Link: Will UK lose global business and tech leader status post-Brexit?

‘James Governor, Analyst at RedMonk said: “Brexit will be the biggest systemic shock to British business in the more than 70 years. The scale of change will require an unprecedented investment in IT, with in-house application development becoming more important than ever to deal with complexity.”’
Original source: Will UK lose global business and tech leader status post-Brexit?

Link: Brexit could see UK lose status as global business leader

“The study also suggests that software might be the solution to these upcoming problems. Almost all (93 per cent) of CIOs and 84 per cent of ITDMs have said that the ability to create their own software is essential for preparing an organisation for the effects of Brexit.”
Original source: Brexit could see UK lose status as global business leader

Link: Start a nuclear war? There’s an app for that – US military teams up with Silicon Valley to revolutionise the battlefield

‘And they ended up saving $1million in fuel per week – but more importantly speeding up decision making when time is of essence. “We paired with them and we taught them this new way of building software and we built the software application side-by-side with them,” Mr Salisbury said.’
Original source: Start a nuclear war? There’s an app for that – US military teams up with Silicon Valley to revolutionise the battlefield

Link: VMware and Pivotal’s PKS Distribution Marries Kubernetes with BOSH

“When we look at differentiators, I would say that there are a few and NSX-T, which provides east-west micro-segmentation of traffic between two VMs within the same network, is one of the strongest differentiators. BOSH is also a strong differentiator as well, in terms of offering self-healing capabilities. But being able to integrate with VMware tools is one of the key differentiators,” said Dul.
Original source: VMware and Pivotal’s PKS Distribution Marries Kubernetes with BOSH

Link: Vendors talk about why AzureStack is good for their markets

This is especially true in “industrial Internet of Things” applications, where the likes of ABB and GE collect data from sensors on their equipment and analyze it to help with things like predictive maintenance and capacity planning. Often, for performance and/or security reasons, the compute gear that does the analytics is placed directly on oil rigs, power plants, factory floors, in mines, and so on. Sometimes it’s connected to the cloud, and sometimes it isn’t.

“The message from our customers was, ‘We will only start this journey with you if you can put all the infrastructure we need on our premises, isolated from the internet, so we can be assured of security, of governance, of adequate latency for decision making,’” Ciaran Flanagan, group VP and head of ABB’s Global Datacenter business, said. He predicted that for industrial IoT, between 60 percent and 70 percent of processing, transactions, and data management is going to happen at the edge.
Link to original

Link: Vendors talk about why AzureStack is good for their markets

This is especially true in “industrial Internet of Things” applications, where the likes of ABB and GE collect data from sensors on their equipment and analyze it to help with things like predictive maintenance and capacity planning. Often, for performance and/or security reasons, the compute gear that does the analytics is placed directly on oil rigs, power plants, factory floors, in mines, and so on. Sometimes it’s connected to the cloud, and sometimes it isn’t.

“The message from our customers was, ‘We will only start this journey with you if you can put all the infrastructure we need on our premises, isolated from the internet, so we can be assured of security, of governance, of adequate latency for decision making,’” Ciaran Flanagan, group VP and head of ABB’s Global Datacenter business, said. He predicted that for industrial IoT, between 60 percent and 70 percent of processing, transactions, and data management is going to happen at the edge.
Link to original