etc.). Also: “The company claims $10.2bn in cloud revenue, a growth rate of 46% Y/Y, and 20,000 new users per week.”

Source: CPI case study: IBM and SoftLayer would be greater together