🗂 Link: What is Google up to with Anthos? More toys dropped for Kubernetes-style hybrid cloud

The answer is that Anthos is not really a technology, but more of a brand, a wrapper around Google’s cloud crown jewels, Kubernetes (K8s).

And:

In a nutshell, Anthos is the GKE (Google Kubernetes Engine) deployed on-premises in a certified configuration (via hardware suppliers such as Dell and HPE), with an agent installed that maintains an encrypted connection to Google Cloud Platform (GCP). That agent lets you manage your Anthos cluster and its workloads from the GCP console, deploying and scaling applications. Anthos relies on good connectivity to GCP – for example, using Google Cloud Interconnect.

Source: What is Google up to with Anthos? More toys dropped for Kubernetes-style hybrid cloud

🗂 Link: IT departments spend millions tackling performance issues in complex IT

The vast majority of CIOs expect to deploy new technology stacks in the next 12 months. Most CIOs said they are already using or are planning to deploy microservices (88%), containers (86%), serverless computing (85%), PaaS (89%), SaaS (94%), IaaS (91%) and private cloud (95%) in the next 12 months.

CIO responses captured in the 2019 research indicate that lost revenue (49%) and reputational damage (52%) are among the biggest concerns as businesses transform into software businesses and move to the cloud.

Source: IT departments spend millions tackling performance issues in complex IT

Link: Google debuts migration tool for its Anthos hybrid cloud platform

Anthos applications are deployed in software containers, which are used to host the individual components of each app and make them easier to work with. The main benefit is that developers get to use a single set of tools to build and deploy their apps, and push through updates as necessary, no matter what infrastructure those apps are hosted on. Kubernetes makes it easier to manage large clusters of containerized apps.

Source: Google debuts migration tool for its Anthos hybrid cloud platform

Link: Amazon CTO Werner Vogels on transparency, developers, multi-cloud

The other thing that we’re working with most of our enterprise customers is, what is an exit strategy? What do I need to do, if one moment I decide that I would like to move over to another provider? That for any large enterprise is just good due diligence. If you start using a [SaaS application], you want to know about what do we need to do to get my data out of there, if I want to move let’s say from Salesforce to Workday.

It’s the same for most large enterprises. They want to know how much work is it actually for me to actually move if I decide to go from cloud provider A to cloud provider B, or maybe bring it back on premises.

That’s something that we’ve been working on with most of our large customers, because that’s just good due diligence.

Source: Amazon CTO Werner Vogels on transparency, developers, multi-cloud

DellWorld 2019 coverage, selections

Dell executives have been blunt about their expectations for the impact of 5G and the edge. Dell Technologies Vice Chairman Jeff Clarke told conference attendees that 25% of all data will soon be consumed at the edge through evolving 5G applications. Dell himself was even more expansive, flatly predicting in this interview that compute of data at the edge will be bigger than the public or private cloud.

Source: In gambling mecca, Dell’s founder offers evidence that big bets on multicloud, AI and edge will pay off

Also:

Fifty-five commercial 5G networks will be deployed around the world by the end of 2019, said Malhotra, even though the standards won’t be complete until 2020. Pre-standardisation rollouts aren’t unusual: the same thing happened with 4G, he noted.

Meanwhile, a lot more than normal on the storage angle for all this hybrid cloud stuff.

And, some talk about the company itself:

“Sometimes it occurs organically and sometimes it occurs inorganically,” he said, smirking. “After the combination of EMC and VMware and Pivotal, we are far bigger than any of the individual companies added all together — the revenue synergies have been quite significant.”

Link: Big Blue Puts on a Red Hat: IBM Acquires Red Hat

While many organizations have extensive on and off premise infrastructure investments, comparatively few of them are sophisticated in the way that those environments are tied to each other. If expectations are scaled back to the more realistic “multi-cloud” – the idea that an organization may have investments in more than one environment – the relevance and importance of OpenShift becomes more clear.

This is clever to point out that enterprises have enough trouble integrating their existing, on-premise stuff, let along the complexity and newness of tying together public and private cloud.
Original source: Big Blue Puts on a Red Hat: IBM Acquires Red Hat

Link: Google Cloud Revenue

When asked about Google’s on-premises strategy, Pichai said the company is “thoughtfully looking at it,” and cited its partnerships with SAP, Pivotal, and VMware. Google also has a hybrid-cloud product with Cisco and its own Kubernetes-based GKE On Prem available to early access customers.

On-premises data centers remain “a big, big requirement for customers,” and these partnerships help Google address those companies’ needs, Pichai said. When it comes to hybrid cloud, “we are thinking about how to do that better,” Pichai said. “Our overall approach to cloud hybrid modernization I think is the right long-term direction and so we are doing that.”
Original source: Google Cloud Revenue

Link: Google Cloud Revenue

When asked about Google’s on-premises strategy, Pichai said the company is “thoughtfully looking at it,” and cited its partnerships with SAP, Pivotal, and VMware. Google also has a hybrid-cloud product with Cisco and its own Kubernetes-based GKE On Prem available to early access customers.

On-premises data centers remain “a big, big requirement for customers,” and these partnerships help Google address those companies’ needs, Pichai said. When it comes to hybrid cloud, “we are thinking about how to do that better,” Pichai said. “Our overall approach to cloud hybrid modernization I think is the right long-term direction and so we are doing that.”
Original source: Google Cloud Revenue

Link: VMware’s vision – your multi-cloud substrate for enterprise applications

“Support for VMware’s NSX virtual network over AWS Direct Connect links that allow extending network configuration and security policies from an enterprise data center to AWS. It also enhanced NSX features on the AWS Cloud to include better control over intra-cloud traffic and support for micro-segmented security policies. Support for high-speed Direct Connect links also facilitates application and data migration or busting to the cloud. Further smoothing the path to the cloud, VMware introduced what it calls a data center evacuation service that enables the live or scheduled migration of thousands of VMs with no downtime. It also offers a free cost estimation service to help determine the financial implications of cloud placement for different workloads.”
Original source: VMware’s vision – your multi-cloud substrate for enterprise applications

Link: Finally, a more coherent IBM story?

‘IBM is pushing their cloud hard than ever before. Even though it is mostly IBM Cloud Private, this is the first time I heard a more consistent hybrid cloud story. They have moved away from OpenStack (completely) and CloudFoundry (for the most part) and building a good hybrid cloud story using Kubernetes. Both he product team and services team seem to be quite excited about the opportunity Kubernetes offers them. Kubernetes on Bare Metal as a service is a step in the right direction. Unlike OpenStack and, to some extent, CloudFoundry, Kubernetes gives IBM a chance to have a more unified story from their infrastructure assets to middleware assets. Their “One Cloud Architecture” push is directed in this direction and helps IBM tell a consistent story across their entire portfolio.’
Original source: Finally, a more coherent IBM story?

Link: Finally, a more coherent IBM story?

‘IBM is pushing their cloud hard than ever before. Even though it is mostly IBM Cloud Private, this is the first time I heard a more consistent hybrid cloud story. They have moved away from OpenStack (completely) and CloudFoundry (for the most part) and building a good hybrid cloud story using Kubernetes. Both he product team and services team seem to be quite excited about the opportunity Kubernetes offers them. Kubernetes on Bare Metal as a service is a step in the right direction. Unlike OpenStack and, to some extent, CloudFoundry, Kubernetes gives IBM a chance to have a more unified story from their infrastructure assets to middleware assets. Their “One Cloud Architecture” push is directed in this direction and helps IBM tell a consistent story across their entire portfolio.’
Original source: Finally, a more coherent IBM story?

Link: IBM’s cloud strategy revolves around multi-cloud support, grabbing new workloads

‘Among the moving parts from IBM:

-The IBM Cloud Private platform will get cloud-migration tools with an “application transformation advisor” that scans applications and provides guidance on moving them to the cloud. Cloud Automation Manager will help deploy these applications on-premises or in a cloud of choice.

-Kubernetes container support is expanded. IBM Cloud Private will offer new container versions of IBM app development and management software. These container versions will cover API

-Connect, UrbanCode and Netcool. IBM also added new support for Windows containers running .Net apps.

-A cloud integration platform that includes messaging, API management, app integration, secure gateway and high-speed trial software.

Fidelity’s cloud native stacks

“The company builds its apps in Docker containers. Apps that need to stay on the company’s premises run on an OpenStack private cloud. Amazon Web Services and Microsoft Azure are used for public cloud. Fidelity uses a combination of cloud-native management tools like CloudFormation for AWS, Heat templates for OpenStack, and Terraforms, which runs across both public and private environments. It uses Cloud Foundry as a PaaS layer that spans both public and private clouds, too.”

Read more

Give me less of what I want, and more of what I need

Enterprises don’t need a more modern data center. I repeat, enterprises don’t need a more modern data center. They need to to be able to leverage a variety of data centers that support a variety of services, and they need the I&O team to provide support in order to ensure efficient and effective service delivery. The I&O team cannot be defined by the hardware they own and operate.

Multi-cloud

“At least half of the calls I take are clients that are either actively planning or are already actively deploying a multi-provider strategy,” said Mindy Cancila, an analyst with Gartner, Inc. based in Stamford, Conn. “I believe most organizations are going to end up with more than one public cloud provider, whether they realize it yet or not.”

Two side-notes:

  1. Man, I hope we all start saying “multi-cloud” instead of hybrid cloud.

  2. I used to work with Mindy when we were both at Dell. She’s awesome!

Multi-cloud