🗂 Link: A spot of after-hours business email does you good, apparently

Published in the Computers in Human Behaviour academic journal, the study enumerates no fewer than 72 actions that people apparently take while managing their work emails. We can count five – delete, mark as spam, forward, reply and read but ignore – and can only imagine that reaching the figure of 72 must include crying and rocking in the corner of the office while reading the full contents of one’s inbox.

Source: A spot of after-hours business email does you good, apparently

🗂 Link: BBC – Future – What the voice inside your head says about you

He compares it to parachuting into an otherwise undisturbed forest: a few small creatures might scurry away, but you can still observe and describe a lot of the forest’s features in something that’s as close to their undisturbed state as you’re ever likely to get.

Source: BBC – Future – What the voice inside your head says about you

Link: Fixed vs. Growth: The Two Basic Mindsets That Shape Our Lives

What it all comes down to is that a mindset is an interpretative process that tells us what is going on around us. In the fixed mindset, that process is scored by an internal monologue of constant judging and evaluation, using every piece of information as evidence either for or against such assessments as whether you’re a good person, whether your partner is selfish, or whether you are better than the person next to you. In a growth mindset, on the other hand, the internal monologue is not one of judgment but one of voracious appetite for learning, constantly seeking out the kind of input that you can metabolize into learning and constructive action.
Original source: Fixed vs. Growth: The Two Basic Mindsets That Shape Our Lives

Link: Unknown Unknowns: The Problem of Hypocognition

“Consider this: how well can you discern different shades of blue? If you speak Russian, Greek, Turkish, Korean or Japanese, your chances are much better than if you speak English. The former groups have two distinctive linguistic representations of blue. In Russian, for example, dark blue (sinii) and light blue (goluboi) are as distinct as red and pink. But in English, we know blue as a single concept. The deprivation of finer-grained color concepts poses a great perceptual disadvantage. English speakers more easily confuse blue shades, not because we have poorer vision, but because we lack the more granular distinctions in the language we speak.”
Original source: Unknown Unknowns: The Problem of Hypocognition

Link: Unknown Unknowns: The Problem of Hypocognition

“Consider this: how well can you discern different shades of blue? If you speak Russian, Greek, Turkish, Korean or Japanese, your chances are much better than if you speak English. The former groups have two distinctive linguistic representations of blue. In Russian, for example, dark blue (sinii) and light blue (goluboi) are as distinct as red and pink. But in English, we know blue as a single concept. The deprivation of finer-grained color concepts poses a great perceptual disadvantage. English speakers more easily confuse blue shades, not because we have poorer vision, but because we lack the more granular distinctions in the language we speak.”
Original source: Unknown Unknowns: The Problem of Hypocognition

Link: On Preferring A to B, while also preferring B to A

‘There is a tendency to think that joint evaluation is always better since it is the “full information” condition. Sunstein pushes against this interpretation because he argues that full information doesn’t mean full rationality.’

Placing value on something is situational and filled mostly with personal (or organization) judgement.
Original source: On Preferring A to B, while also preferring B to A

Link: Try to Resist Misinterpreting the Marshmallow Test

If you’re poor in options in the present, you’re less likely to wait for long term profits.

“Following this logic, multiple studies over the years have confirmed that people living in poverty or who experience chaotic futures tend to prefer the sure thing now over waiting for a larger reward that might never come.”
Original source: Try to Resist Misinterpreting the Marshmallow Test

Link: Try to Resist Misinterpreting the Marshmallow Test

If you’re poor in options in the present, you’re less likely to wait for long term profits.

“Following this logic, multiple studies over the years have confirmed that people living in poverty or who experience chaotic futures tend to prefer the sure thing now over waiting for a larger reward that might never come.”
Original source: Try to Resist Misinterpreting the Marshmallow Test

Link: From Pink Milk to Smart Questions, How to Be a Rebel Leader

“We underestimate how flattering it is to be asked for advice. By asking questions, we give others the opportunity to share their personal experience and wisdom, thus stroking their ego. Curiosity is a way of being rebellious in the world. Rebels fight their fears and are willing to push past the discomfort of showing others that they need their help. It may feel scary, but it brings about all sorts of benefits. Curiosity is related to both greater positive emotions and greater closeness when we interact with strangers for the first time. In one study my colleagues and I conducted.”
Original source: From Pink Milk to Smart Questions, How to Be a Rebel Leader

Link: From Pink Milk to Smart Questions, How to Be a Rebel Leader

“We underestimate how flattering it is to be asked for advice. By asking questions, we give others the opportunity to share their personal experience and wisdom, thus stroking their ego. Curiosity is a way of being rebellious in the world. Rebels fight their fears and are willing to push past the discomfort of showing others that they need their help. It may feel scary, but it brings about all sorts of benefits. Curiosity is related to both greater positive emotions and greater closeness when we interact with strangers for the first time. In one study my colleagues and I conducted.”
Original source: From Pink Milk to Smart Questions, How to Be a Rebel Leader

Seeking the simple answer considered harmful

“This ties to our species’ well-documented, frequently harmful distaste for uncertainty. All too often, people latch recklessly onto easy and straightforward answers that happen to be quite wrong. It’s yet another human foible Trump has expertly exploited, and is himself victimized by.

“That’s one of the real prices we pay for not being comfortable with uncertainty,” said Lewis. “We end up seeking out charlatans, people who will tell us with total certainty stuff that is unknowable, and so you end up with bad financial advisers or quacks in medicine — and Trump, who appeals to that need for total certainty, and seems to preserve it in himself by never acknowledging he made a mistake.”

Source: “Michael Lewis on the Psychological Quirks Trump Exploited to Become President”

Antidepressants seem to work…probably

…most of the time, prescribing an antidepressant is not about making somebody “better than well” but rather helping to relieve a patient’s acute suffering enough that she can resume a semblance of normal life.

Source: Should We Still Listen to Prozac? Peter D. Kramer Jumps Back Into the Antidepressant Debate