Link: ‘Amazon-proof’ Home Depot builds on its DIY digital foundations

“Versus prior year, our online sales grew 21% in the fourth quarter and 21.5% in fiscal 2017, now representing 6.7% of our total sales. While we are seeing significant growth in our online sales, these online shoppers see the relevance of our stores as approximately 46% of our online U.S. orders are picked up in our stores”
Original source: ‘Amazon-proof’ Home Depot builds on its DIY digital foundations

Link: Is Microsoft Azure really making up ground on AWS?

In terms of raw figures, not growth, Azure is still a way behind. Even a generous assumption of Azure’s share of that US$5.3 billion intelligent cloud revenue figure for the quarter would put it well behind the US$5.1 billion AWS racked in over a similar period. Dave Bartoletti, a principal analyst at Forrester estimates AWS revenue at US$18 billion and Azure, excluding Office 365 and other non-platform revenue, at US$12 billion for the calendar year. “Azure has been growing faster on a smaller base, yes, but in our view, AWS’s growth is still very strong even at their size,” he added. “Azure is giving AWS a run globally, and is close to feature parity on many services. “Azure has also aggressively built out global regions and is on par with AWS for global data centre locations. It’s a healthy and exciting market, and Azure’s doing quite well.”
Original source: Is Microsoft Azure really making up ground on AWS?

Link: Microsoft results show a distributed computing future

“The company reported 98% Azure revenue growth this quarter and commercial cloud revenue growth of 56% year-on-year to $5.3bn. The shift to Office 365 recurring revenue is also beginning to pay off, with the company reporting a 41% increase in Office 365 commercial revenue from installed base growth.”
Original source: Microsoft results show a distributed computing future

​Link: Red Hat on its way to becoming the first billion-dollar-a-quarter open-source company

‘I’ll tell you something that’s not fantasy. In the next few years, Red Hat will become the first billion-dollar-a-quarter open-source company, and that’s real money… Here’s how. First, as Jim Whitehurst, Red Hat CEO, said in the earnings call, “We anticipate exiting the fiscal year with an annualized run-rate of approximately $3 billion for total revenue.”’

Link to original

Atlassian revenue up 47% y/y

The enterprise collaboration software vendor said it earned 12 cents a share, three cents ahead of the consensus estimate. Revenue climbed 41.7% year over year to $193.8 million, also above the $185.8 million analysts had forecasted.

You know what they say: developers don’t pay for anything.

Someone either needs to acquire Atlassian, it has to start acquiring companies, or if the private cloud thing becomes cemented, they need to work with the public cloud three to build out the private cloud toolchain. IBM and CA are the traditional ALM/SDLC acquirers (with occasional raids by the Microsoft barbarians), but that doesn’t seem likely anymore? 

Here, maybe Oracle if they double down on appdev for their new PaaS: retaining their existing Java+Oracle DB empire, feeding it into PaaS? That’s a bit too ornate of a strategy for such as big asset as Atlassian, though.
There’s always PE for big bundling plays, but what would the PE exit strategy be?
Source: At Last! Atlassian Surges on Strong Earnings, Forecast

Oracle’s public cloud momentum

Oracle reports its PaaS and IaaS revenue together, which makes understanding its IaaS growth difficult. FY16 to FY17 revenue increased from $0.9bn to $1.4bn, equivalent to 60% YoY growth. The company claims to have added 14,000 IaaS and PaaS customers to OCI since its inception, almost all of them existing customers of its licensed software. Oracle’s overall revenue in 2016 was $37bn, so IaaS and PaaS still represent a small slice of the pie.

The report has, of course, more detail on the portfolio, e.g.:

A challenge Oracle faced from the beginning was its tardiness to the market. Sure, it could copy and perhaps improve upon existing public cloud offerings, but it would have to do it faster than the rest of the market. AWS, for example, has over 70 services, so there is a lot of ground to cover. Over the past year, Oracle has released 50 services and features – starting from bare-metal compute and storage, the company has added virtual machines, databases, database clustering, load balancers, audit capability, compliance, monitoring, logging, authentication and new images. From a single datacenter in Phoenix, it has expanded to Ashburn, Virginia, and Frankfurt; it is targeting London for early 2018 and APAC further down the line. It has also released and open-sourced a new serverless capability called Fn and a Docker-native platform called Fn Flow for composing serverless applications. The company hopes to distinguish its serverless offering by making it cloud-agnostic, although Java is first among equals in terms of supported languages. Oracle realizes that its capability isn’t as broad as AWS’s, but its rate of development shows it can achieve a lot in a short amount of time.

And:

In 451 Research’s Voice of the Enterprise: Hosting & Cloud Managed Services, Organizational Dynamics 2017 report, 44% of 515 respondents stated that they would pay a premium for an enhanced SLA on performance/uptime; 34% stated that they would pay a premium for enhanced customer support. The median premium for these enhancements was about 20%. Buyers see value in services way beyond just the basics. The challenge for Oracle is convincing customers that it offers the best capability for the best price – there are others in the market with stronger credentials and reputations. stronger credentials and reputations.

Source: Oracle stays the course on IaaS

ScienceLogic momentum

The company targets very large users, with 60% of its customers being MSPs, followed by enterprises at about 30%, and the rest coming from government agencies. It doesn’t report the number of direct customers, but its website boasts 47,000 organizations as users, many of them employing ScienceLogic via service providers. Average annual contract value for direct customers is $125,000.

Source: ScienceLogic targets new use case aimed at frustrated CMDB users