🗂 Link: VMware Modernizes Its Approach to Kubernetes, Increasing Its Appeal to Developers and DevOps

36% of developers cited “resource allocation and management” as their chief impediment to productivity, while 34% cited the “lack of automated collaboration between software developers and IT operations.”

Source: VMware Modernizes Its Approach to Kubernetes, Increasing Its Appeal to Developers and DevOps

Link: The platform play: How to operate like a tech company

One of the global leading banks created about 30 platforms. One such platform was payments, which consisted of more than 60 applications that previously had been managed independently from each other. The top team decided to bring the 300-plus IT people working on development and maintenance of payments together with the corresponding people on the business side. Under joint business/IT leadership, this entity was empowered to move quickly on priority business initiatives, to modernize the IT structure, and to allocate the resources to make that happen.

The team shifted its working model and started running the payments platform as an internal business that served all the different parts of the bank (think payments as a service). This approach made it clear where to focus specific tech interventions: removal of nonstrategic IT applications; modernization and accelerated shift of the target applications into the cloud; connectivity to enable swapping solutions in or out easily; and, most important, a major step-up in feature/solution development for the internal business clients. This platform-based way of running the business was then progressively rolled out across the group. Prioritization is set by the top team (because empowerment does not mean anarchy), and all IT interventions are run the same way, to ensure consistency and replicability.

Their notion of a platform is more like the old API economy thing:

A platform-based company will have 20 to 40 platforms, each big enough to provide an important and discrete service but small enough to be manageable. To simplify platform management, it helps to group them into three broad areas: customer journeys, business capabilities, and core IT capabilities (Exhibit 1).

For example, in personal banking, the customer-journey platforms cover the customer experiences of searching, opening an account, getting a mortgage, and so on. The business-capability platforms deliver the banking solutions, such as payments and credit analytics, and the support capabilities, such as employee-pension management, visual dashboarding, and management information systems (MIS). Finally, the core IT platforms provide the shared technology on which the journeys and business capabilities run, such as the cloud platform, the data analytics environment, and the set of IT connectivity solutions.

Source: The platform play: How to operate like a tech company

Link: How Air France – KLM designed its PaaS Cloud Foundry

“it was not a question of replacing our experts but of increasing the skills of the group’s internal teams,” says Thierry Morcq.

(Translated with Google Translate.)
Original source: How Air France – KLM designed its PaaS Cloud Foundry

Link: HSBC chief architect: Why machine learning is accelerating cloud adoption

If you build it, you own it, big data ed.:

“We got some value out of that but to be honest we found it hard to keep on top of, just hard to build skills at the pace required to integrate new technologies,” Knott says.

“No matter how hard we ran there is always something new coming in that we wanted to get access to, but we couldn’t get there quite fast enough to have really finished deploying what we were deploying previously.

“So it was hard to manage, hard to keep on top of, and also hard to scale. We had reasonable success but we were having these challenges.””

Original source: HSBC chief architect: Why machine learning is accelerating cloud adoption

Link: Mesosphere revenue, etc.

“Last year in Q4 we issued news about hitting a $50m+ run rate and this year’s Q2 marks our biggest quarter ever, beating our numbers over the last 14 quarters. In fact, according to a recent report from Inc, we are the third fastest-growing software company in the U.S. with a revenue growth of 7,507 percent.”
Original source: Mesosphere revenue, etc.

Link: Why You Need To Know About Low-Code, Even If You’re Not Responsible For Software Delivery

“Low-code [uses] declarative techniques instead of traditional lines of programming… Common features include reusable components, drag-and-drop tools, & process modeling. Individuals or small teams can experiment, prototype, & deliver apps in days or weeks.” Plus, marketsizing: something like $4bn.

Original source: Why You Need To Know About Low-Code, Even If You’re Not Responsible For Software Delivery

Link: Why You Need To Know About Low-Code, Even If You’re Not Responsible For Software Delivery

“Low-code [uses] declarative techniques instead of traditional lines of programming… Common features include reusable components, drag-and-drop tools, & process modeling. Individuals or small teams can experiment, prototype, & deliver apps in days or weeks.” Plus, marketsizing: something like $4bn.

Original source: Why You Need To Know About Low-Code, Even If You’re Not Responsible For Software Delivery

Link: Red Hat’s James Talks About the Importance of Open Source Innovat

People always want MSPs is to add higher level services, to become more like public cloud. Also, some arch open source/lock-in talk.
Original source: Red Hat’s James Talks About the Importance of Open Source Innovat

Link: Red Hat’s James Talks About the Importance of Open Source Innovat

People always want MSPs is to add higher level services, to become more like public cloud. Also, some arch open source/lock-in talk.
Original source: Red Hat’s James Talks About the Importance of Open Source Innovat

Link: Embracing Kubernetes Doesn’t Have to Mean OPERATING Kubernetes – Container Solutions

“You can now embrace Kubernetes without managing all the pain yourself. AKS going GA yesterday was the trigger: now, all three major cloud providers offer production-ready managed Kubernetes services. Businesses may now run Kubernetes on the cloud of their choice, without needing to install, operate, and maintain their own Kubernetes management infrastructure.”
Original source: Embracing Kubernetes Doesn’t Have to Mean OPERATING Kubernetes – Container Solutions

Link: Full Cycle Developers at Netflix

How Netflix thinks about standardized platforms and tools, plus their adaptation of DevOps and SRE.

“Full cycle developers apply engineering discipline to all areas of the life cycle. They evaluate problems from a developer perspective and ask questions like “how can I automate what is needed to operate this system?” and “what self-service tool will enable my partners to answer their questions without needing me to be involved?” This helps our teams scale by favoring systems-focused rather than humans-focused thinking and automation over manual approaches.”
Original source: Full Cycle Developers at Netflix

Link: CoreOS Is New Linux, Not A RHEL Classic Killer

‘Importantly, the OpenShift platform cloud software, which included Red Hat’s own implementation of the Kubernetes container controller, will be deployable on either the full-on Red Hat Enterprise Linux in pets mode or the minimalist Red Hat CoreOS in cattle mode. But it will be using the Tectonic version of the Kubernetes controller going forward as well as integrating the Prometheus monitoring tool and etcd for storing telemetry. Gracely tells The Next Platform that the implementation of Kubernetes had outside dependencies such as the CloudForms hybrid cloud management tool (formerly ManageIQ) and was not “native” to Kubernetes in the same way that Tectonic is, meaning free of outside dependenies.’
Original source: CoreOS Is New Linux, Not A RHEL Classic Killer

Link: CIOs Must Use EAs To Be Successful In Their Digital Transformations

“Developing a portfolio of architecture products to articulate the firm’s enterprise architecture. DevOps and business product managers have become very skilled in product management. However, it has been difficult to link business and technology products in a meaningful way. EAs have productized architectural components — customer journeys, value streams, and life cycles — as a tool to bridge this gap and align business products, architectural products, and technology products to strategy.”
Original source: CIOs Must Use EAs To Be Successful In Their Digital Transformations

Link: My Interoperable Opinions of Cloud Foundry Summit 2018

“[I]n my previous life working in IT, I’ll admit I wasn’t in the opinionated camp. I didn’t even understand it as a concept. I generally went for selecting software with the ultimate flexibility. What I didn’t realize was how often this led to analysis paralysis and decreased productivity.”

I remember one of the last projects I worked on. We were selecting a software product for financial planning and reporting. Ideally, we’d have found a solution that did 80% of what was required. We should have reevaluated the actual importance of the other 20% we thought we needed. Instead, we focused on that 20% until we settled on something that could handle it. Then implementation details, changing requirements, and complex technology got in the way anyway. As I recently heard one industry analyst say, “Choice is not a differentiator.”
Original source: My Interoperable Opinions of Cloud Foundry Summit 2018

Link: The Contradictions Of IBM’s Platform Strategy

“IBM is a systems company with a very large portion of its revenues and an even larger part of its profits coming from these two platforms, the System z mainframe and the Power Systems – now sometimes called the Cognitive Systems – line. The core systems business – meaning the servers, storage, and networking hardware and the operating systems and transaction processing software plus any financing needed for it – comprises about a third of IBM’s revenues and more than half of its gross profits, by our estimates. Various database and middleware stacks up on top of this, generating even more platform revenues and profits, but this is tougher to peel away.”
Original source: The Contradictions Of IBM’s Platform Strategy

Link: The Contradictions Of IBM’s Platform Strategy

“IBM is a systems company with a very large portion of its revenues and an even larger part of its profits coming from these two platforms, the System z mainframe and the Power Systems – now sometimes called the Cognitive Systems – line. The core systems business – meaning the servers, storage, and networking hardware and the operating systems and transaction processing software plus any financing needed for it – comprises about a third of IBM’s revenues and more than half of its gross profits, by our estimates. Various database and middleware stacks up on top of this, generating even more platform revenues and profits, but this is tougher to peel away.”
Original source: The Contradictions Of IBM’s Platform Strategy

Link: The Platform Matters More Than Ever, The Operating System Less So

“Windows Server 2019 is a case in point, and going through the highlights shows it. Back in the day, when a new Windows Server release came out, everyone was obsessed about its scalability and reliability and how it compared to alternatives such IBM i, a slew of Unix variants (including IBM’s own AIX), and the IBM mainframe platforms: VSE, OS/390, and VM. We all dug through the manuals to see how many processors or cores or threads it could span, how much memory it could address, what the impact of SMP or NUMA clustering was on performance, how the I/O was architected to match whatever new gizmos were on the PCI-Express bus. No one really worries about these things. It is a given that any operating system will exploit hardware, and that most hardware is more than enough for most customers. This is not just an IBM i thing. Certain customers, to be sure, can make use of as many cores Intel can cram into a two-socket server, but for most companies, they are nowhere near the top bin parts and they have much less capable processors running at a lot lower cost and with plenty of excess capacity. It doesn’t matter if it is Windows Server or Linux. The basic workhorse server does not look that different from a Power8 or Power9 machine, and in many IBM i shops, there is far less compute dedicated to IBM i on a single instance than on a Windows Server or Linux machine. The database jobs that most IBM i shops have are fairly modest.”
Original source: The Platform Matters More Than Ever, The Operating System Less So