Link: How vulture capitalists ate Toys ‘R’ Us

“Just before the buyout, the company had $2.2 billion in cash and cash-equivalents. By 2017, its stockpile had shriveled to $301 million, even as its debt burden ballooned from $2.3 billion to $5.2 billion. Meanwhile, Toys ‘R’ Us was paying $425 million to $517 million in interest every year. This enormous cash drain probably made it impossible for the company to invest or innovate even if its trio of buyers had been up to the challenge.”

Debt is its own disruption.
Original source: How vulture capitalists ate Toys ‘R’ Us

Link: Uber Spent $10.7 Billion in Nine Years. Does It Have Enough to Show for It?

“Amazon.com Inc. is famous for its losses over the years. But even in the heyday of the dot-com bubble, the e-commerce giant never came close. Amazon’s biggest loss was in 2000—a $1.4 billion embarrassment, or about $2 billion adjusted for inflation. Most years, Amazon turns a profit, albeit a small one. What Uber backers can point to, though, is a nearly unmatched pace of sales growth. Even as Uber’s revenue reached $2.3 billion in the fourth quarter of 2017, its annual growth rate remained strong, at about 90 percent compared with 2016. That’s faster than most tech companies with a similar valuation. Only one U.S. tech company of Uber’s size, Micron, grew at anything close to that last year.”
Original source: Uber Spent $10.7 Billion in Nine Years. Does It Have Enough to Show for It?

Link: Is Microsoft Azure really making up ground on AWS?

In terms of raw figures, not growth, Azure is still a way behind. Even a generous assumption of Azure’s share of that US$5.3 billion intelligent cloud revenue figure for the quarter would put it well behind the US$5.1 billion AWS racked in over a similar period. Dave Bartoletti, a principal analyst at Forrester estimates AWS revenue at US$18 billion and Azure, excluding Office 365 and other non-platform revenue, at US$12 billion for the calendar year. “Azure has been growing faster on a smaller base, yes, but in our view, AWS’s growth is still very strong even at their size,” he added. “Azure is giving AWS a run globally, and is close to feature parity on many services. “Azure has also aggressively built out global regions and is on par with AWS for global data centre locations. It’s a healthy and exciting market, and Azure’s doing quite well.”
Original source: Is Microsoft Azure really making up ground on AWS?