Telstra speeds up its release cycles with all the great cloud native stuff

According to Telstra, in some cases, its software development time has decreased from 6-8 months to 10-12 weeks through its work with Pivotal,

More on how widespread it is:

Telstra has moved 100 of its internal teams to Pivotal’s agile software development platform since partnering with the enterprise software company two years ago, with the telco saying this accounts for around 25 to 30 percent of its business.

Under the partnership, Telstra’s teams have been trained in Pivotal Labs to build software using agile methodologies on Pivotal Cloud Foundry, with an end goal of shifting 400 teams encompassing around 4,000 to 5,000 staff members to the cloud software-development platform.

Source: Telstra, Pivotal get up to speed with partnerhip

Stateless apps in one, stateful apps in the other

It happens to be the case that CF — because it’s an app platform and wants to let the user focus on their code — provides a way to convert code in to containers inside the platform without having to start messing around with Dockerfiles and the like. And this functionality even does some cool things for you like keeping your container OS automatically patched so you don’t have to build CI pipelines to monitor your base images and rebuild stuff.

That’s why I love Cloud Foundry’s Application Runtime. Of course, because of these constraints — the constraints that are why I love it — the App Runtime can’t possibly work for complex stateful services: the whole point is for it not to. And that’s why it’s fantastic that there’s now a Container Runtime (which I wish we’d called a Stateful Services Runtime because that’s how I think of it).

Source: CF vs Kube: Is the difference who creates the container?

Bloomberg on kubernetes in Cloud Foundry

On overview of how Bloomberg is looking at the likes of Pivotal Container Services:

“Many Kubernetes distributions are good on day one, when they’re first deployed,” said Andrey Rybka, technical architect in the office of the CTO at Bloomberg, the global finance, media and tech company based in New York. “But what happens on day two, when something fails? Kubernetes doesn’t [automatically] address things like failures at the physical node level.”

And:

The roadmap for Cloud Foundry Container Runtime includes support for stateful applications based on the StatefulSets feature that became available with Kubernetes 1.7 in June. The foundation also plans to integrate the Istio project, founded by IBM, Google and Lyft in May, which helps to manage network communications between microservices

Also, see coverage of the general announcement in TechCrunch, the related press release, and our discussion in this week’s podcast.

Source: Cloud Foundry Container Runtime eases Kubernetes ops

Pivotal Conversations: The Fat Baby in the Water: Cloud-Native Enterprise Architecture

Most DevOps people seem to think Enterprise Architects are on annoying uncle at Thanksgiving status. I’m not sure that’s exactly the case, but what an EA can do in a cloud-native organization isn’t exactly too well known and documented yet. This week Richard Seroter and I discuss the idea of a cloud-native architect.

Check it out in Soundcloud, and subscribe to the RSS feed.

Rackspace partners with Pivotal to launch managed services for Cloud Foundry

“Managed Pivotal Cloud Foundry is Rackspace’s first step into the managed platform space, as we move up the stack to solutions that customers want our help with,” wrote Brannon Lacey, vice president of applications and platforms at Rackspace, in today’s announcement. “It is a solution that helps customers get up and running on Pivotal Cloud Foundry quickly and stay up and running, with operational support and proactive monitoring. This way, in-house teams can focus on innovation and getting out to market quickly while Rackspace handles the backend.”

Source: Rackspace partners with Pivotal to launch managed services for Cloud Foundry, Frederic Lardinois, TechCrunch

Pivotal Conversations: It’s private cloud all over again

With no guest, this week Richard and I cover all sorts of things:

There’s some exciting private cloud news on the horizon with Microsoft’s Azure Stack coming out in September. We discuss the brief history of private cloud and several models people have tried, along with some other news from the infrastructure software world. With no guest, Richard and I discuss some projects we’re working from cloud-native .Net, enterprise integration, and enterprise architecture.

Check out the episode!

Pivotal Conversations: The management perspective on transforming Allstate, with Opal Perry

I’m always interested to hear how management manages to change how software is done in large organizations – it can seem impossible! As ever, Allstate provides a fascinating stream of information here, and I was lucky to get the chance to interview Opal Perry there on how Allstate has been doing with all that cloud-native stuff.

Check out the listing on SoundCloud, and be sure to subscribe to the podcast if you like it.

Also, if you want to hear more, Matthew Curry and I had a similar conversation a few weeks ago at OSCON.