People stuck in the email backwoods

Only 8% of office system users employ cloud-hosted email and desktop applications, according to analyst company Gartner
Gartner expects that 10% of enterprise email inboxes will be hosted in the cloud by the end of 2014.
…adoption will accelerate from the first half to 2015, reaching 33% penetartiong in 2017 and 60% by 2022

Just 8% of workers use cloud for office apps

These figures – which I pretty much believe – always baffle me. Running your own email has got to be one the least valuable, more annoying services you can do. It also causes all sorts of BYOD hassles. The more important part is catching up to the consumertech grade quality of cloud email, and being able to integrate into the application and services ecosystems users of services like GMail have access to. Otherwise, you’re stuck on the on-premises backwoods of Exchange and Outlook – an email approach that equally baffles me when it comes to productivity, e.g., tiny quotas, desktop syncing, and the lack of "basics" like archiving and useful search.

The pushback I get is always around security and the usual stick in the mud stuff.

Who’s collecting Android profits?

As you have probably guessed, the one making the most profit from Android is market leader Samsung, but the actual figure may come as a surprise, as it’s said to have taken almost 95 percent of the global profits earned from the mobile OS during the first quarter of 2013.

Analysts broke it down like this: Globally, it’s estimated the Android industry made $5.3 billion profit in the first quarter of this year, while the profit estimates for Android phones shipped by Samsung comes in at $5.1 billion for the same period. The exact figure quoted is 94.7 percent profit share, and that’s not including tablets either.

How much? Samsung swipes 95 percent of total industry profits earned from Android phones