[Link] Regular news vs. newsletter news – Slow Boring

Hey folks. I think if I were in a normal columnist job, I’d be expected to do impeachment takes this week where the goal would be not so much to persuade anyone of anything as simply to restate the views the audience already has, in a better-crafted way one hopes, so as to induce them to share the column on Facebook.

Original source: Regular news vs. newsletter news – Slow Boring

[Link] The Capitol mob desecrated a historical workplace — and left behind some disturbing artifacts

Many members of the Capitol’s janitorial staff are people of color, and it did not go unnoticed by people scrolling through photos of the destruction online that Black and Latino custodians — plus one first-generation Korean American congressman — were the ones picking up a mess left behind by a mostly White group that included, among others, a man carrying a gigantic Confederate flag.

Original source: The Capitol mob desecrated a historical workplace — and left behind some disturbing artifacts

Link: Facebook’s local news project frustrated – by lack of local newspapers

The definition of not enough:

The company deems a community unsuitable for Today In if it cannot find a single day in a month with at least five news items available to share.

And:

Some 1,800 newspapers have closed in the US over the last 15 years, according to the University of North Carolina. Newsroom employment has declined by 45% as the industry struggles with a broken business model partly caused by the success of companies on the internet – including Facebook.

Link: The Improbable Rise of the Daily News Podcast

Turns out there’s money in enclosure tags. Who knew? “In recent weeks, The Daily announced that it was becoming a national radio show. In doing so, it proved that scale can generate millions of dollars in new revenue, as well as (potentially) a hugely valuable spot on the national FM radio dial. That radio slot, in turn, will do wonders not only for The New York Times’ income statement, but also for its standing as a national brand. To put it another way: The Daily’s radio show won’t just make money on its own right, it will sell subscriptions to the newspaper and the website while doing so.”
Original source: The Improbable Rise of the Daily News Podcast

The first time blogging won

Since The Huffington Post was founded 11 years ago, it has become one of the biggest online media organizations, known for its all-caps headlines. In 2011, the publication was acquired by AOL for $315 million, a hefty price tag that signaled the rise of digital media.

The publication won a Pulitzer Prize in 2012 and has expanded globally in the last several years. It has a robust staff that writes original articles, but it is also known for aggressive aggregation, a practice that has at times caused tension in the media industry.

The “HuffPo” and others (many in the AOL/Verizon empire now) formed a sort of apex of blogging, akin to that big wave Hunter Thompson saw out his Vegas hotel window. We don’t really even think of “blogging” much anymore, just publishing.

Source: How the Arab World Came Apart
Arianna Huffington Stepping Down as Huffington Post Editor in Chief