Link: DigitalOcean Survey Results Reveal the State of Open Source

“Nearly three quarter of developers surveyed say that their company expects them to use open source software to do their job. When deciding what projects to use, their companies place a premium on widely adopted technology (63%) with good documentation (48%) and active maintainers (42%).”
Original source: DigitalOcean Survey Results Reveal the State of Open Source

Link: Cloud Native Computing Foundation Accepts Harbor Into CNCF Sandbox

“Harbor is a privately hosted registry, which allows running either on-premises or in any of the major cloud vendors, making it a possibility for organizations that cannot use a public container registry or want to implement a multi-cloud strategy. Harbor started as an internal VMware project and became open source in 2016. Multiple partners, including companies like Pivotal and Rancher, either use Harbor for their container-based environment or work together with Harbor to give the possibility of running the project on their infrastructure. For instance, the Pivotal Container Service includes Harbor as its built-in container registry. For Rancher, Harbor is one of the packages you can deploy to provide a container registry. Moreover, Harbor gives the option to set up multiple instances of these registries on several of these platforms simultaneously and allows replication between them. Through the signing and vulnerability scanning capabilities provided by the project, it turns these into trusted resources.”
Original source: Cloud Native Computing Foundation Accepts Harbor Into CNCF Sandbox

Link: Google sets Kubernetes free with $9m in its pocket for expenses

“CNCF has reason to be magnanimous beyond the Chocolate Factory prize money – cloud-oriented enterprise software is all the rage. According to CNCF stats published on Wednesday, production usage of CNCF projects has increased more than 200 per cent on average since December 2017 and evaluation – companies testing said code – has risen 372 per cent…. Among CNCF survey respondents – 2,400 IT-types mostly from the US and Europe – 40 per cent of those from enterprise companies (5,000+ employees) report running Kubernetes in production. Over the whole set of people answering the survey, 58 per cent said they are using Kubernetes in production, with 42 per cent considering it for future deployment.”
Original source: Google sets Kubernetes free with $9m in its pocket for expenses

Link: Redis Pulls Back on Open Source Licensing, Citing Stingy Cloud Services

“The modules in question are used to help create managed services on top of Redis, namely RediSearch, Redis Graph, ReJSON, Redis-ML, and Rebloom. Licensed under Apache 2.0 modified with Commons Clause, these can still be freely used in any application, though they can’t be used in a commercial Redis-based offering. For that, you will have to call Redis Labs and work out a paid licensing arrangement.”
Original source: Redis Pulls Back on Open Source Licensing, Citing Stingy Cloud Services

Link: Red Hat’s James Talks About the Importance of Open Source Innovat

People always want MSPs is to add higher level services, to become more like public cloud. Also, some arch open source/lock-in talk.
Original source: Red Hat’s James Talks About the Importance of Open Source Innovat

Link: Red Hat’s James Talks About the Importance of Open Source Innovat

People always want MSPs is to add higher level services, to become more like public cloud. Also, some arch open source/lock-in talk.
Original source: Red Hat’s James Talks About the Importance of Open Source Innovat

Link: The full-time job of keeping up with Kubernetes

“In practice and actual fact, what really matters for older Kubernetes version support is the continued availability and exercising of its end-to-end testing pipeline. If the machinery to quickly update an old release continues to exist, and exist in a state of good (non-flakey) repair, cutting a patch release is just a matter of someone – you, your provider or your vendor – having the engineering gumption to push it through. If a critical security fix isn’t back-ported to an older Kubernetes version, that’s a strong sign that no reasonably professional team is using that version in production anymore.”
Original source: The full-time job of keeping up with Kubernetes

Link: The Kubernetes ‘fork’: Open source purists miss the point | InfoWorld

“Enterprises want stuff that works. As much as we in the open source world chatter and fret about vendor lockin, enterprises have demonstrated a remarkable ability to shrug off that concern and buy deeply into Microsoft, Oracle, and, yes, Red Hat’s OpenShift.”
Original source: The Kubernetes ‘fork’: Open source purists miss the point | InfoWorld

Link: Canonical founder Mark Shuttleworth takes aim at VMware and Red Hat at OpenStack Summit

“A lot of institutions are figuring out that Ubuntu and upstream Kubernetes gives them 80% of what they need from PaaS, while the open Kubernetes ecosystem takes care of the remaining 20%. And that comes in at a third of the cost of Red Hat,” he said.

Also, he says they’re much cheaper than VMware and RHEL.
Original source: Canonical founder Mark Shuttleworth takes aim at VMware and Red Hat at OpenStack Summit

Link: Future of Jakarta Is in the Cloud, Not with the JCP: One-on-One with Mike Milinkovich

“Q: Just to be clear, the Eclipse Jakarta EE Working Group is where the new specification process is going to be managed entirely, and the JCP is out of the picture. Right?
A: Right. The JCP is going to continue to exist, of course, but it will be focused entirely on the Java language platform, the JDK, the JRE, that level of the Java technology. The Eclipse Foundation and its members and the Jakarta EE Working Group will define the future evolution of cloud-native Java.”
Original source: Future of Jakarta Is in the Cloud, Not with the JCP: One-on-One with Mike Milinkovich

Link: Monitoring continues to be a valuable part of the hybrid cloud, as Sensu raises $10M

“Sensu Enterprise is the commercial version of that project, and it costs between $99 and $999 depending on how many servers you’ll need to monitor your cloud environment. You also get customer service that you won’t get if you try to install the open-source project on your own, a key part of the strategy of many enterprise startups building around open-source projects.”
Original source: Monitoring continues to be a valuable part of the hybrid cloud, as Sensu raises $10M

Link: Will open source software become a ‘tragedy of the commons’?

I love this concept of tragedy of the anti-commons: “Strong management can stop this overuse. But because contributors haven’t been able to derive value through a platform built just for them, they must look for other ways to gain value, perhaps through the addition of intellectual property. And this leads us into the tragedy of the anti-commons. We have seen cases where a fork of an open source software project or even just the threat of a fork can act as disincentive to steering or influencing for a particular group or provider’s benefit, but this presents other challenges to the code moving forward.”
Original source: Will open source software become a ‘tragedy of the commons’?

Link: WSO2: Our 2017 Results and 2018 Plan

2% profit margin is much better than no- or negative-percent.

“In 2017, we will exit our Annualized Recurring Revenue (ARR) between $24.5 — $25.5M, a growth of 52%, up from 46% growth the previous year. Our gross margin for the recurring business is 88%, and will increase in coming years. In 2017, we will turn our first profit with $603K EBITDA and generate $2.7M cash from operations.”
Original source: WSO2: Our 2017 Results and 2018 Plan

Link: The critics are wrong about AWS’s open source approach

“Is AWS selfish? Sure. Does that selfishness translate into greater developer productivity with machine learning and other enterprise software in the process? Yes. And it’s not merely a convenient byproduct: It’s the whole reason AWS exists.”
Original source: The critics are wrong about AWS’s open source approach

​Link: Red Hat on its way to becoming the first billion-dollar-a-quarter open-source company

‘I’ll tell you something that’s not fantasy. In the next few years, Red Hat will become the first billion-dollar-a-quarter open-source company, and that’s real money… Here’s how. First, as Jim Whitehurst, Red Hat CEO, said in the earnings call, “We anticipate exiting the fiscal year with an annualized run-rate of approximately $3 billion for total revenue.”’

Link to original

With no competition, government websites often have no incentive to be good

In contrast to agile, private-sector companies, the public sector does not face any pressure from competition. When it comes time to renew your license, there is only one place for you to do that: and, unfortunately for Americans, that’s the DMV. With no competitive forces, government agencies do not have to innovate or take bold risks when it comes to digital.

And, as ever, being smart about using updated tools and new methods yield huge productivity results:

While running technology for Obama’s WhiteHouse.gov, open-source solutions enabled our team to deliver projects on budget and up to 75% faster than alternative proprietary-software options. More than anything, open-source technology allows governments to utilize a large ecosystem of developers, which enhances innovation and collaboration while driving down the cost to taxpayers.

While open source has different cost dynamic, I’d suggest that simply switching to new software to get the latest features and mindset that the software imbues gives you a boost. Open source, when picked well, will come with that community and an ongoing focus on updates: older software that has long been abandoned by the community and vendors will stall out and become stale, open or not.

With most large organizations, and especially government, simply doing something will give you a huge boost in all your KPIs in the short term. Picking a thriving, vibrant stack is critical for long term success. Otherwise, five or ten years from now, whether using open or closed source, you’ll end up in the same spot, dead in the water and sucking.

Link