With no competition, government websites often have no incentive to be good

In contrast to agile, private-sector companies, the public sector does not face any pressure from competition. When it comes time to renew your license, there is only one place for you to do that: and, unfortunately for Americans, that’s the DMV. With no competitive forces, government agencies do not have to innovate or take bold risks when it comes to digital.

And, as ever, being smart about using updated tools and new methods yield huge productivity results:

While running technology for Obama’s WhiteHouse.gov, open-source solutions enabled our team to deliver projects on budget and up to 75% faster than alternative proprietary-software options. More than anything, open-source technology allows governments to utilize a large ecosystem of developers, which enhances innovation and collaboration while driving down the cost to taxpayers.

While open source has different cost dynamic, I’d suggest that simply switching to new software to get the latest features and mindset that the software imbues gives you a boost. Open source, when picked well, will come with that community and an ongoing focus on updates: older software that has long been abandoned by the community and vendors will stall out and become stale, open or not.

With most large organizations, and especially government, simply doing something will give you a huge boost in all your KPIs in the short term. Picking a thriving, vibrant stack is critical for long term success. Otherwise, five or ten years from now, whether using open or closed source, you’ll end up in the same spot, dead in the water and sucking.

Link

Talend IPO’s

The open source based data integration (basically, evolved ETL) company Talend IPO’ed this week. It’s a ten year old company, based on open source, with a huge French tie-in. Interesting all around. Here’s some details on them:

  • “1,300 customers include Air France, Citi, and General Electric.” That’s way up from 400 back in 2009, seven years ago.
  • In 2015 “Talend generated a total revenue of $76 million. Its subscription revenue grew 39% year over year, representing $62.7 million of the total. The company isn’t profitable: it reported a net loss of $22 million for 2015.”
  • “…much of that [loss] thanks to the $49 million it spent on sales and marketing,” according yo Julie Bort.
  • “Subscription revenue rose 27% to $63m while service fees stayed flat at $13m,” according to Matt Aslett.
  • It looks like the IPO performed well, up ~50% from the opening price.

TAM Time

By this point, I’m sure Talend messes around in other TAMs, but way back when I used to follow the business intelligence and big data market more closely, I recall that much of the growth – though small in TAM – was in ETL. People always like the gussy it up as “data integration”: sure thing, hoss.

That seems still be the case as spelled out a recent magic quadrant of the space (courtesy of the big dog in the space, Informatica):

Gartner estimates that the data integration tool market was worth approximately $2.4 billion in constant currency at the end of 2014, an increase of 6.9% from 2013. The growth rate is above the average for the enterprise software market as a whole, as data integration capability continues to be considered of critical importance for addressing the diversity of problems and emerging requirements. A projected five-year compound annual growth rate of approximately 7.7% will bring the total to more than $3.4 billion by 2019

In comparison, here’s the same from the 2011 MQ:

Gartner estimates that the data integration tools market amounted to $1.63 billion at the end of 2010, an increase of 20.5% from 2009. The market continues to demonstrate healthy growth, and we expect a year-on-year increase of approximately 15% in 2011. A projected five-year compound annual growth rate of approximately 11.4% will bring the total to $2.79 billion by 2015.

Meanwhile check out Carl Lehmann’s recent overview of Informatica and the general data integration market and Matt Aslett’s coverage of IPO plans back in June for a good overview of Talend.

Oracle says it is ‘committed’ to Java EE 8 – amid claims it quietly axed future development

There was a bit of a stink recently that Oracle was backing out of JEE support, the layer above the core of Java that provides a lot of common APIs, services, and frameworks that orginizations use to make applications.

“Almost all work from Oracle on Java EE has ceased for more than six months with no end to the inactivity in sight. Unless things change soon Java EE 8 won’t be delivered in anywhere near the time when it was initially promised if it is delivered at all.”

It’s open source with implementations of it being closed source (in the form of Java application servers like JBoss, WebLogic, WebSphere, etc.). These are the stacks that many, many orginizations use: it’s a sub-set of the application infrastructure and middleware market which Gartner estimated to be around $23.8bn in 2014. So: lots of use out there.

Whatever that “backing off plan” may have been, Oracle seems to be backing off those plans and is back on the open JEE

Very recently, however, amid intense pressure from the community, IBM and Red Hat, The Register understands Oracle executives realized that the proprietary API route would be a disaster: it would cause too much damage to the ecosystem, and there was no guarantee people would use the new closed-source API.

Source: Oracle says it is ‘committed’ to Java EE 8 – amid claims it quietly axed future development

Google Hopes Open Source Will Give Its Cloud A Path To The Enterprise

’“Google is not an enterprise company and we are trying to become cognizant of what the enterprise needs,” Craig McLuckie, Google’s product manager in charge of its Kubernetes and Google Container Engine’

Google Hopes Open Source Will Give Its Cloud A Path To The Enterprise

Open Source Usage in Large Enterprises

Across “100 C-Level execs” usage at their company: “When it comes to the actual usage of open source software (OSS) in large enterprises, only 21% of them use it across the enterprise and 25% have deployed it in a business unit. The other 54% are either at the planning phase (21%), or use it for Internet-related programs (13%) or are running a pilot program to evaluate it (20%)”

Open Source Usage in Large Enterprises