ScienceLogic momentum

The company targets very large users, with 60% of its customers being MSPs, followed by enterprises at about 30%, and the rest coming from government agencies. It doesn’t report the number of direct customers, but its website boasts 47,000 organizations as users, many of them employing ScienceLogic via service providers. Average annual contract value for direct customers is $125,000.

Source: ScienceLogic targets new use case aimed at frustrated CMDB users

Pivotal Conversations: Cloud-native monitoring & PCF Metrics, with Todd Persen

This week’s podcast:

In this episode we talk with Todd Persen on the topic of monitoring cloud-native applications with Pivotal Cloud Foundry Metric. We discuss the changing nature of monitoring in cloud-native platforms, how developers can now turn black-boxes into white-boxes, why time-series dominates the thought-technology in this space now, and the benefits of open source taking over most innovation in systems management. Richard is out this week, so Andrew Shafer returns to fill in as co-host.

Listen above, download the MP3 directly, and/or subscribe to the podcast feed if you haven’t.

Update on Dynatrace, around half a million in revenue

From Nancy Gohring:

In 2015, Dynatrace recorded $466.6m in revenue, including $30m from services and $60m from SIGOS, the mobile network-testing company that Keynote acquired in 2006. Dynatrace’s APM revenue was $376.6m, representing 15% growth over the previous year, and making it twice as large by revenue as two of its primary competitors – New Relic and AppDynamics.

She writes fine reports.

Source: Dynatrace tackles integration of Keynote and Ruxit

Stackify caters to DevOps-oriented teams with ITMaaS monitoring tool (451 Report)

Looking for a production monitoring tool? Stackify launched recently, and my 451 report on them is up. Clients can read the full report, but here’s the 451 Take:

Our surveys of this space show steady interest in new tools and methods for monitoring and managing cloud-native applications. There are many entrenched tools from the Big Four (CA, IBM, HP, BMC) and other ‘legacy’ systems management vendors; these vendors have had mixed success in ‘keeping up,’ opening market gaps for Stackify and others. Early success in this market depends on good marketing and go-to-market models, with SolarWinds being an iconic example. The danger for a small company like Stackify comes in the form of well-moneyed and innovative competitors of all sizes and flavors. Stackify will have to quickly stake out its ground and begin expertly managing its deal funnel and pace of innovation – the core challenges of any startup.

If you’re not a client already, apply for a trial to check it out and put my name in as a reference.

Related, see a slice of the recent survey results on monitor tools from 451’s TheInfoPro – chart above – free on their wonderful chart blog.

Stackify caters to DevOps-oriented teams with ITMaaS monitoring tool (451 Report)