Link: Microsoft, Red Hat Partner on OpenShift

The OpenShift-Azure deal extends collaboration between Microsoft and Red Hat that includes the addition of Microsoft SQL server on Red Hat Enterprise Linux. The deal signaled Microsoft’s embrace of OpenShift application container management.

The expanded partnership also gives OpenShift users access to public cloud services such as Azure Cosmos and SQL databases along with cloud-based machine learning models aimed at development of cloud-native enterprise applications.

OpenShift on Azure would “simplify container management on Kubernetes and help customers innovate on their cloud journeys,” added Scott Guthrie, executive vice president of Microsoft’s Cloud and AI Group.

Azure Red Hat OpenShift is available now on Microsoft Azure

Source: Microsoft, Red Hat Partner on OpenShift

Link: Galloping greenback rocks Red Hat

“30 per cent growth in emerging technologies came in part from 100 new customers signing up for the company’s OpenShift container platform…. The company’s services business grew nicely and president and CEO Jim Whitehurst proudly pointed out that Red Hat now has over 1,000 subscribers, up 70 per cent year on year.”

And:

“The company also admitted to some weakness in its middleware business, but Whitehurst said that should turn around as sales of OpenShift pick up because it needs middleware. However Shander said Oracle and IBM are discounting middleware by 98 per cent “or whatever it takes to hold onto that tail of the business”, making the field hard.’
Original source: Galloping greenback rocks Red Hat

Link: CoreOS Is New Linux, Not A RHEL Classic Killer

‘Importantly, the OpenShift platform cloud software, which included Red Hat’s own implementation of the Kubernetes container controller, will be deployable on either the full-on Red Hat Enterprise Linux in pets mode or the minimalist Red Hat CoreOS in cattle mode. But it will be using the Tectonic version of the Kubernetes controller going forward as well as integrating the Prometheus monitoring tool and etcd for storing telemetry. Gracely tells The Next Platform that the implementation of Kubernetes had outside dependencies such as the CloudForms hybrid cloud management tool (formerly ManageIQ) and was not “native” to Kubernetes in the same way that Tectonic is, meaning free of outside dependenies.’
Original source: CoreOS Is New Linux, Not A RHEL Classic Killer

Link: Red Hat is in the pink: Cracks $3bn revenue run rate as subs take off

“Full fiscal year subscription revenue hit $2.6 billion, up 21 per cent year-over-year”
Original source: Red Hat is in the pink: Cracks $3bn revenue run rate as subs take off

Red Hat OpenShift Momentum – Highlights

Brian Gracely of Red Hat (and formally an analyst who did some of the best “cloud-native”/cloud platform work early on) has a momentum post on Open Shift. Here’s my highlights:

Sizing up revenue and deal-size:
[Q3, FY 2017] Also of note, we closed our second OpenShift deal over $10 million and another OpenShift deal over $5 million. And significantly, we actually had over 50 OpenShift deals alone that were six or seven figures, so really strong traction. [Q4, FY 2017] with our largest deals in Q4 approximately one-third had an OpenShift container platform component.
Red Hat hasn’t yet been too clear on OpenShift revenue, so you have to tea-leave out these revenue spreads, which I haven’t really done. Earlier in April, Jeffrey Burt at The Next Platform had this to say:
During the final three months of last year, subscription revenue for Red Hat’s application development-related [JBoss, etc] and other emerging technologies – which includes OpenShift – hit $125 million, a 40 percent increase from the same period in 2015, and revenue for the group accounted for about 20 percent of Red Hat’s overall revenues for the fourth quarter.
Today, we also announced that Barclays Bank, the Government of British Columbias Office of the CIO, and Macquarie Bank are also using Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform to modernize application development…. airplane manufacturer Airbus about their DevOps journey, and digital travel platform Amadeus about their transformation of handling 2,000x the number of online transactions…. how Amsterdams Schipol Airport (AMS) is using OpenShift to redefine the in-terminal travel experience, how Miles & More GmbH is better managing rewards programs for travelers, and how ATPCO is rethinking how they publish fare-related data to the airline and travel industry.
Much of the write-up focuses on community momentum, true to Red Hat, open source form:

The OpenShift Commons community has 260+ member organizations….

Red Hat engineers lead or co-lead in 10 of the 24 Kubernetes SIG activities.
Finally, some commentary on their strategic shift to Kubernetes:
The huge architectural shift that we made a few years ago in adopting open standards for containers and the Kubernetes container scheduler has allowed us to delivered a unified platform to containerize existing applications and deliver agility and scalability for cloud-native applications and microservices. We call this combination Enterprise Kubernetes+, or Enterprise-Ready Kubernetes.
Red Hat’s OpenShift is, of course, a competitor to us over at Pivotal.