Link: Google’s new cloud chief has a culture clash ahead of him after 22 years at Oracle

But when it comes to the big storage and core computing contracts, numerous industry experts, venture capitalists and tech executives alike told CNBC that Google’s sales team is ineffective, preferring to sell what it thinks is best rather than what customers say they need.

“You don’t get paid to be right, you get paid to sell what the customer wants to buy,” said Mackey Craven, a partner at venture firm OpenView Venture Partners in Boston who focuses on enterprise start-ups.
Original source: Google’s new cloud chief has a culture clash ahead of him after 22 years at Oracle

Link: Internal Product Management: the Good, the Bad and the Ugly — Black Swan Farming

For internal products, the “customer” is the enterprise, usually their strategy and execution, aka, “grind and stack.” Staff are, often sadly, meatware enablers in the value stream just like any technology. Optimize the VSM, make more paper.
Original source: Internal Product Management: the Good, the Bad and the Ugly — Black Swan Farming

Dealing with “disposable software” for enterprises

With consumer SaaSes and mobile apps coming and going, I’ve been thinking of the idea of “disposable software”: apps that last a year or so, but aren’t guaranteed to last longer. In the consumer space, there’s rarely been a guarantee that free software will last – that’s part of the “price” you pay for free.

This mentality is getting into business software more and more, however, and I don’t think “enterprises” are prepared for it. Part of the premium you pay for enterprise software should include the guarantee that it will have a longer life-cycle, but it’s worth asking if it does.

Also, it’s good for enterprises to be aware of vendors, particularly open source driven ones, are putting out code that might be “disposable.” The prevailing product management think nowadays encourages experimenting and trying things out: abandoning “failed” experiments and continuing successful ones. Clearly, if you’re a “normal” enterprise, you want to avoid those failed experiments and, at best, properly control and govern your use of them.

Of course, there are trade-offs:

  • With consumer, experiment-driven software, you’re always getting the newest thinking, which might turn out to be a good idea and provide your business with differentiating, “secret sauce”; or it might be a failed experiment that gets canceled
  • With “enterprise,” stable software you can generally count on it existing and being supported next year; but you’ll often be behind the curve on innovation, meaning you’ll have to layer on the “secret sauce” on your own.

It’s good to engage with both types of strategies, you just have manage the approach to hedge the risks of each.