[Link] The Capitol mob desecrated a historical workplace — and left behind some disturbing artifacts

Many members of the Capitol’s janitorial staff are people of color, and it did not go unnoticed by people scrolling through photos of the destruction online that Black and Latino custodians — plus one first-generation Korean American congressman — were the ones picking up a mess left behind by a mostly White group that included, among others, a man carrying a gigantic Confederate flag.

Original source: The Capitol mob desecrated a historical workplace — and left behind some disturbing artifacts

[Link] Law and disorder: Republicans react to Donald Trump

Mr Trump’s media cheerleaders, all law-and-order obsessives, may find it hard to dismiss Wednesday’s images from the Capitol. Middle America dislikes mob violence and cherishes the symbols of its democracy. The Republicans lost support after Timothy McVeigh blew up a federal building in Oklahoma City, killing 168 people, in 1995. The parallel is inexact, but indicates how far Mr Trump and his MAGA shocktroops appear to have overstepped.

Original source: Law and disorder: Republicans react to Donald Trump

[Link] How to be less full of shit

Predictions can be used to express hopes, which are not actually “predictions”:

But that really is my main takeaway from the study of predictions: don’t predict so much stuff! Predictions are commonly used as one form or another of bad faith rhetorical device in punditry. People predict doom for politicians as a way of saying they don’t like them or predict failure of political tactics as a way of saying they don’t approve of them. Or they’ll issue dire prophecies of doom as a way of saying they want to get people more concerned. This encourages sloppy thinking. And its alarm-raising form is particularly harmful. If you think back to January 2020 it was perfectly reasonable to think the new virus in Wuhan wouldn’t become a global pandemic. But a 15 percent chance of a global pandemic is really bad! We need people to be able to discuss moderately improbable bad events without sounding like the boy who cried wolf.

Original source: How to be less full of shit

[Link] Scoring points by being cynical

Basically, the understanding is that whoever can paint the darkest possible portrait of the status quo is the one who is showing the most commitment to the cause. And you see this norm at work across climate change, health care, criminal justice reform, the economy, and everything else. If you’re not saying the sky is falling, that shows you don’t really care. A true comrade in the struggle would deny that any progress has been made or insist that any good news is trivial.

I tend to think this approach to politics is counterproductive — it’s psychologically and emotionally exhausting, out of touch with people’s lived experience of the world, and ultimately demoralizing and un-motivating.

Original source: Scoring points by being cynical

Link: Low Barr: Don’t give me that crap about security, just put the backdoors in the encryption, roars US Attorney General

Like the Obama administration before it, today’s White House has made backdooring encryption a priority, and legislation is reportedly being prepared to enforce it. Barr promised that FBI Director Chris Wray will give another speech on the topic later this week at the same conference. It looks like the encryption wars are back on.

Source: Low Barr: Don’t give me that crap about security, just put the backdoors in the encryption, roars US Attorney General

Link: Europe and America must work to stop their relationship unravelling

Yet, through its many ups and downs, the relationship has proved resilient. Trade flows between the eu and the United States remain the world’s biggest, worth more than $3bn a day. Shared democratic values, though wobbly in places, are a force for freedom. And, underpinning everything, the alliance provides stability in the face of a variety of threats, from terrorism to an aggressive Russia, that have given the alliance a new salience.

At the heart of this security partnership is nato. By reaching its 70th birthday the alliance stands out as a survivor—in the past five centuries the average lifespan for collective-defence alliances is just 15 years. Even as European leaders wonder how long they can rely on America, the relationship on the ground is thriving. As our special report this week explains, this is thanks to nato’s ability to change. No one imagined that the alliance’s Article 5 mutual-defence pledge would be invoked for the first, and so far only, time in response to a terrorist attack on America, in September 2001, or that Estonians, Latvians and Poles would be among nato members to suffer casualties in Afghanistan. Since 2014 the allies have responded vigorously to Russia’s annexation of Ukraine. They have increased defence spending, moved multinational battlegroups into the Baltic states and Poland, set ambitious targets for military readiness and conducted their biggest exercises since the cold war.

Source: Europe and America must work to stop their relationship unravelling

Link: Exclusive poll: America sours on social media giants

About 40% of Americans still feel that social media is a net positive for society. Overall, 65% of people say smartphones have made their quality of life better.

And people are concerned about misinformation in THE SOCIAL.
Original source: Exclusive poll: America sours on social media giants

Link: Software was important, but civics hacking is the real enabler

Techmeme’s summary is all you need to read:

Three recent books argue that big tech became powerful not because of “software disruption” but by ducking regulation, squeezing workers, strangling competitors
Original source: Software was important, but civics hacking is the real enabler

Link: The My Health Record story no politician should miss

“Early signs of Alzheimer’s disease or other forms of dementia would mean the end of a political career, perhaps rightly so. But with all the taboos still surrounding mental health, signs of less dramatic conditions could be used as political leverage. A prescription for an anti-psychotic medication, say, or even just a series of appointments with a psychiatrist known to specialise in these disorders. The timing of medical treatment can also reveal politically problematic patterns of activity. Prescriptions for erectile dysfunction pills would be perfectly reasonable for a male in his 60s or beyond, although they’d doubtless trigger embarrassing comments about flaccid policies. But what if the politician was married, the prescriptions were always in the weeks before overseas missions, and after the last such trip there was a series of weekly visits to a sexual health clinic? Infidelity can kill a career.”
Original source: The My Health Record story no politician should miss

Link: The My Health Record story no politician should miss

“Early signs of Alzheimer’s disease or other forms of dementia would mean the end of a political career, perhaps rightly so. But with all the taboos still surrounding mental health, signs of less dramatic conditions could be used as political leverage. A prescription for an anti-psychotic medication, say, or even just a series of appointments with a psychiatrist known to specialise in these disorders. The timing of medical treatment can also reveal politically problematic patterns of activity. Prescriptions for erectile dysfunction pills would be perfectly reasonable for a male in his 60s or beyond, although they’d doubtless trigger embarrassing comments about flaccid policies. But what if the politician was married, the prescriptions were always in the weeks before overseas missions, and after the last such trip there was a series of weekly visits to a sexual health clinic? Infidelity can kill a career.”
Original source: The My Health Record story no politician should miss

Link: How Tech Companies Conquered America’s Cities

“But what Uber lacked in political support it made up for in local popularity. Through its app, the company had a direct connection to thousands of riders and drivers who were making a living from its service.”
Original source: How Tech Companies Conquered America’s Cities

Link: Amy Chozick’s book is about Hillary Clinton — and all the things reporters don’t write in their stories about Hillary Clinton

“I think her career is going to be such a symbol of how we viewed powerful women in this period of American history, that it’s going to be incredibly important and studied for decades,” she said. “The fact the last chapter of her political career was up against this candidate who was bragging about sexually assaulting women, and had a known history of insulting women, it was such a confluence of forces.”
Original source: Amy Chozick’s book is about Hillary Clinton — and all the things reporters don’t write in their stories about Hillary Clinton

Link: Marco’s makeover

I’m shocked, shocked that only stock buy-backs are occurring! (Oh, thank you for my dividend):

‘“There is still a lot of thinking on the right that if big corporations are happy, they’re going to take the money they’re saving and reinvest it in American workers,” he says. “In fact they bought back shares, a few gave out bonuses; there’s no evidence whatsoever that the money’s been massively poured back into the American worker.”’
Original source: Marco’s makeover

Link: HPE Denies It’s Partnering with Huawei, Taps Crisis Public Relati

It’s hard to be Huawei in the US already, and under Trump it must be unbearable. Meanwhile, I hear they’re sucking up marketshare elsewhere.
Original source: HPE Denies It’s Partnering with Huawei, Taps Crisis Public Relati

Link: Trump’s Tariff Plan Leaves Blue-Collar Winners and Losers

“The mills and smelters that supply the raw material, and that would directly benefit from the tariffs, have been shrinking for years. Today, those industries employ fewer than 200,000 people. The companies that buy steel and aluminum, to make everything from trucks to chicken coops, employ more than 6.5 million workers, according to a Heritage Foundation analysis of Commerce Department data.”

Trade is hard.
Original source: Trump’s Tariff Plan Leaves Blue-Collar Winners and Losers