Link: Why are antiques now so cheap?

‘eBay and the internet have increased supply more than demand. It is much easier to sell an estate, or the contents of your attic, than before. But the upward potential for demand in the market isn’t nearly as significant. Some people say “well, I would in fact buy and collect antiques if I could get the right 18th century pieces at 40% their current values,” but many more people just aren’t interested at all.’

The Internet destroying yet another market by connecting people across geographies. Perhaps it was false value in the first place.
Original source: Why are antiques now so cheap?

Link: Why are antiques now so cheap?

‘eBay and the internet have increased supply more than demand. It is much easier to sell an estate, or the contents of your attic, than before. But the upward potential for demand in the market isn’t nearly as significant. Some people say “well, I would in fact buy and collect antiques if I could get the right 18th century pieces at 40% their current values,” but many more people just aren’t interested at all.’

The Internet destroying yet another market by connecting people across geographies. Perhaps it was false value in the first place.
Original source: Why are antiques now so cheap?

Link: Global race for 5G heats up with latest US Congress bill

“Prices vary widely across the United States but the average cost of installing equipment on a pole is around $2,000 per year. AT&T recently complained that it had received an estimate of $8,000 a year from a city in California. Even in low-cost Georgia, the local government felt it could get away with asking for $6,000 per pole per year…. There are roughly 350,000 base stations in the US and that number would likely have to quadruple (again, these are all rough figures) for 5G. So the annual cost of simply hosting 5G equipment is in the billions of dollars.”
Original source: Global race for 5G heats up with latest US Congress bill

Link: Global race for 5G heats up with latest US Congress bill

“Prices vary widely across the United States but the average cost of installing equipment on a pole is around $2,000 per year. AT&T recently complained that it had received an estimate of $8,000 a year from a city in California. Even in low-cost Georgia, the local government felt it could get away with asking for $6,000 per pole per year…. There are roughly 350,000 base stations in the US and that number would likely have to quadruple (again, these are all rough figures) for 5G. So the annual cost of simply hosting 5G equipment is in the billions of dollars.”
Original source: Global race for 5G heats up with latest US Congress bill

Link: Heptio readies its customers and community for Kubernetes critical mass

Includes some packaging/pricing:

“HKS is offered in four tiers including Starter, with one supported configuration, unlimited tickets and up to 25 nodes; Professional, intended for organizations that are growing their deployments, with up to three supported configurations, unlimited tickets and up to 250 nodes; Enterprise, for large, mission-critical environments that covers up to five supported configurations, unlimited tickets and up to 750 nodes; and a Custom version, intended for the largest web-scale environments of more than 750 nodes. Pricing starts at $24,000 per year for the Starter tier.”
Original source: Heptio readies its customers and community for Kubernetes critical mass

Costs that go into a $185 shirt, including snacks & other human affordances

At a fast-fashion retailer such as H&M, a simple cut-and-sew top can cost as little as $15. At Gap, something similar might run about $45. At Elizabeth Suzann, a small fashion label based in Nashville, Tennessee, one of the brand’s minimal kimono-sleeved t-shirts, made of cotton twill, is $140.

This seems like the kind of analysis that’ll be handy in the up-coming trade wars.

Link

When to go private cloud

As represented with the star in the map above, according to CPI data, at labor efficiency of 1,000 VMs per engineer and 66% utilization, these enterprises are poised to beat public cloud on price regardless of whether they use a commercial orchestration software package, an OpenStack distribution or the OpenStack source.

And, on IaaS pricing:

But price still does matter: In a 451 Research custom study commissioned by Microsoft earlier this year, the biggest reason to change primary provider was price, cited by 34% of respondents. Consumers don’t necessarily want the cheapest cloud service, but they don’t want to feel ripped off. If there is a cheaper option elsewhere, it appears end users will take it into consideration.

Announcements on price cuts gather attention, and are a great publicity and discussion tool for service providers. We think cloud prices will continue to come down through 2017, and may spread beyond virtual machines into object storage, and perhaps even databases – virtual machines came down 7% globally in 2015, but the cost of our small application only came down 2.4%. The fact that margins are still healthy suggests providers aren’t sacrificing huge amounts of gross margin to give such cuts. If they are, it might be a few nickels and dimes here and there, but it’s more likely that they are reducing costs through better procurement and management. If we are in a cloud price war, we’ve yet to see it really get off the ground.

And, see more commentary on the topic of IaaS pricing.

Source: Cloud gross margins: The price war has yet to really kick off

Public cloud by the minute

Google is able to automatically reward end users a discount for loyalty through a sustained-use pricing scheme – the company claims its method for high utilization means reservations do not hugely benefit them, and so it would rather reward users for loyalty rather than for paying up front and forecasting capacity. Google also offers a per-minute billing model (as opposed to per-hour offers from many providers), and this advantage can also be attributed in part to containers. However, as we show, the benefit of per-minute billing only becomes important when workloads are very bursty.

Source: Google economics: Containers are the key