Link: The full-time job of keeping up with Kubernetes

“In practice and actual fact, what really matters for older Kubernetes version support is the continued availability and exercising of its end-to-end testing pipeline. If the machinery to quickly update an old release continues to exist, and exist in a state of good (non-flakey) repair, cutting a patch release is just a matter of someone – you, your provider or your vendor – having the engineering gumption to push it through. If a critical security fix isn’t back-ported to an older Kubernetes version, that’s a strong sign that no reasonably professional team is using that version in production anymore.”
Original source: The full-time job of keeping up with Kubernetes

Link: Canonical founder Mark Shuttleworth takes aim at VMware and Red Hat at OpenStack Summit

“A lot of institutions are figuring out that Ubuntu and upstream Kubernetes gives them 80% of what they need from PaaS, while the open Kubernetes ecosystem takes care of the remaining 20%. And that comes in at a third of the cost of Red Hat,” he said.

Also, he says they’re much cheaper than VMware and RHEL.
Original source: Canonical founder Mark Shuttleworth takes aim at VMware and Red Hat at OpenStack Summit

Link: Future of Jakarta Is in the Cloud, Not with the JCP: One-on-One with Mike Milinkovich

“Q: Just to be clear, the Eclipse Jakarta EE Working Group is where the new specification process is going to be managed entirely, and the JCP is out of the picture. Right?
A: Right. The JCP is going to continue to exist, of course, but it will be focused entirely on the Java language platform, the JDK, the JRE, that level of the Java technology. The Eclipse Foundation and its members and the Jakarta EE Working Group will define the future evolution of cloud-native Java.”
Original source: Future of Jakarta Is in the Cloud, Not with the JCP: One-on-One with Mike Milinkovich

Link: Monitoring continues to be a valuable part of the hybrid cloud, as Sensu raises $10M

“Sensu Enterprise is the commercial version of that project, and it costs between $99 and $999 depending on how many servers you’ll need to monitor your cloud environment. You also get customer service that you won’t get if you try to install the open-source project on your own, a key part of the strategy of many enterprise startups building around open-source projects.”
Original source: Monitoring continues to be a valuable part of the hybrid cloud, as Sensu raises $10M

Link: Will open source software become a ‘tragedy of the commons’?

I love this concept of tragedy of the anti-commons: “Strong management can stop this overuse. But because contributors haven’t been able to derive value through a platform built just for them, they must look for other ways to gain value, perhaps through the addition of intellectual property. And this leads us into the tragedy of the anti-commons. We have seen cases where a fork of an open source software project or even just the threat of a fork can act as disincentive to steering or influencing for a particular group or provider’s benefit, but this presents other challenges to the code moving forward.”
Original source: Will open source software become a ‘tragedy of the commons’?

Link: WSO2: Our 2017 Results and 2018 Plan

2% profit margin is much better than no- or negative-percent.

“In 2017, we will exit our Annualized Recurring Revenue (ARR) between $24.5 — $25.5M, a growth of 52%, up from 46% growth the previous year. Our gross margin for the recurring business is 88%, and will increase in coming years. In 2017, we will turn our first profit with $603K EBITDA and generate $2.7M cash from operations.”
Original source: WSO2: Our 2017 Results and 2018 Plan