Link: Is Microsoft Azure really making up ground on AWS?

In terms of raw figures, not growth, Azure is still a way behind. Even a generous assumption of Azure’s share of that US$5.3 billion intelligent cloud revenue figure for the quarter would put it well behind the US$5.1 billion AWS racked in over a similar period. Dave Bartoletti, a principal analyst at Forrester estimates AWS revenue at US$18 billion and Azure, excluding Office 365 and other non-platform revenue, at US$12 billion for the calendar year. “Azure has been growing faster on a smaller base, yes, but in our view, AWS’s growth is still very strong even at their size,” he added. “Azure is giving AWS a run globally, and is close to feature parity on many services. “Azure has also aggressively built out global regions and is on par with AWS for global data centre locations. It’s a healthy and exciting market, and Azure’s doing quite well.”
Original source: Is Microsoft Azure really making up ground on AWS?

Link: Microsoft results show a distributed computing future

“The company reported 98% Azure revenue growth this quarter and commercial cloud revenue growth of 56% year-on-year to $5.3bn. The shift to Office 365 recurring revenue is also beginning to pay off, with the company reporting a 41% increase in Office 365 commercial revenue from installed base growth.”
Original source: Microsoft results show a distributed computing future

Link: Strong financial results from Microsoft as it aims for breadth of services

“strong results such as these show how the company can succeed by continuing to migrate its business users to cloud services. It remains deeply embedded in business computing”
Original source: Strong financial results from Microsoft as it aims for breadth of services

Link: GDPR requests to take thousands of hours a month, says survey

“Large enterprises expect to get an average 246 GDPR enquiries per month, for which they will need to search 43 databases (seven minutes per search). They will spend more than 1,259 hours on this, which equates to nearly 60 hours of searches per working day or 7.5 employees dedicated solely to GDPR enquiries.”

It’s a database management company doing the survey, but still a good wet finger in the wind
Original source: GDPR requests to take thousands of hours a month, says survey

Link: Appian survey: Big obstacles to digital transformation

Vendor survey done with 463 respondants over on DevOps.com, good news topics:

“A lack of IT skills was reported by 82 percent; 91 percent are struggling with technical debt; 20 percent have huge application backlogs of more than 50 new app requests; and 72 per cent said they don’t have confidence in being able to scale IT to meet the needs of the business.”
Original source: Appian survey: Big obstacles to digital transformation

Link: Driven by AI, blockchain and IoT, IT spending could hit $3.7 trillion in 2018 – SiliconANGLE

Gartner says: “businesses will spend nearly $3.7 trillion on information technology hardware, software and services in 2018, up 4.5 percent [y/y]”
Original source: Driven by AI, blockchain and IoT, IT spending could hit $3.7 trillion in 2018 – SiliconANGLE

Link: Amazon lost cloud market share to Microsoft in the fourth quarter: KeyBanc

For 4Q2017: “Amazon Web Services had 62 percent market share in the quarter, down from 68 percent a year earlier, KeyBanc’s Brent Bracelin and other analysts wrote in a note on Thursday. Microsoft Azure jumped from 16 percent to 20 percent, and Google’s share increased from 10 percent to 12 percent, they said.”
Original source: Amazon lost cloud market share to Microsoft in the fourth quarter: KeyBanc

Link: Private cloud TCO and such, from 451

“private cloud can be a less expensive option for enterprises than public cloud. Forty-one percent of 150 IT decision-makers surveyed in February 2017 as part of a custom 451 Research project for VMware claimed to be operating their own private clouds at lower unit costs than public cloud.”
Link to original

Link: Your Uber Car Creates Congestion. That May Cost You More To Ride. – New York Times

“About 103,000 for-hire vehicles operate in the city, more than double the roughly 47,000 in 2013, according to the Taxi and Limousine Commission. Of those, 68,000 are affiliated with ride-hailing app companies, including 65,000 with Uber alone, though they may also provide rides for others. In contrast, yellow taxis are capped by city law at just under 13,600.”

On the other hand, it’s probably easier to get around, even if slower. And, you know, how are you gonna solve for the density of Manhattan, esp. if people don’t want to foot the bill for lots of mass transit?
Link to original

​Link: Red Hat on its way to becoming the first billion-dollar-a-quarter open-source company

‘I’ll tell you something that’s not fantasy. In the next few years, Red Hat will become the first billion-dollar-a-quarter open-source company, and that’s real money… Here’s how. First, as Jim Whitehurst, Red Hat CEO, said in the earnings call, “We anticipate exiting the fiscal year with an annualized run-rate of approximately $3 billion for total revenue.”’

Link to original

People get upset when others make more money, and they don’t

Between 1990 and 2010 the rate of economic convergence across American states slowed to less than half what it had been between 1880 and 1980. It has since fallen close to zero. Rich cities started pulling away from less well-off counterparts (see chart 1). According to the Brookings Institution, a think-tank, in the decade to 2015 productivity growth in American metropolitan areas was highest in the top 10% and the bottom 20% (where, by definition, the baseline was low). Struggling middle-income cities like Scranton fell further behind. A recent report by the OECD found that, in its mostly-rich members, the average productivity gap between the most productive 10% of regions and the bottom 75% widened by nearly 60% over the past 20 years.

Source: Left in the lurchGlobalisation has marginalised many regions in the rich world

Private cloud: avoiding an existential crisis

451 Research’s data points suggest that some workloads are likely to remain on private cloud regardless of any disruptor’s attack. And even with hungry cloud providers eyeing private workloads, growth is likely to continue across all cloud models, not just public cloud.

Whole bunch of survey numbers tryin’ figure out how many workloads will stay on private cloud.

Source: Private cloud: avoiding an existential crisis

TIBCO agrees to acquire Cisco’s data virtualization business – 451

The details of the acquisition were not disclosed, but we would be surprised if Cisco made back any of the $180m it paid for Composite Software in 2013. Cisco did at least manage to grow the data virtualization business during its ownership. The company told us in September 2016 that it had 250 paying customers for what was then Cisco Data Virtualization (up from 200 at the time of its acquisition of Composite Software). The deal is expected to close in the coming weeks.

Source: TIBCO agrees to acquire Cisco’s data virtualization business