American Airlines is a good profile of enterprise cloud buyer’s needs, hopes & dreams – Notebook

While this is sort of a bummer story for Pivotal (we’d like to have this account), it has a good profile of American and their needs in it. All of which are representative of other large organizations, e.g.:

  • Application types: “The first result is that the airline will migrate to the IBM Cloud some of its critical applications, including the main website, its customer-facing mobile app and its global network of check-in kiosks. Other workloads and tools, such as the company’s Cargo customer website, also will be moved to the IBM Cloud.”
  • Managed data-centers/cloud: “The airline will be able to utilize the global footprint of IBM Cloud, which consists of more than 50 data centers in 17 countries, in addition to a wide range of application development capabilities.”
  • Long-term planning: “We wanted to make sure that the cloud provider would be using Cloud Foundry and open-source technologies so we don’t get locked in by proprietary solutions,” Grubbs said. “We also wanted a partner that would offer us the agility to innovate at the organizational and process levels and have deep industry expertise with security at the core.”
  • We want to do all the new meat-ware: “As part of this process, American will work with IBM Global Services to use IBM’s Garage Methodology of creating applications through a micro-services architecture, design thinking, agile methodology, DevOps and lean development, the company said.”
  • Legacy, it’s how you got here: “IBM Cloud will help enable developers to build and change application functionalities for the airline’s customers. These customer-facing systems will be on the IBM Public Cloud, while American will maintain backend connectivity to other on-premise legacy and third-party systems, for true Hybrid Cloud functionality.”
  • There’s a lot going on: “American Airlines and its subsidiary, American Eagle, offer an average of 6,700 flights per day to about 350 destinations in more than 50 countries. American has hubs in Charlotte, Chicago, Dallas/Fort Worth, Los Angeles, Miami, New York, Philadelphia, Phoenix and Washington, D.C.”

Source: American Airlines Heads for a New Cloud with IBM

Remember when “gamification” was going to solve world (valuation) hunger?

Cyrus Farivar has a long piece on the rise and fall(?) of Zynga in Ars. Lots of delightful little bits on maxing the viruses and Zombies:

“ I got a turbo education on how to do the viral marketing,” he said. “It’s where you design features to be more social: go accomplish this with your friends. How can I make this fun, especially asynchronously, and how can I get people to invite more people? What was good and transformative about FarmVille [was that] it brought in tens of millions of adults who had never played [games] ever. It opened up casual light entertainment, and not time sensitive gaming, to 100 million people.”

As the title here suggests, it reminded me of “gamification”: how can you make boring things in your software fun so that users (read: people) use it more effectively. I’m never sure if it panned out for white-collar work. I’m note sure filling out quarterly performance reviews or weekly sales data could ever be “fun.” It’s kind of fun in Foursquare and other places that outsource (mostly meatspace) data collection.

Also, awesome quote on being too data driven:

I had a PM tell me—many times—that they “couldn’t get data on fun.”

Remember when “gamification” was going to solve world (valuation) hunger?

This Is the Woman at the Heart of Everything Google Builds

Using RedMonk logic: companies tend to keep what they consider their competative advantage closed source; Google keeps their dev toolchain closed source; Google’s ability to more productive in development (the primary point of a dev toolchain) is a core differentiator for Google. QED.

More: This Is the Woman at the Heart of Everything Google Builds