🗂 Link: IBM i Clouds Proliferating At Rapid Clip – IT Jungle

“We partnered with Google because Google wanted to partner with us and Amazon didn’t want to partner with us,” IBM i Chief Architect Steve Will said during a panel discussion at the inaugural POWERUp conference in San Antonio, Texas, in June 2018. “So hey Google is going to succeed with Power. Now I have Amazon calling, asking us.”

Source: IBM i Clouds Proliferating At Rapid Clip – IT Jungle

Link: Microsoft, Red Hat Partner on OpenShift

The OpenShift-Azure deal extends collaboration between Microsoft and Red Hat that includes the addition of Microsoft SQL server on Red Hat Enterprise Linux. The deal signaled Microsoft’s embrace of OpenShift application container management.

The expanded partnership also gives OpenShift users access to public cloud services such as Azure Cosmos and SQL databases along with cloud-based machine learning models aimed at development of cloud-native enterprise applications.

OpenShift on Azure would “simplify container management on Kubernetes and help customers innovate on their cloud journeys,” added Scott Guthrie, executive vice president of Microsoft’s Cloud and AI Group.

Azure Red Hat OpenShift is available now on Microsoft Azure

Source: Microsoft, Red Hat Partner on OpenShift

Link: Salesforce makes undisclosed “strategic investment” in Docker, companies will cross-sell MuleSoft and Docker Enterprise

As part of the new relationship between the companies, Docker and Salesforce’s recently acquired MuleSoft division will cross-sell each other’s products when courting companies that are looking to modernize their software development organizations. The collaboration extends beyond that, however; the two companies will also do integration work aimed at helping mutual customers take advantage of their investments in one platform by extending capabilities to the other platform.
Original source: Salesforce makes undisclosed “strategic investment” in Docker, companies will cross-sell MuleSoft and Docker Enterprise

Link: Google Cloud Revenue

When asked about Google’s on-premises strategy, Pichai said the company is “thoughtfully looking at it,” and cited its partnerships with SAP, Pivotal, and VMware. Google also has a hybrid-cloud product with Cisco and its own Kubernetes-based GKE On Prem available to early access customers.

On-premises data centers remain “a big, big requirement for customers,” and these partnerships help Google address those companies’ needs, Pichai said. When it comes to hybrid cloud, “we are thinking about how to do that better,” Pichai said. “Our overall approach to cloud hybrid modernization I think is the right long-term direction and so we are doing that.”
Original source: Google Cloud Revenue

Link: Google Cloud Revenue

When asked about Google’s on-premises strategy, Pichai said the company is “thoughtfully looking at it,” and cited its partnerships with SAP, Pivotal, and VMware. Google also has a hybrid-cloud product with Cisco and its own Kubernetes-based GKE On Prem available to early access customers.

On-premises data centers remain “a big, big requirement for customers,” and these partnerships help Google address those companies’ needs, Pichai said. When it comes to hybrid cloud, “we are thinking about how to do that better,” Pichai said. “Our overall approach to cloud hybrid modernization I think is the right long-term direction and so we are doing that.”
Original source: Google Cloud Revenue

Link: Pivotal and New Relic Deliver Visibility, Value, and Velocity

A nice listing of some metrics to monitor out of the box in PCF, and just performance metrics, but meatware and product related stuff too.
Original source: Pivotal and New Relic Deliver Visibility, Value, and Velocity

Link: Google Banks on Kubernetes in Cloud Wars

Putting 3rd party middleware into Google Cloud:

“Among the commercial applications included in the marketplace are big data, database and machine learning applications along with developer tools. Meanwhile, open source applications range from WordPress and the Apache Cassandra NoSQL database to Apache Spark cluster computing.”
Original source: Google Banks on Kubernetes in Cloud Wars

Link: Microsoft sees Red …Hat for OpenShift-on-Azure public cloud offering

‘Rollout of the partnership will occur in two phases, with Azure support for OpenShift Container Platform and Red Hat Enterprise Linux on Azure and Azure Stack available now. The jointly managed OpenShift on Azure project is slated to go into its preview phase “in the coming months.”’
Original source: Microsoft sees Red …Hat for OpenShift-on-Azure public cloud offering

Link: Cisco is strengthening its ‘cloud first’ posture

Finally, an explanation of that Cisco/Google partnership:

“CloudCenter is key to the hybrid cloud partnership that Cisco and Google recently announced, where CloudCenter will be used to integrate Google Cloud Platform services with on-premises datacenters. The integrated offering includes Cisco’s Hyperflex hyperconverged infrastructure and Nexus 9k networking. Cisco is also leveraging its networking (CSR) and security (Stealthwatch Cloud) portfolio to ensure a consistent environment across the hybrid cloud. Google’s Kubernetes container runtime uses Apigee to consume and manage APIs, as well as Google’s range of cloud services, including machine learning and visual recognition. The open source Istio service management platform is key to the offering, supported in CloudCenter, providing traffic management, observability, policy enforcement and service identity and security for microservices. There will also be integrations to AppDynamics. Solution engineering efforts are underway, and Cisco and Google are working on predefined statements of work that can be executed by both companies’ direct sales teams and by the partner channels. The joint offering will be fully supported by the Cisco Technical Assistance Center. The Cisco-Google partnership on hybrid cloud is non-exclusive, but Google is working closely with Cisco on the joint engineering work around open hybrid cloud.”

Original source: Cisco is strengthening its ‘cloud first’ posture

Link: Datical cozies up to Pivotal for synchronized database updates

‘Datical automatically examines SQL scripts created by developers and aligns them with a common object model. “We create a package so you have an immutable artifact that goes from development to test to production just like your app code,” Reeves said. The software checks for inefficiencies, such as the use of multiple indices or joins, and flags them before changing the schema…. Datical’s containerized image can be run with Concourse as part of a testing pipeline to enable application development teams to push application and database changes through the release cycle at the same time. The company’s will cross-sell each other products, although the arrangement isn’t exclusive, Reeves said.’
Link to original

Better details on the Cisco/Google partnership around kubernetes and Istio

The cloud initiative combines Google’s de facto standard Kubernetes cluster orchestration platform for managing applications and services across hybrid infrastructure with Cisco’s networking and security expertise. It also leverages Cisco’s push into hyper-converged infrastructure. Along with extending security to application containers and other micro-services, the deal would allow users to monitor application behavior running on hybrid platforms, the partners said.

The other pillar of the collaboration is Istio, another open source tool released earlier this year to help manage micro-services via what developers call a “service mesh network.” Working with Kubernetes, Istio aims to provide a uniform means of connecting and managing micro-services.

And, more here:

The companies will offer the joint solution to a limited number of customers during the first part of 2018 with generally availability coming later in the year.

Source: Cisco, Google Join Forces on Hybrid Cloud

What’s in Microsoft Azure Stack

Some BOM’ing of Azure Stack:

Azure Stack is made of two basic components, the underlying infrastructure that customers purchase from one of Microsoft’s certified partners (initially Dell EMC, HPE and Lenovo) and software that is licensed from Microsoft.The software includes basic IaaS functions that make up a cloud, such as virtual machines, storage and virtual networking. Azure Stack includes some platform-as-a-service (PaaS) application-development features including the Azure Container Service and Microsoft’s Azure Functions serverless computing software, plus MySQL and SQL Server support. It comes with Azure Active Directory for user authentication.Customers also have access to a wide range of third-party apps from the Azure Marketplace, including OS images from companies like Red Hat and SuSE, and templates that can be installed to run programs like Cloud Foundry, Kubernetes and Mesosphere.On the hardware side, Azure Stack runs on a hyperconverged infrastructure stack that Microsoft and its hardware vendors have certified. The smallest production-level Azure Stack deployment is a four-server rack with three physical switches and a lifecycle management server host. Individual racks can scale up to 12 servers, and eventually, multiple racks can be scaled together. Dell EMC, HPE and Lenovo are initial launch partners. Cisco plans to offer a certified Azure Stack platform based on its UCS hardware line by the end of 2017 and Huawei will roll out Azure Stack support by the end of 2018.IDC Data Center Networking Research Analyst Brad Casemore says he believes customers will need to run at least a 10 Gigabit Ethernet cabling with dual-port mixing. Converged network interface cards, support for BGP and data center bridging are important too. Microsoft estimates that a full-sized, 12-rack server unit of Azure Stack can supply about 400 virtual machines with 2 CPUs and 7 GB of RAM, with resiliency.

And Lydia explains the “people want private cloud ¯_(ツ)_/¯” angle:

“This is definitely a plus in the Microsoft portfolio,” says Gartner VP and Distinguished Analyst Lydia Leong, but she says it’s not right for every customer. “I don’t think this is a fundamental game-changer in the dynamics of the IaaS market,” she notes, but “this is going to be another thing to compel Microsoft-centric organizations to use Azure.”

Leong expects this could be beneficial for customers who want to use Azure but some reason such as regulations, data sensitivity, or location of data prevents them from using the public cloud. If a customer has sensitive data they’re not willing to put in the public cloud, they could deploy Azure Stack behind their firewall to process data, then relatively easily interact with applications and data in the public cloud.

Source: “Azure Stack: Microsoft’s private-cloud platform and what IT pros need to know about it,” Brandon Butler

AWS’s private cloud stuff to day, plus VMware

Good round-up of AWS’s private cloud stuff:

  • AWS added on-premises support to its CodeDeploy continuous-delivery service in 2015.
  • AWS introduced the Snowball storage server companies could use to copy data and then ship it to the cloud in 2015.
  • AWS added on-premises support to its EC2 Run Command tool for running shell scripts on many machines at once in 2016.
  • AWS unveiled the Snowmobile truck for copying even larger supplies of data and then hauling it off to Amazon in 2016.
  • This past November AWS released a container image of its Amazon Linux server operating system for use on corporate servers.

Source: AWS talking with VMware about building on-premises software: report

Rackspace partners with Pivotal to launch managed services for Cloud Foundry

“Managed Pivotal Cloud Foundry is Rackspace’s first step into the managed platform space, as we move up the stack to solutions that customers want our help with,” wrote Brannon Lacey, vice president of applications and platforms at Rackspace, in today’s announcement. “It is a solution that helps customers get up and running on Pivotal Cloud Foundry quickly and stay up and running, with operational support and proactive monitoring. This way, in-house teams can focus on innovation and getting out to market quickly while Rackspace handles the backend.”

Source: Rackspace partners with Pivotal to launch managed services for Cloud Foundry, Frederic Lardinois, TechCrunch

Twitter’s video deals mean it’s giving up on business model innovation

So says Ben Thompson in his newsletter today:

This is why Twitter’s increased focus on securing these video deals feels like such an admission of failure: the company is basically admitting that, despite the fact it contains some of the best content — given to it for free — in the world, it simply can’t figure out how to make that into a business, so instead it is (presumably) paying to create content that it can monetize more easily. The Bloomberg deal, which was first reported on Sunday, is particularly poignant on this point: Twitter is (again, presumably) paying for content about business and financial markets even as the most valuable business and financial market information is being posted for free on Twitter. That the company cannot build a business on that fact is certainly a disappointment.

You’ll have to subscribe to read the rest. For $100 a year, it’s worth it.

Meanwhile, some stats from Sara Fischer at Axios:

In total, Twitter has closed over 40 live stream partnerships around the world with sports leagues, media companies, etc. The company increased live programming by 60% last quarter and aired roughly 800 hours of live content reaching 45 million viewers. Of those hours, 51% were sports, 35% were news and politics, and 14% were entertainment. Above all, Twitter says 55% of its unique viewers are under the age of 25, a stat that directly competes with Snapchat’s coveted millennial demographic.

There’s also an extensive list of the video partnerships and shows to be broadcast in Twitter.