Link: Big three Dutch banks trail rankings, cost and service and issue

While 94% of the 14,000 people in the survey said they used internet banking and 66% used mobile banking apps, ING customers were unhappy about the decision to phase out the use of ‘tan’ codes for approving payments and require mobile approvals instead.

Read more at DutchNews.nl:

Source: Thousands of rejected migrants unable to return to their home countries
Big three Dutch banks trail rankings, cost and service and issue

Link: Police wasted €400,000 on ‘redundant’ emergency app: report

Due to delays and setbacks, the deadline to launch the app in the spring of 2017 was never reached. Construction of the app only started in February 2018. In that period the current Minister of Justice and Security, Ferdinand Grapperhaus, suddenly announced that – contrary to all previous decisions – he is giving priority to the introduction of AML. Making the main function of the 112 app completely obsolete.

Source: Police wasted €400,000 on ‘redundant’ emergency app: report

Link: Ride-hailing app Grab partners Maybank for mobile wallet launch

To be a little Friedman in a taxi here: when I was in Jakarta, you could see the huge banking expansion available in converting much of the country to cashless. All these merchants and buyers (people, if you will) who are purely cash based and don’t have bank accounts. And that’s just one (albeit it, giant) city:

Ooi Huey Tyng, MD, GrabPay Singapore, Malaysia and Philippines, says: “The whole industry needs to come together to make the cashless economy a reality in Malaysia. We are honoured to partner with Maybank which not only shares our vision of a cashless payments future, but also recognises Grab as ideally poised to help make this a reality.

“With GrabPay mobile wallet as the leading payment method on our Grab app, it will build an interconnected ecosystem of our services, thus making Grab an everyday app to complement consumers’ everyday lifestyle.”

Also, I love this “cashless” term. So much better than “mobile payments.”
Original source: Ride-hailing app Grab partners Maybank for mobile wallet launch

Link: Ride-hailing app Grab partners Maybank for mobile wallet launch

To be a little Friedman in a taxi here: when I was in Jakarta, you could see the huge banking expansion available in converting much of the country to cashless. All these merchants and buyers (people, if you will) who are purely cash based and don’t have bank accounts. And that’s just one (albeit it, giant) city:

Ooi Huey Tyng, MD, GrabPay Singapore, Malaysia and Philippines, says: “The whole industry needs to come together to make the cashless economy a reality in Malaysia. We are honoured to partner with Maybank which not only shares our vision of a cashless payments future, but also recognises Grab as ideally poised to help make this a reality.

“With GrabPay mobile wallet as the leading payment method on our Grab app, it will build an interconnected ecosystem of our services, thus making Grab an everyday app to complement consumers’ everyday lifestyle.”

Also, I love this “cashless” term. So much better than “mobile payments.”
Original source: Ride-hailing app Grab partners Maybank for mobile wallet launch

Link: Insurers go all-out on mobile, but what comes next is elusive

“74% of Canadians begin their insurance research journey online, with 25% of those using a smartphone only. Further 61% of this segment will immediately abandon a broker’s website if not considered mobile-friendly, and a full 50% of Canadian consumers believe that if a company does not have a mobile website it does not care about that customer’s business”

Better have a mobile app.
Original source: Insurers go all-out on mobile, but what comes next is elusive

Link: Global race for 5G heats up with latest US Congress bill

“Prices vary widely across the United States but the average cost of installing equipment on a pole is around $2,000 per year. AT&T recently complained that it had received an estimate of $8,000 a year from a city in California. Even in low-cost Georgia, the local government felt it could get away with asking for $6,000 per pole per year…. There are roughly 350,000 base stations in the US and that number would likely have to quadruple (again, these are all rough figures) for 5G. So the annual cost of simply hosting 5G equipment is in the billions of dollars.”
Original source: Global race for 5G heats up with latest US Congress bill

Link: Global race for 5G heats up with latest US Congress bill

“Prices vary widely across the United States but the average cost of installing equipment on a pole is around $2,000 per year. AT&T recently complained that it had received an estimate of $8,000 a year from a city in California. Even in low-cost Georgia, the local government felt it could get away with asking for $6,000 per pole per year…. There are roughly 350,000 base stations in the US and that number would likely have to quadruple (again, these are all rough figures) for 5G. So the annual cost of simply hosting 5G equipment is in the billions of dollars.”
Original source: Global race for 5G heats up with latest US Congress bill

Link: Will 2018 be the year of the neo-luddite?

‘More significantly, the whole of society seems to have woken up to the fact there is a psychological cost to constant checking, swiping and staring. A growing number of my friends now have “no phone” times, don’t instantly sign into the cafe wifi, or have weekends away without their computers. This behaviour is no longer confined to intellectuals and academics, part of some clever critique of modernity. Every single parent I know frets about “screen time”, and most are engaged in a struggle with a toddler over how much iPad is allowed. The alternative is “slow living” or “slow tech”. “Want to become a slow-tech family?” writes Janell Burley Hoffmann, one of its proponents. “Wait! Just wait – in line, at the doctor’s, for the bus, at the school pickup – just sit and wait.” Turning what used to be ordinary behaviour into a “movement” is a very modern way to go about it. But it’s probably necessary.’
Original source: Will 2018 be the year of the neo-luddite?

Link: Google takes $1.1bn chomp out of HTC, smacks lips, burps

Google still looking to crack into hardware. Maybe getting a clutch of regular, steady performers instead of startup rock-stars will help:

‘Google has formally completed its $1.1bn (£780m) takeover of a chunk of HTC, under which some 2,000 staff will transfer to work on the chocolate factory’s Pixel phone.

‘In a blog post, Rick Osterloh, senior hardware veep at the megacorp, said “building hardware is… hard,” adding: “That’s why I’m delighted that we’ve officially closed our deal with HTC.”’
Original source: Google takes $1.1bn chomp out of HTC, smacks lips, burps

Link: Meet Kate Garman, Seattle’s smart cities coordinator, tasked with making the city more efficient

Examples of what a city would do with IoT:

“The private sector has pushed cities in a lot of ways,” she said. “My favorite example is, because Uber and Lyft and other transportation network companies could show you where your ride is on your phone, people started really asking, ‘Well, where’s my snow plow? Where are my services?’ It opened people’s minds to expecting more from the public sector, which is a healthy thing so long as the public sector has enough capacity for it.”
Original source: Meet Kate Garman, Seattle’s smart cities coordinator, tasked with making the city more efficient

Link: Meet Kate Garman, Seattle’s smart cities coordinator, tasked with making the city more efficient

Examples of what a city would do with IoT:

“The private sector has pushed cities in a lot of ways,” she said. “My favorite example is, because Uber and Lyft and other transportation network companies could show you where your ride is on your phone, people started really asking, ‘Well, where’s my snow plow? Where are my services?’ It opened people’s minds to expecting more from the public sector, which is a healthy thing so long as the public sector has enough capacity for it.”
Original source: Meet Kate Garman, Seattle’s smart cities coordinator, tasked with making the city more efficient

Link: Tolerating distraction

“The modern anxiety about distraction betrays a good deal about us. Insofar as we associate attention with power and control, it reflects our fears of losing both in an increasingly unpredictable cultural and natural climate. We also find ourselves living in an economy where we pay for cultural goods with our attention, so it makes sense that we worry about running out of a precious currency.”
Original source: Tolerating distraction

~9m/yr. VR unit shipments in context


Simon Sharwood pulls together some shipment numbers to put VR headset shipments in context.

The tl;dr on annual shipments: 9.2m VR headsets, vs. 135.6m wearbles, vs. ~1.5bn smartphones.

Details

VR headsets have a runrate of, like, 9.2m units:

Virtual reality headsets are moving at a rate of 2.3 million a quarter

But, fast growing:

IDC says shipments are up 77.4 per cent year over year.

Meanwhile, wearables are at something like “33.9 million shipments a month,” like a runrate of 135.6m units.

Meanwhile, taking from this year’s Internet Trends report (sourced from Morgan Stanley), smart phone shipments are under 1.5bn, though slowing in growth:


And then smartphone shipments from IDC (probably where Morgan got those numbers):

For the full year [of 2016], the worldwide smartphone market saw a total of 1.47 billion units shipped, marking the highest year of shipments on record, yet up only 2.3% from the 1.44 billion units shipped in 2015.

Source: Virtual reality headsets even less popular than wearable devices

Can’t get enough of that computer in your pocket

Nomophobia (/’noʊ-moʊ-‘foʊ-biː-ə/; noh-moh-pho-bee-ah): Fear of being without one’s mobile phone.

No-mobile-phobia, or nomophobia, is probably one of the great universals of the day. This newly minted word describes a real problem internationally, as we all grow ever more attached to the tiny devices that dominate our lives. The word appeared on both British and American captioning professionals’ lists.

Link

Amazon grocery store has no cash registers, uses phone

Customers scan the Amazon Go app on their smartphone as they enter the store. The company spent four years developing “just walk out” technology, which detects when items are picked up or returned to shelves and “keeps track of them in a virtual cart,” Amazon said. There’s no checkout line — just leave the store with your groceries, and Amazon will charge your account.

Link

T-Mobile shifting entirely to unlimited data in new bid to shake up industry

Under the new plan, the Bellevue, Wash.-based wireless company will charge $70/month for the first line, $50/month for the second, and $20/month for additional lines up to eight, if the customer has auto-pay enabled. That averages to $40/month for a family of four, the company notes.

I’ll gave to check into that/

Source: T-Mobile shifting entirely to unlimited data in new bid to shake up industry

ARM deal analysis from RedMonk Rachel & 451

There’s some proper, and surprisingly concise deal analysis over there:

While growth has come from the IoT, ARM’s resurgence in recent years – and Intel’s opposite trajectory – have been the result of the London company’s dominance in mobile devices. (In 2015, “45% of the ARM-based chips went into mobile devices.”) The so-called Wintel monopoly carried both of those parties to valuations that ARM never approached, but as mobile steadily eroded PC spend ARM’s low power designs found success on both of the most successful mobile platforms. Both Apple’s iOS devices and Android’s array of hardware are either exclusively or nearly so ARM-based.

Check out the rest!

Meanwhile, from John Abbott at 451 Research:

  • ARM “generated less than $1.5bn in revenue last year and has only 3,300 employee”
  • “SoftBank will pay 20.9x trailing revenue for ARM. That’s the first time any company has cracked the 20x mark in a $1bn-plus chip acquisition.”
  • ARM “holds a 40% share in consumer goods, 30% in embedded intelligence, 15% in network infrastructure and 10% in automotive.”
  • “Revenue reached $1.49bn in 2015, up 15% from the previous year, with a net profit of $360.7m.”
  • Read more for his overall sentiment, which is basically: SoftBanks’ money and reach can fuel faster marketshare growth in these convert all the toasters to IoT grills times. checks out.

Dealing with “disposable software” for enterprises

With consumer SaaSes and mobile apps coming and going, I’ve been thinking of the idea of “disposable software”: apps that last a year or so, but aren’t guaranteed to last longer. In the consumer space, there’s rarely been a guarantee that free software will last – that’s part of the “price” you pay for free.

This mentality is getting into business software more and more, however, and I don’t think “enterprises” are prepared for it. Part of the premium you pay for enterprise software should include the guarantee that it will have a longer life-cycle, but it’s worth asking if it does.

Also, it’s good for enterprises to be aware of vendors, particularly open source driven ones, are putting out code that might be “disposable.” The prevailing product management think nowadays encourages experimenting and trying things out: abandoning “failed” experiments and continuing successful ones. Clearly, if you’re a “normal” enterprise, you want to avoid those failed experiments and, at best, properly control and govern your use of them.

Of course, there are trade-offs:

  • With consumer, experiment-driven software, you’re always getting the newest thinking, which might turn out to be a good idea and provide your business with differentiating, “secret sauce”; or it might be a failed experiment that gets canceled
  • With “enterprise,” stable software you can generally count on it existing and being supported next year; but you’ll often be behind the curve on innovation, meaning you’ll have to layer on the “secret sauce” on your own.

It’s good to engage with both types of strategies, you just have manage the approach to hedge the risks of each.

Business people need to understand how software development works

This led middle managers to over promise and under deliver. One middle manager told us that “you can get resources by promising something earlier, or promising a lot. It’s sales work.” This was made worse by the lack of technical competence among top managers, which influenced how they could assess technological limitations during goal setting.

As one middle manager pointed out to us, at Apple the top managers are engineers. “We make everything into a business case and use figures to prove what’s good, whereas Apple is engineer-driven.” Top managers acknowledged to us that “there was no real software competence in the top management team”.

Who knows if that notion about Apple is true or if it causes their success. The broader point of needing to understand the unpredictable nature of software is still important. As more organizations start using and making custom written software (if only to make mobile “store fronts” to their business), knowledge of the chaotic nature of software development needs to spread more beyond IT. Even IT people get it dreadfully wrong often.

So far the best tactic we have is to redefine what “success is”: it’s not delivering everything you promised on time, but being predictable about delivering something on regular intervals. That’s a vague way of saying delivering smaller batches of code into production more often. We sort of predict/hope that this results in more useful, better software overall. We’ll see.

Now, of course, part of this process is being honest about reality. The analysis of Nokia’s failures because “management” would not accept “real talk” from their employees will kill any innovation-driven business. As the company (and RIM and countless others) shows: tech companies are never so secure that they can afford to be confident in their market position.

Digital transformation progress report – Home Depot builds a digital future

“Last year [2014], about 40% of all the orders generated on homedepot.com actually finished in one of our orange box stores. Customers find it incredibly convenient to be able to pick up a product when they wanted to. They didn’t have to worry about whether or not it was on their doorstep. And so that is a great opportunity not only to sell more product, but to drive traffic to our stores, sell them additional product when they come in and pick that product up.”

Digital transformation progress report – Home Depot builds a digital future

A simple case of going digital

Innovation in the container industry, the old school containers:

Our legacy way of doing business would be to send officers out to containers, container ships and they would go along with printed sheets and check lists, and they would look at manifests and they’d write the numbers down and count what’s in the actual containers themselves, and they’d make all their notes and they would do that all day long. Then they would go into the office at the end of the day and log in to an application and start entering all that data. When all of that was done, they’d click a release button to release a container and then move onto the next container. When you deal in a world of just-in-time delivery, that can be really problematic to our partners, because Dell is looking for those parts that just came in on that container ship from Europe; they can’t wait for us to clear it two or three days later.

So what we did is, our targeting analytical systems program office worked with our cargo program office to create a mobile app that would actually allow an officer to go out and data-enter that stuff in the field on the mobile device and then click the release button while still on the ship. So, a couple of things: They can use barcode scanners to get a lot of that information so it reduces the data entry, increasing the officers’ efficiency while also increasing their ability to live release cargo containers as they walk down from container to container on the ship. So that is transformative. Just a completely different way of doing business — far more accurate, far more efficient for the officers and a far better use of their time than having them sit at a terminal typing all that data in when they are tired at end of their shift.

From “CBP’s Wolf Tombe: Mobile, wearable technologies will advance mission”

Gartner Says Demand for Enterprise Mobile Apps Will Outstrip Available Development Capacity Five to One

“Organizations increasingly find it difficult to be proactive against competitive pressures, which is resulting in their mobile apps becoming tactical, rather than strategic,” said Mr. Leow. “We’re seeing demand for mobile apps outstrip available development capacity, making quick creation of apps even more challenging. Mobile strategists must use tools and techniques that match the increase in mobile app needs within their organizations.” And: “Gartner believes organizations will improve their in-house mobile development skills over time, but currently only 26 percent of organizations are adopting an in-house-only development approach, while 55 percent are successfully delivering apps using mixed sourcing.”

Gartner Says Demand for Enterprise Mobile Apps Will Outstrip Available Development Capacity Five to One