Link: Cloud Native Computing Foundation Accepts Harbor Into CNCF Sandbox

“Harbor is a privately hosted registry, which allows running either on-premises or in any of the major cloud vendors, making it a possibility for organizations that cannot use a public container registry or want to implement a multi-cloud strategy. Harbor started as an internal VMware project and became open source in 2016. Multiple partners, including companies like Pivotal and Rancher, either use Harbor for their container-based environment or work together with Harbor to give the possibility of running the project on their infrastructure. For instance, the Pivotal Container Service includes Harbor as its built-in container registry. For Rancher, Harbor is one of the packages you can deploy to provide a container registry. Moreover, Harbor gives the option to set up multiple instances of these registries on several of these platforms simultaneously and allows replication between them. Through the signing and vulnerability scanning capabilities provided by the project, it turns these into trusted resources.”
Original source: Cloud Native Computing Foundation Accepts Harbor Into CNCF Sandbox

Link: Google sets Kubernetes free with $9m in its pocket for expenses

“CNCF has reason to be magnanimous beyond the Chocolate Factory prize money – cloud-oriented enterprise software is all the rage. According to CNCF stats published on Wednesday, production usage of CNCF projects has increased more than 200 per cent on average since December 2017 and evaluation – companies testing said code – has risen 372 per cent…. Among CNCF survey respondents – 2,400 IT-types mostly from the US and Europe – 40 per cent of those from enterprise companies (5,000+ employees) report running Kubernetes in production. Over the whole set of people answering the survey, 58 per cent said they are using Kubernetes in production, with 42 per cent considering it for future deployment.”
Original source: Google sets Kubernetes free with $9m in its pocket for expenses

Link: Redis Pulls Back on Open Source Licensing, Citing Stingy Cloud Services

“The modules in question are used to help create managed services on top of Redis, namely RediSearch, Redis Graph, ReJSON, Redis-ML, and Rebloom. Licensed under Apache 2.0 modified with Commons Clause, these can still be freely used in any application, though they can’t be used in a commercial Redis-based offering. For that, you will have to call Redis Labs and work out a paid licensing arrangement.”
Original source: Redis Pulls Back on Open Source Licensing, Citing Stingy Cloud Services

Link: The full-time job of keeping up with Kubernetes

“In practice and actual fact, what really matters for older Kubernetes version support is the continued availability and exercising of its end-to-end testing pipeline. If the machinery to quickly update an old release continues to exist, and exist in a state of good (non-flakey) repair, cutting a patch release is just a matter of someone – you, your provider or your vendor – having the engineering gumption to push it through. If a critical security fix isn’t back-ported to an older Kubernetes version, that’s a strong sign that no reasonably professional team is using that version in production anymore.”
Original source: The full-time job of keeping up with Kubernetes

Link: Canonical founder Mark Shuttleworth takes aim at VMware and Red Hat at OpenStack Summit

“A lot of institutions are figuring out that Ubuntu and upstream Kubernetes gives them 80% of what they need from PaaS, while the open Kubernetes ecosystem takes care of the remaining 20%. And that comes in at a third of the cost of Red Hat,” he said.

Also, he says they’re much cheaper than VMware and RHEL.
Original source: Canonical founder Mark Shuttleworth takes aim at VMware and Red Hat at OpenStack Summit