Link: Why Mexico has not become more prosperous—and how it could

“In other words, workers end up in jobs where they are less productive than they might be. Too many individuals who should be workers become entrepreneurs or are self-employed. Efficient businesses are taxed and penalised, while subsidies help sustain unproductive ones. Joseph Schumpeter’s notion of “creative destruction”, in which capitalist competition drives out weaker firms and rewards stronger ones, is paralleled in Mexico by “destructive creation”, quips Mr Levy, in which the environment favours the entry and survival of weak businesses that hinder the growth of stronger ones.”

I don’t understand any of the economic jibber-jabber in there, but I like a food “big systems and complicated” story.
Original source: Why Mexico has not become more prosperous—and how it could

Link: Government services must go digital, lawmakers urge in new bill

“The bill text points to an Internal Revenue Service report in which the agency shares that, for the fiscal 2014, live assistance cost between $42 and $53 per inbound correspondence. Digital transactions in the same time period, in contrast, cost the IRS just $0.22.”
Original source: Government services must go digital, lawmakers urge in new bill

Link: Government services must go digital, lawmakers urge in new bill

“The bill text points to an Internal Revenue Service report in which the agency shares that, for the fiscal 2014, live assistance cost between $42 and $53 per inbound correspondence. Digital transactions in the same time period, in contrast, cost the IRS just $0.22.”
Original source: Government services must go digital, lawmakers urge in new bill

Link: To Build a More Capable Cyber Policy Field, Teach Policy to Technologists

If you want to change government with IT, first make sure you understand how government works before you go and try to debug and refactor it.
Original source: To Build a More Capable Cyber Policy Field, Teach Policy to Technologists

Link: To Build a More Capable Cyber Policy Field, Teach Policy to Technologists

If you want to change government with IT, first make sure you understand how government works before you go and try to debug and refactor it.
Original source: To Build a More Capable Cyber Policy Field, Teach Policy to Technologists

Trumponomics: focusing on weird things with a small staff

From The Economist a few weeks back:

The real difference is that Trumponomics (unlike, say, Reaganomics) is not an economic doctrine at all. It is best seen as a set of proposals put together by businessmen courtiers for their king. Mr Trump has listened to scores of executives, but there are barely any economists in the White House. His approach to the economy is born of a mindset where deals have winners and losers and where canny negotiators confound abstract principles. Call it boardroom capitalism.

And, on trade, where history points towards a more open approach being successful:

Contrary to the Trump team’s assertions, there is little evidence that either the global trading system or individual trade deals have been systematically biased against America. Instead, America’s trade deficit—Mr Trump’s main gauge of the unfairness of trade deals—is better understood as the gap between how much Americans save and how much they invest. The fine print of trade deals is all but irrelevant. Textbooks predict that Mr Trump’s plans to boost domestic investment will probably lead to larger trade deficits, as it did in the Reagan boom of the 1980s. If so, Mr Trump will either need to abandon his measure of fair trade or, more damagingly, try to curb deficits by using protectionist tariffs that will hurt growth and sow mistrust around the world.

Meanwhile, by the numbers, the focus is obviously on the wrong sectors for juicing:

A deeper problem is that Trumponomics draws on a blinkered view of America’s economy. Mr Trump and his advisers are obsessed with the effect of trade on manufacturing jobs, even though manufacturing employs only 8.5% of America’s workers and accounts for only 12% of GDP. Service industries barely seem to register. This blinds Trumponomics to today’s biggest economic worry: the turbulence being created by new technologies. Yet technology, not trade, is ravaging American retailing, an industry that employs more people than manufacturing. And economic nationalism will speed automation: firms unable to outsource jobs to Mexico will stay competitive by investing in machines at home. Productivity and profits may rise, but this may not help the less-skilled factory workers who Mr Trump claims are his priority.

Check out the rest: “Courting trouble”.