Link: Google takes $1.1bn chomp out of HTC, smacks lips, burps

Google still looking to crack into hardware. Maybe getting a clutch of regular, steady performers instead of startup rock-stars will help:

‘Google has formally completed its $1.1bn (£780m) takeover of a chunk of HTC, under which some 2,000 staff will transfer to work on the chocolate factory’s Pixel phone.

‘In a blog post, Rick Osterloh, senior hardware veep at the megacorp, said “building hardware is… hard,” adding: “That’s why I’m delighted that we’ve officially closed our deal with HTC.”’
Original source: Google takes $1.1bn chomp out of HTC, smacks lips, burps

Link: Meet Kate Garman, Seattle’s smart cities coordinator, tasked with making the city more efficient

Examples of what a city would do with IoT:

“The private sector has pushed cities in a lot of ways,” she said. “My favorite example is, because Uber and Lyft and other transportation network companies could show you where your ride is on your phone, people started really asking, ‘Well, where’s my snow plow? Where are my services?’ It opened people’s minds to expecting more from the public sector, which is a healthy thing so long as the public sector has enough capacity for it.”
Original source: Meet Kate Garman, Seattle’s smart cities coordinator, tasked with making the city more efficient

Link: Meet Kate Garman, Seattle’s smart cities coordinator, tasked with making the city more efficient

Examples of what a city would do with IoT:

“The private sector has pushed cities in a lot of ways,” she said. “My favorite example is, because Uber and Lyft and other transportation network companies could show you where your ride is on your phone, people started really asking, ‘Well, where’s my snow plow? Where are my services?’ It opened people’s minds to expecting more from the public sector, which is a healthy thing so long as the public sector has enough capacity for it.”
Original source: Meet Kate Garman, Seattle’s smart cities coordinator, tasked with making the city more efficient

Link: Tolerating distraction

“The modern anxiety about distraction betrays a good deal about us. Insofar as we associate attention with power and control, it reflects our fears of losing both in an increasingly unpredictable cultural and natural climate. We also find ourselves living in an economy where we pay for cultural goods with our attention, so it makes sense that we worry about running out of a precious currency.”
Original source: Tolerating distraction

~9m/yr. VR unit shipments in context


Simon Sharwood pulls together some shipment numbers to put VR headset shipments in context.

The tl;dr on annual shipments: 9.2m VR headsets, vs. 135.6m wearbles, vs. ~1.5bn smartphones.

Details

VR headsets have a runrate of, like, 9.2m units:

Virtual reality headsets are moving at a rate of 2.3 million a quarter

But, fast growing:

IDC says shipments are up 77.4 per cent year over year.

Meanwhile, wearables are at something like “33.9 million shipments a month,” like a runrate of 135.6m units.

Meanwhile, taking from this year’s Internet Trends report (sourced from Morgan Stanley), smart phone shipments are under 1.5bn, though slowing in growth:


And then smartphone shipments from IDC (probably where Morgan got those numbers):

For the full year [of 2016], the worldwide smartphone market saw a total of 1.47 billion units shipped, marking the highest year of shipments on record, yet up only 2.3% from the 1.44 billion units shipped in 2015.

Source: Virtual reality headsets even less popular than wearable devices