🗂 Link: Waity K8-y no more Pivotal: We’ll unhook Application Service from VMware

“The urgency was more around understanding the long term vision than an immediate need,” said Andrews. “We’re still very early. Everybody is talking about K8s all the time, but if you look at who is actually using it in production, the list is much shorter. Our technology stack works incredibly well, we have customers with over 100,000 containers working on the current platform. If we forecast out 3 to 5 years in the future though, it seems clear that K8s is going to be a de facto component in the architecture.”

Source: Waity K8-y no more Pivotal: We’ll unhook Application Service from VMware

🗂 Link: Pat Gelsinger and his calculated plan for VMware

“Three years ago, your biggest risk was cloud; six years ago, your biggest risk was Open Stack. If you look at it now, you can clearly say, ‘Hey, these next-generation applications, are you going to be the enterprise supplier of choice?’. So in that sense, I think we had a bit of defensive risk … our platform was at risk.

“At the same time, if you look at the dollars, the business value at play in the developer layer — a lot of money there. It’s a very rich, offensive opportunity as well — both defense and offense — and if we expand the value proposition for all of the VMware operators today, to be able to effectively reach the developers and the application in a much more effective way than they do today … if we can bring those worlds together, that’s a pretty huge benefit for our customers as well.”

Source: Pat Gelsinger and his calculated plan for VMware

Link: Pivotal Cloud Foundry 2.5, Now GA, Harnesses the Power of Istio and Envoy to Make Your Developers More Productive

Whole lotta features:

> – Weighted routing uses Istio and Envoy to simplify blue-green deployments (beta)
> – Platform Automation for PCF, the engine of your perpetual upgrade machine (beta)
> – Windows Server 2019, Microsoft’s most container-friendly OS yet, now powers PAS for Windows (coming soon)
> – Consume upstream Kubernetes your way with the new PKS family
> – Got apps that need multiple custom ports? Run ‘em on PAS.
> – Use metadata on API resources throughout PAS to share context
> – Keep tabs on all your apps, wherever they run with multi-foundation Apps Manager (coming soon)
> – Steeltoe 2.2 improves the stability of your microservices, simplifies connections to MongoDB
> – Spring Cloud Data Flow for PCF 1.4: Wire up data pipelines across Kubernetes and Cloud Foundry (coming soon)
> – Single Sign-On for PCF 1.9 will help you get more done faster with a new, streamlined dashboard (coming soon)
> – Detecting manifest changes with Ops Manager is much easier
> – Other Enhancements
> – Public Service Announcements
> – Try Pivotal Cloud Foundry for Free

Source: Pivotal Cloud Foundry 2.5, Now GA, Harnesses the Power of Istio and Envoy to Make Your Developers More Productive

Why Wells Fargo Wants to ‘Repave’ Its Platform Every Day

Wells Fargo, explains how the company is combating advanced persistent threats, as well as an onslaught of CVEs, by repaving its entire platform multiple times per week — with a goal of doing so every day by the end of 2019.

That is, they rebuild production three times a week, probably now more.

Source: Why Wells Fargo Wants to ‘Repave’ Its Platform Every Day

Link: How Air France – KLM designed its PaaS Cloud Foundry

“it was not a question of replacing our experts but of increasing the skills of the group’s internal teams,” says Thierry Morcq.

(Translated with Google Translate.)
Original source: How Air France – KLM designed its PaaS Cloud Foundry

Link: Cyber Airmen fuel innovation

Any problems discovered in the software can be more easily corrected, a small failure being preferable to correcting the shortfalls of an entire software suite. Changes requested by the customer can sometimes be delivered in just a couple days.

Prior to Jigsaw, the tanker mission planners would use whiteboards to plot out their fueling rendezvous.

“Rather than taking hours to run the calculations by hand for the hundreds of sorties scheduled each day to find a feasible plan,” Tatro said. “The program logs events in order to detect and report errors in scheduling.”

It didn’t take long for the new software to start paying off.

“Before Jigsaw was delivered to the tanker planners, they would be spending 8 to 12 hours a day with a team of five planning a day of tanker missions,” Maung said. “Now they only need three people and it takes them 4 to 5 hours, usually done before lunch.”

Since the program was put into use in April 2017, Jigsaw has saved approximately $200,000 per day, just in fuel. There were other benefits as well.
Original source: Cyber Airmen fuel innovation

Link: Pivotal and New Relic Deliver Visibility, Value, and Velocity

A nice listing of some metrics to monitor out of the box in PCF, and just performance metrics, but meatware and product related stuff too.
Original source: Pivotal and New Relic Deliver Visibility, Value, and Velocity

Link: Pivotal Cloud Foundry 2.3

A laundry list of new feature and services in the software I market around. There’s a lot of .Net expansion, adding some standard platform services (like a task scheduler), and Morlock stuff like multi-install (would you say “zone”?) OpenStack, and Kubernetes and embedded OS update:
Original source: Pivotal Cloud Foundry 2.3

Link: How Companies are Saving Millions with Pivotal Cloud Foundry

“A recent Forrester study commissioned by Pivotal which analyzed the benefits PCF customers see when adopting the platform found that developers gain 50 percent more coding hours a week. How? The automation and self-service features of Pivotal Cloud Foundry decrease manual and mundane deployment tasks. Wait times for environment setup and code to be prompted to production are also significantly reduced… That 50 percent gain in coding hours led to more releases per year, speeding up release schedules from once every two months to once a week — and sometimes even daily. Forrester estimates this increase in productivity equates to more than $31 million over three years, while the reduction in DevOps time allocated to provisioning, patching and scaling across multiple clouds at almost $6 million.”

Also, Rackspace has a managed Pivotal Cloud Foundry service.
Original source: How Companies are Saving Millions with Pivotal Cloud Foundry

Link: Dell EMC Merger Required Its Own Digital Transformation Program

“It was not like we went from three days to two days to one day. We went from three days to 18 minutes immediately. It was like flipping a light switch.”
Original source: Dell EMC Merger Required Its Own Digital Transformation Program

Link: Innovation at the edge: the top air defence trends by domain

“Software company Pivotal, backed by Dell EMC, VMWare, GE, Microsoft and Ford, has developed a tanker refuelling solution for the USAF with the US Defense Innovation Unit Experimental (DIUx); Running on the firm’s Pivotal Cloud Foundry platform, the software solution was built for under $2m in 90 days and is now being used in operational areas including Qatar. It currently saves the US Air Force $1 million per day in fuel costs, with the software being managed by just one person. It also aligns with USAF’s Air Operations Centre (AOC) capabilities via a continuous delivery software development pipeline to a hybrid cloud-based platform alongside the legacy AOC 10.1 system.”
Original source: Innovation at the edge: the top air defence trends by domain

Link: Innovation at the edge: the top air defence trends by domain

“Software company Pivotal, backed by Dell EMC, VMWare, GE, Microsoft and Ford, has developed a tanker refuelling solution for the USAF with the US Defense Innovation Unit Experimental (DIUx); Running on the firm’s Pivotal Cloud Foundry platform, the software solution was built for under $2m in 90 days and is now being used in operational areas including Qatar. It currently saves the US Air Force $1 million per day in fuel costs, with the software being managed by just one person. It also aligns with USAF’s Air Operations Centre (AOC) capabilities via a continuous delivery software development pipeline to a hybrid cloud-based platform alongside the legacy AOC 10.1 system.”
Original source: Innovation at the edge: the top air defence trends by domain

Link: CF Summit Boston — Day 2 Wrap-Up – Brian McClain – Medium

In their PCF setup, T-Mobile has only 10 operators supporting 18,000 containers doing 10,000 transactions/second. This is spread over 1,700 developers. So:

“T-Mobile reports a 170:1 developer to operator ratio.”
Original source: CF Summit Boston — Day 2 Wrap-Up – Brian McClain – Medium

Link: Merrill Corporation alongside Leading Technology Companies, Launch New Category for M&A Professionals

“Merrill uses MongoDB technology to build horizontal applications on top of four key pillars: a secure repository, document collaboration, data and machine learning as well as analytics. Pivotal Cloud Foundry is used across all engineering stages – development, testing and production – with a focus on maximizing the microservices infrastructure that arranges the application into a suite of independently deployable, modular services. For security, identity and storage components Merrill DatasiteOne uses Microsoft Azure Key Vault, Azure Active Directory and Azure Storage.”
Original source: Merrill Corporation alongside Leading Technology Companies, Launch New Category for M&A Professionals

Link: VMware and Pivotal’s PKS Distribution Marries Kubernetes with BOSH

“When we look at differentiators, I would say that there are a few and NSX-T, which provides east-west micro-segmentation of traffic between two VMs within the same network, is one of the strongest differentiators. BOSH is also a strong differentiator as well, in terms of offering self-healing capabilities. But being able to integrate with VMware tools is one of the key differentiators,” said Dul.
Original source: VMware and Pivotal’s PKS Distribution Marries Kubernetes with BOSH

Link: Comparing Kubernetes to Pivotal Cloud Foundry — A Developer’s Perspective

Exactly what it says. The install and ops experiences are not covered, of course.
Original source: Comparing Kubernetes to Pivotal Cloud Foundry — A Developer’s Perspective

Pacing cloud-native transformation, and actually doing the work to increase productivity

I like to tell large organizations that compared to the break-neck pace of “the silicon valley mindset,” they can operate at a leisurely pace. That pace is usually fast for these enterprises, but their problem set and risk profile is a lot different than hats on cats. Abby has a nice, short write-up that hits on this topic among others:

By the end of his first year, Safford and his teams had built prototypes and market tests and finished 16 new software projects.

At Home Depot, they were at about 140 to 150 projects after a year or so. However, it’s common in the first year to do a lot of replatforming of “simple,” mostly cloud-native compatible apps in there. You can do these at a pretty fast clip, with the rule of thumb being 10 apps in 10 weeks. This is in addition to new applications, but explains high numbers like those at Home Depot. I suspect the Allstate numbers are mostly net-new apps, though.

Goals:

Safford’s eventual goal is to shift Allstate software development to 70 percent extreme agile programming and 30 percent traditional scrum and waterfall. Where developers used to spend only 20 percent of their time coding software, today up to 90 percent of their days are spent programming. Each of his CompoZed development labs around the world has the same startup look and feel, including scooters parked in the hallways. This is not your grandfather’s insurance company anymore.

What you hear over and over again from organizations going cloud-native is that developers were spending lots of time in meetings, checking email, and otherwise not coding (and, yes, by “coding” I don’t mean just recklessly LOC‘ing it up without design, and all that). Management had to spend much effort to get them back to coding.

As I fecklessly tell my seven year old when he’s struggling with homework: the only way to finish this quickly is to actually do the work.

(Also: nice write-up from Abby!)

Source: Don’t Forget People and Process in Your Digital Transformation