Link: GDPR compliance – here are the 14 things you actually need to do

Exciting new audit needs ahead, hoss: “Organisations should review their IT systems and procedures to check they comply with GDPR requirements for privacy by design, ensuring only the minimum amount of personal data necessary is processed. Privacy Impact Assessments (PIAs) should be completed when using new technologies and the data processing is likely to result in a high risk to individuals.”
Original source: GDPR compliance – here are the 14 things you actually need to do

“Give us your passwords, foreigner” – DHS mulls password collection at borders

Kelly noted that while this was “still a work in progress” and not necessarily “what we’re going to do right now,” he added that President Donald Trump’s freeze on entry to the U.S. by citizens of seven countries, “is giving us an opportunity… to get more serious than we have been about how we look at people coming into the United States.”

“These are the things we’re thinking about,” he said. “We can ask them for this kind of information, and if they truly want to come into America, then they’ll cooperate. If not, you know, next in line.”

It’s be nice to find the exact back and forth, somewhere in this five and half hour Home Security Committee video.

Also, it’s further in the “life becoming more like Black Mirror” vein. Recall that episode where people are required to review all their memories when they cross borders and enter airports.

Source: “DHS mulls password collection at borders.”

Programming society with big data and small cash payments

The mathematical modeling of society is made possible, according to Pentland, by the innate tractability of human beings. We may think of ourselves as rational actors, in conscious control of our choices, but in reality most of what we do is reflexive. Our behavior is determined by our subliminal reactions to the influence of other people, particularly those in the various peer groups we belong to. “The power of social physics,” he writes, “comes from the fact that almost all of our day-to-day actions are habitual, based mostly on what we have learned from observing the behavior of others.” Once you map and measure all of a person’s social influences, you can develop a statistical model that predicts that person’s behavior, just as you can model the path a billiard ball will take after it strikes other balls.

Source: Big data and the limits of social engineering

Looks like Amazon cloud will help out the CIA afterall

The contentious section asked the parties to price up a fault-tolerant cluster of 1,000s of commodity servers running a MapReduce scatter-gather job on about 100TB of data with a 100 per cent duty cycle.

In other words, the CIA wanted Amazon and IBM to cost out a cloud cluster that would run MapReduce continuously for a year so spies could prod large chunks of data.

Looks like Amazon cloud will help out the CIA afterall