Link: Big three Dutch banks trail rankings, cost and service and issue

While 94% of the 14,000 people in the survey said they used internet banking and 66% used mobile banking apps, ING customers were unhappy about the decision to phase out the use of ‘tan’ codes for approving payments and require mobile approvals instead.

Read more at DutchNews.nl:

Source: Thousands of rejected migrants unable to return to their home countries
Big three Dutch banks trail rankings, cost and service and issue

Link: Police wasted €400,000 on ‘redundant’ emergency app: report

Due to delays and setbacks, the deadline to launch the app in the spring of 2017 was never reached. Construction of the app only started in February 2018. In that period the current Minister of Justice and Security, Ferdinand Grapperhaus, suddenly announced that – contrary to all previous decisions – he is giving priority to the introduction of AML. Making the main function of the 112 app completely obsolete.

Source: Police wasted €400,000 on ‘redundant’ emergency app: report

Link: Exclusive poll: America sours on social media giants

About 40% of Americans still feel that social media is a net positive for society. Overall, 65% of people say smartphones have made their quality of life better.

And people are concerned about misinformation in THE SOCIAL.
Original source: Exclusive poll: America sours on social media giants

Link: Ride-hailing app Grab partners Maybank for mobile wallet launch

To be a little Friedman in a taxi here: when I was in Jakarta, you could see the huge banking expansion available in converting much of the country to cashless. All these merchants and buyers (people, if you will) who are purely cash based and don’t have bank accounts. And that’s just one (albeit it, giant) city:

Ooi Huey Tyng, MD, GrabPay Singapore, Malaysia and Philippines, says: “The whole industry needs to come together to make the cashless economy a reality in Malaysia. We are honoured to partner with Maybank which not only shares our vision of a cashless payments future, but also recognises Grab as ideally poised to help make this a reality.

“With GrabPay mobile wallet as the leading payment method on our Grab app, it will build an interconnected ecosystem of our services, thus making Grab an everyday app to complement consumers’ everyday lifestyle.”

Also, I love this “cashless” term. So much better than “mobile payments.”
Original source: Ride-hailing app Grab partners Maybank for mobile wallet launch

Link: Ride-hailing app Grab partners Maybank for mobile wallet launch

To be a little Friedman in a taxi here: when I was in Jakarta, you could see the huge banking expansion available in converting much of the country to cashless. All these merchants and buyers (people, if you will) who are purely cash based and don’t have bank accounts. And that’s just one (albeit it, giant) city:

Ooi Huey Tyng, MD, GrabPay Singapore, Malaysia and Philippines, says: “The whole industry needs to come together to make the cashless economy a reality in Malaysia. We are honoured to partner with Maybank which not only shares our vision of a cashless payments future, but also recognises Grab as ideally poised to help make this a reality.

“With GrabPay mobile wallet as the leading payment method on our Grab app, it will build an interconnected ecosystem of our services, thus making Grab an everyday app to complement consumers’ everyday lifestyle.”

Also, I love this “cashless” term. So much better than “mobile payments.”
Original source: Ride-hailing app Grab partners Maybank for mobile wallet launch

Link: Insurers go all-out on mobile, but what comes next is elusive

“74% of Canadians begin their insurance research journey online, with 25% of those using a smartphone only. Further 61% of this segment will immediately abandon a broker’s website if not considered mobile-friendly, and a full 50% of Canadian consumers believe that if a company does not have a mobile website it does not care about that customer’s business”

Better have a mobile app.
Original source: Insurers go all-out on mobile, but what comes next is elusive

Link: Global race for 5G heats up with latest US Congress bill

“Prices vary widely across the United States but the average cost of installing equipment on a pole is around $2,000 per year. AT&T recently complained that it had received an estimate of $8,000 a year from a city in California. Even in low-cost Georgia, the local government felt it could get away with asking for $6,000 per pole per year…. There are roughly 350,000 base stations in the US and that number would likely have to quadruple (again, these are all rough figures) for 5G. So the annual cost of simply hosting 5G equipment is in the billions of dollars.”
Original source: Global race for 5G heats up with latest US Congress bill

Link: Global race for 5G heats up with latest US Congress bill

“Prices vary widely across the United States but the average cost of installing equipment on a pole is around $2,000 per year. AT&T recently complained that it had received an estimate of $8,000 a year from a city in California. Even in low-cost Georgia, the local government felt it could get away with asking for $6,000 per pole per year…. There are roughly 350,000 base stations in the US and that number would likely have to quadruple (again, these are all rough figures) for 5G. So the annual cost of simply hosting 5G equipment is in the billions of dollars.”
Original source: Global race for 5G heats up with latest US Congress bill

Link: Will 2018 be the year of the neo-luddite?

‘More significantly, the whole of society seems to have woken up to the fact there is a psychological cost to constant checking, swiping and staring. A growing number of my friends now have “no phone” times, don’t instantly sign into the cafe wifi, or have weekends away without their computers. This behaviour is no longer confined to intellectuals and academics, part of some clever critique of modernity. Every single parent I know frets about “screen time”, and most are engaged in a struggle with a toddler over how much iPad is allowed. The alternative is “slow living” or “slow tech”. “Want to become a slow-tech family?” writes Janell Burley Hoffmann, one of its proponents. “Wait! Just wait – in line, at the doctor’s, for the bus, at the school pickup – just sit and wait.” Turning what used to be ordinary behaviour into a “movement” is a very modern way to go about it. But it’s probably necessary.’
Original source: Will 2018 be the year of the neo-luddite?

Link: Apple Pay accepted at 1 out of 2 U.S. stores, says Apple VP Jennifer Bailey

“Apple Pay availability was limited to about 3 percent of stores in the U.S. when it launched in 2014, but is now accepted in 50 percent of stores.”
Original source: Apple Pay accepted at 1 out of 2 U.S. stores, says Apple VP Jennifer Bailey

Link: Google takes $1.1bn chomp out of HTC, smacks lips, burps

Google still looking to crack into hardware. Maybe getting a clutch of regular, steady performers instead of startup rock-stars will help:

‘Google has formally completed its $1.1bn (£780m) takeover of a chunk of HTC, under which some 2,000 staff will transfer to work on the chocolate factory’s Pixel phone.

‘In a blog post, Rick Osterloh, senior hardware veep at the megacorp, said “building hardware is… hard,” adding: “That’s why I’m delighted that we’ve officially closed our deal with HTC.”’
Original source: Google takes $1.1bn chomp out of HTC, smacks lips, burps

Link: Meet Kate Garman, Seattle’s smart cities coordinator, tasked with making the city more efficient

Examples of what a city would do with IoT:

“The private sector has pushed cities in a lot of ways,” she said. “My favorite example is, because Uber and Lyft and other transportation network companies could show you where your ride is on your phone, people started really asking, ‘Well, where’s my snow plow? Where are my services?’ It opened people’s minds to expecting more from the public sector, which is a healthy thing so long as the public sector has enough capacity for it.”
Original source: Meet Kate Garman, Seattle’s smart cities coordinator, tasked with making the city more efficient

Link: Meet Kate Garman, Seattle’s smart cities coordinator, tasked with making the city more efficient

Examples of what a city would do with IoT:

“The private sector has pushed cities in a lot of ways,” she said. “My favorite example is, because Uber and Lyft and other transportation network companies could show you where your ride is on your phone, people started really asking, ‘Well, where’s my snow plow? Where are my services?’ It opened people’s minds to expecting more from the public sector, which is a healthy thing so long as the public sector has enough capacity for it.”
Original source: Meet Kate Garman, Seattle’s smart cities coordinator, tasked with making the city more efficient

Link: Tolerating distraction

“The modern anxiety about distraction betrays a good deal about us. Insofar as we associate attention with power and control, it reflects our fears of losing both in an increasingly unpredictable cultural and natural climate. We also find ourselves living in an economy where we pay for cultural goods with our attention, so it makes sense that we worry about running out of a precious currency.”
Original source: Tolerating distraction

Link: Kroger is taking a direct shot at Amazon and Walmart and making checkout lanes obsolete – Business Insider

“In 2018, [Kroger] is rolling out a new service to 400 stores that will enable shoppers to scan and pay for their items without checkout lanes, registers, or cashiers.”
Link to original

~9m/yr. VR unit shipments in context


Simon Sharwood pulls together some shipment numbers to put VR headset shipments in context.

The tl;dr on annual shipments: 9.2m VR headsets, vs. 135.6m wearbles, vs. ~1.5bn smartphones.

Details

VR headsets have a runrate of, like, 9.2m units:

Virtual reality headsets are moving at a rate of 2.3 million a quarter

But, fast growing:

IDC says shipments are up 77.4 per cent year over year.

Meanwhile, wearables are at something like “33.9 million shipments a month,” like a runrate of 135.6m units.

Meanwhile, taking from this year’s Internet Trends report (sourced from Morgan Stanley), smart phone shipments are under 1.5bn, though slowing in growth:


And then smartphone shipments from IDC (probably where Morgan got those numbers):

For the full year [of 2016], the worldwide smartphone market saw a total of 1.47 billion units shipped, marking the highest year of shipments on record, yet up only 2.3% from the 1.44 billion units shipped in 2015.

Source: Virtual reality headsets even less popular than wearable devices

Can’t get enough of that computer in your pocket

Nomophobia (/’noʊ-moʊ-‘foʊ-biː-ə/; noh-moh-pho-bee-ah): Fear of being without one’s mobile phone.

No-mobile-phobia, or nomophobia, is probably one of the great universals of the day. This newly minted word describes a real problem internationally, as we all grow ever more attached to the tiny devices that dominate our lives. The word appeared on both British and American captioning professionals’ lists.

Link